Author Topic: AOG's version of Elmer's number 32 The tall vertical open column engine.  (Read 504 times)

Online AOG

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With the Popular complete I think it's time for a new engine. More specifically it's time for one of Elmer's engines. I wanted to do something a bit more complicated so I decided to make Elmer's number 32, the "tall vertical open column engine"



Let's get started with the base. The holes for the cylinder and columns were drilled.



Then the cylinder mounting holes were tapped.



With the base done it was time to make the table. I laid it out and drilled the mounting holes. Next I chain drilled the areas to be cut out.



The chain drilled areas were cut out and cleaned up by filing.



With the table done I needed something to hold it up. I cut four bars of hex stock to length and then drilled and tapped the bottom end.



The top end was turned down and threaded 10-24.



Then it was over to the mill where where the holes for the arms were drilled and tapped.



I'll end this with the first family shot



Till next time

Tony


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Online Mike Bondarczuk

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Hi Tony,

Following along to see where this road ends and hope to learn from you.

Mike

Online b.lindsey

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Wonderful...a new Tony build  :) and another great start on this one. You are keeping your shop busy Tony and turning out some fine work too!! Will be following along on this one too  :popcorn:

Bill

Offline Flyboy Jim

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Good start Tony. I'll be following along.  :popcorn:

Jim
Sherline 4400 Lathe
Sherline 5400 Mill

Online AOG

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Thanks everyone. It was a productive weekend but as we say in aviation "the jobs not done until it's documented". First up was the bearing blocks. The blocks were squared up and cut to size. Next the mounting holes were drilled.



Then the blankets were superglued together and the holes for the bearings were drilled and reamed.



Then I used the Arnoldb method of rounding the ends. A drill bit shank was pushed through the blanks. Next a series of tiny step cuts were taken to set the general shape of the curve.



Then the part was cleaned up on the belt sander until the curves were smoothed out. Then I turned a set of bronze bearings to be a slip fit in the hole. Eventually I will put them in with Locktite. That way they won't distort from being pressed in.



Next up is the crankshaft. I started by turning the boss and the outer diameter. Then I drilled the center hole.



Then the part was moved to the mill while still on the parent stock. The crank hole was drilled and tapped and the crank web were cut.



Then the crank was parted off from the parent stock. Next I cut the shaft and turned it down to fit the crank.



The shaft was pressed into the crank and then the crank was trued up in the lathe.



Next up were the parallel motion arms. Two blanks were squared up and cut to size. Then the end holes were drilled.



The forks were then milled out.



The sides were milled down to dimension.



Then I soldered the pins into the fork. I deviated from Elmer's construction method by soldering in a single pin. Here they are right out of the pickle.



Then the center was cut out and cleaned up with some hand filling. Next the ends were rounded over and set of rods were threaded at both ends.



I started to put everything together for a family shot when I realized that I had forgotten to tap the holes in the bearing blocks. With that taken care of here is the family shot.



Work is a little crazy this week so it might be a while before I can post the next update.

Thanks for looking

Tony


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Online b.lindsey

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That was a productive weekend Tony. You are moving right along !!

Bill

Offline Flyboy Jim

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You're moving right along, Tony. Looks like an interesting build. How are the plans to work with?

Jim
Sherline 4400 Lathe
Sherline 5400 Mill

Online AOG

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Jim, it's an Elmer's build albeit a more advanced one. At this point they are pretty much a known quantity to me. The only thing that's new for me is the cylinder process. There is some silver soldering required but nothing that looks to tricky. After the P&W you should be able to pull this off easily on your Sherlines.

Tony

Offline zeeprogrammer

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That was quick.

I enjoy seeing Elmer engine builds.  :ThumbsUp:
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you', whistles, and certain dinner bells.
"Found a peanut."
To work. To work. Zee-The Thread Trasher.

Online AOG

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It's time for an update. Not a lot accomplished last week. I spent the whole week working on the cylinder and it kicked my tailpipe. I started by squaring up the blank. Then I drilled the exhaust port.



Then the port side was milled out.



Next I drilled the mounting holes for the valve chest.



I went to go tap the holes and I realized that I had misread the chart and drilled the holes clearance size. So it was back to the mil where I drilled out the holes, plugged them and redrilled and tapped them. Then the part was taken to the lathe. Where one end was turned round.



Then the cylinder was bored and reamed.



I went to lap the cylinder when I screwed up the adjustment of the lap at it seized in the bore. I had to drill it out and reream and lap the cylinder. The part was flipped in the chuck and the other end turned round.



Then it was over to the mill where I drilled and tapped the ends.



Next I milled the port slots into each end of the cylinder.



Now for the part I was dreading, the angled cuts to the port faces.



......and I botched one. I ended up cutting into the exhaust passage on one side. I ended up plugging the exhaust hole and re drilling the passage and the ports. Next I cut the cylinder flats down.



.....and I botched that task as well. While cutting one side, I didn't tighten the vise enough. The part moved and I dug into one of the rounded ends and exposed one of the mounting holes. After a long break and some thinking I think I found a way to save the part. The functional parts of the cylinder are still good the issues are cosmetic. Alternate plan c is to not round over the rest of the cylinder but to lag it with some mahogany strips instead. I'll do that part when I do the fettling and finishing. Here's the final part.



Till next time

Tony


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Offline Flyboy Jim

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That's a bummer you had issues Tony.  :wallbang: There's definitely days like that. However alternate plan "C" sounds good.

Jim
Sherline 4400 Lathe
Sherline 5400 Mill