Author Topic: Engine Making Skills Gap  (Read 2216 times)

Offline Vixen

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Engine Making Skills Gap
« on: April 05, 2017, 08:13:23 PM »
Now that the thread about general learning 'skills gap' has been closed, at long last. How about one on our own engine making skill short falls?

We have all been there and done it, even made a photo record.

Who is brave enough to post their Engine Making Skills Gap?

This was my first attempt to turn a muzzle brake for a 1/6 scale panzer tank. Longitudinal (X axis) feed way too high resulting in a high velocity low flying object exiting the chuck past my left ear.






My second attempt was a bit better


Now it's your turn to own up

Mike


It is the journey that matters, not the destination

Offline Jo

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Re: Engine Making Skills Gap
« Reply #1 on: April 05, 2017, 08:22:59 PM »
I always try to post what I am doing warts and all  :embarassed: in real time, in the knowledge that JB will quickly be along to point out any short falls in my techniques and to explain how he would have done it, so no one else tries to do it in the cack handed way I did  ::)

After all some people never do a piece wrong  :lolb:

Jo

Usus est optimum magister

Offline crueby

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Re: Engine Making Skills Gap
« Reply #2 on: April 05, 2017, 08:27:47 PM »
Makes sense it went flying so fast, it WAS for a tank gun...   :Lol:

I had one come loose from the drill press vise and fly by me like that, hit the back wall 25 feet away pretty hard. No pics on it, though the stunned expression on my face must have been good! 

One time was setting up a winged tenon cutter in the router, when the router was in its table mount, with the cutter facing up. Was getting ready to cut a groove in the edge of a board for a sailboat. I must not have had the collet tightened right, or maybe the bit was too shallow in the collet, since I reached under the table to turn on the router, and as it spun up the cutter (1/4" thick wing cutter about 2" diameter) wobbled a little, bent its shank, the cutter edge bent over and caught the table, launched the whole cutter up into my chest, right off the breastbone in the center. Fortunately it was not going too fast at that point so it just left a bruise and did not go through the skin. The shank was bent about 30 degrees over.

Those were my two closest calls (and THAT, boys and girls, is why you wear protective gear around power tools!).

Next!

Offline mklotz

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Re: Engine Making Skills Gap
« Reply #3 on: April 05, 2017, 08:39:59 PM »

One time was setting up a winged tenon cutter in the router, when the router was in its table mount, with the cutter facing up. Was getting ready to cut a groove in the edge of a board for a sailboat. I must not have had the collet tightened right, or maybe the bit was too shallow in the collet, since I reached under the table to turn on the router, and as it spun up the cutter (1/4" thick wing cutter about 2" diameter) wobbled a little, bent its shank, the cutter edge bent over and caught the table, launched the whole cutter up into my chest, right off the breastbone in the center. Fortunately it was not going too fast at that point so it just left a bruise and did not go through the skin. The shank was bent about 30 degrees over.

Those were my two closest calls (and THAT, boys and girls, is why you wear protective gear around power tools!).


Safety glasses yes, but I seldom wear my breast-plate anymore.  It makes me look so Carthaginian.

I've seen guys using a draw-knife on a shaving horse wearing a flat wood chest plate suspended by a neck band.  Some gorgets, especially those worn by the Nazi military police, might work nicely.
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Online Admiral_dk

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Re: Engine Making Skills Gap
« Reply #4 on: April 05, 2017, 08:46:45 PM »
I don't remember taking any photos of thing going wrong that I have in my possession .... (though with my memory it doesn't say much).

But I will admit that I've been saved more time than I can count over the years from the fact that I'm using glasses (near sighted) and this isn't something I can rely on in the future as I'm old enough now that certain things are much easier to see without the glasses  :censored:

Offline crueby

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Re: Engine Making Skills Gap
« Reply #5 on: April 05, 2017, 08:56:46 PM »

One time was setting up a winged tenon cutter in the router, when the router was in its table mount, with the cutter facing up. Was getting ready to cut a groove in the edge of a board for a sailboat. I must not have had the collet tightened right, or maybe the bit was too shallow in the collet, since I reached under the table to turn on the router, and as it spun up the cutter (1/4" thick wing cutter about 2" diameter) wobbled a little, bent its shank, the cutter edge bent over and caught the table, launched the whole cutter up into my chest, right off the breastbone in the center. Fortunately it was not going too fast at that point so it just left a bruise and did not go through the skin. The shank was bent about 30 degrees over.

Those were my two closest calls (and THAT, boys and girls, is why you wear protective gear around power tools!).


Safety glasses yes, but I seldom wear my breast-plate anymore.  It makes me look so Carthaginian.

I've seen guys using a draw-knife on a shaving horse wearing a flat wood chest plate suspended by a neck band.  Some gorgets, especially those worn by the Nazi military police, might work nicely.
Never seen the chest protectors with a draw knife before, since the motion you use it with (elbows in, pulling back) tends to stop the blade short of your chest. Though maybe theirs had shorter handles than mine do.

We need a picture of you in full armor! Got the helmet with the crest out the top?

Online Bluechip

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Re: Engine Making Skills Gap
« Reply #6 on: April 05, 2017, 09:13:51 PM »
Maybe this is more like it ... Good enough for Henry VIII ...  :ThumbsUp:

Dave

Been to Leeds several times. Some really impressive metalwork, engraving & etching I think. Repousse ????

https://collections.royalarmouries.org/#/objects

« Last Edit: April 05, 2017, 09:20:41 PM by Bluechip »

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Engine Making Skills Gap
« Reply #7 on: April 06, 2017, 12:08:26 AM »
Here's mine. Or rather one of many many many...

This may have been my first project on the mill I'd just gotten.
It was a triangle with two holes.
Yes, the triangle was spaced above the table. No...it didn't matter.



That was years ago. And a few days ago FB (which likes to post pictures from one's past) posted this one just to remind me.  :-[
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline 90LX_Notch

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Re: Engine Making Skills Gap
« Reply #8 on: April 06, 2017, 01:37:35 AM »
Edge finders can cause damage.  This was on the mixer body for the "Tiny" i.c.  I was picking up the small shoulder and when the edge finder jumped, it walked over the part. 

The good news is that the edge finder is fine.

-Bob
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Offline 10KPete

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Re: Engine Making Skills Gap
« Reply #9 on: April 06, 2017, 01:42:51 AM »
Lesson learned there: Never try to use the very end of the edge finder.... always the center!   :old:

Don't ask me how I learned that!  :slap:

Pete @ which end of the boo-boo list do I start at?

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SB 10K lathe, Benchmaster mill. And stuff.

Offline Jo

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Re: Engine Making Skills Gap
« Reply #10 on: April 06, 2017, 07:16:25 AM »
Wobblers do similar  :facepalm2:

When it knocks off centre it jumps up and sometime there is just enough space for it to jam itself over the work causing a gouge in the piece, especially gunmetal  :(

Jo
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Offline Jasonb

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Re: Engine Making Skills Gap
« Reply #11 on: April 06, 2017, 07:41:06 AM »
Or just use an electronic edge finder they don't go anywhere when contact is made :)

Parts can always be saved or remade making sure that the second time around you have more material in the chuck when parting them off ;)