Author Topic: Zee's Shop Beginnings  (Read 73248 times)

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Zee's Shop Beginnings
« Reply #60 on: January 31, 2017, 12:28:38 AM »
Marv, what is a pot chuck? I haven't heard that term before.

Hee hee hee. Does anyone else know what's coming?

It turned out tonight was Chicken Kiev with cous-cous and roasted brocolli.
Oh right. Wrong forum. Sorry.

P.S. I don't know a pot chuck either.

P.P.S. Nice try Jim.  ;D
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Offline Tin Falcon

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Re: Zee's Shop Beginnings
« Reply #61 on: January 31, 2017, 12:40:25 AM »
Quote
I know............I know!! It's Pot Roast made with Chuck Roast!  :LickLips: Did I get it right!   :naughty:
Yes and NO . if you google pot chuck it directs you to pot chuck roast very tasty but no good for holding parts in the lathe. the below photo is what marv is referring to a handy tool to have


these are similar to step chucks  a well used pot chuck can be turned into a step chuck . A new one can be used that way as well but nice to be able to use for small diameters as well.   These are designed to machine to size more or less expendable tooling.
« Last Edit: January 31, 2017, 12:46:11 AM by Tin Falcon »

Online crueby

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Re: Zee's Shop Beginnings
« Reply #62 on: January 31, 2017, 12:42:49 AM »
Thanks Tin! I have seen those, just not by that name.



At least I didn't ask about a Henway.

Offline Tin Falcon

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Re: Zee's Shop Beginnings
« Reply #63 on: January 31, 2017, 12:46:47 AM »
4- 5 pounds LOL
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Offline gerritv

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Re: Zee's Shop Beginnings
« Reply #64 on: January 31, 2017, 01:09:54 AM »
As tasty as potchuck sounds, we are actually talking about this: http://modelenginenews.org/techniques/potc.html

Gerrit

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Offline Jo

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Re: Zee's Shop Beginnings
« Reply #65 on: January 31, 2017, 07:17:55 AM »
Yes those are pot chucks. Both Don and I made them a little deeper when we made out Universal Pillar Tools ball handles. Those looked like little top hats with one wide slot to take the handle while the balls were held in the cup and two fractional slots to give a little more flexibility.

With very thin bits I normally use a superglue chuck  :D Of course I normally use 5Cs which are very good at holding short flanges ( e.g. <1mm) so I don't need thin piece chucks once they have a machined piece to hold on ;)

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Offline mklotz

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Re: Zee's Shop Beginnings
« Reply #66 on: January 31, 2017, 03:03:51 PM »
Marv, what is a pot chuck? I haven't heard that term before.

It was a 60's thing.  You had to be there to dig it. :-)

OK, seriously, the pictures Tin showed describe one form of it.  His version can be grasped in any chuck, including a collet chuck.  The reason I mentioned it in connection with a collet chuck is that the type I have has a 5C collet body rather than the cylindrical gripping extension.

To use them, you insert the stabilizing pin in the center so the jaws don't collapse when you pull the collet in, then machine a shallow depression of the diameter of the part into the face.  Remove the pin and loosen the collet.  It will expand enough to allow insertion of the part in the depression.  Reinstall the collet and, when tightened, the part will be held firmly and concentrically.

Obviously, pot chucks are a consumable item.  You can only cut so many depressions before the working volume is gone.  As a hobbyist though, you'll find that you use them so infrequently that they last a long time.

Cheapskates like me make their own along the lines of Tin's images.  I use a hose clamp around the circumference of the clamping volume to close the sectors down on the part.

For one-offs a superglue chuck or a watchmaker style pitch chuck can accomplish the same thing but, if you're making duplicates a pot chuck is a real asset.
« Last Edit: January 31, 2017, 05:23:42 PM by mklotz »
---
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Online crueby

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Re: Zee's Shop Beginnings
« Reply #67 on: January 31, 2017, 06:05:37 PM »
Thanks for the tips guys! There are a couple of parts coming up on my build where they will come in handy.

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Zee's Shop Beginnings
« Reply #68 on: January 31, 2017, 10:20:38 PM »
Blast you Jim. You got me thinking on those PM lathes.

I came across the PM1022V. Looks enticing.

The G0752 10x22 that I was noodling on is $1795 with freight of $109 all the way from Springfield, MO.
The PM1022V 10x22 is $1899 plus $199 freight and $49 for lift-gate. A bit more...($150-ish) but...
The PM has power cross feed, QC tool post included, and a slightly lower speed. I'm thinking wow.
They're in Pittsburgh, less than 5 hours away. Might be able to save on freight at expense of gas, but I wouldn't have to worry about freight damage.
For $100 more I can get the 10x30 (not that I would ever need it).
110V which I would prefer.

That would seem to give me everything I want but I'm still trying to understand collet chucks.

What do you think?

So some questions...

I'm thinking I want a 5C. I can use the same collets in the spindexer no? And the square and hex holders no?
Why would I consider other collet types? There are various and numerous. I don't understand the differences really except that a single collet in one type allow a small range of material while the 5C needs to be near spot on. No?

And then the more troubling issue is attaching a collet chuck. It sounds like I would need to get/make a backing plate.
If it has to be threaded then I'm in a bit of trouble as I don't have that skill yet (if ever).

PM says the spindle is MT4 internal taper, 1" bore, and direct mount. Does direct mount mean bolted?

Thanks all. Pile in please.

And blast you Jim.
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Online crueby

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Re: Zee's Shop Beginnings
« Reply #69 on: January 31, 2017, 10:41:10 PM »
I don't know about the lathe, but the 5C collets themselves are interchangeable between the different holders/spinners. I have a set with the hex/square holders, work great with those.

For the lathe maker that is close to you, can you go look at one and get some hands-on with it to see what its like in person? Thats always a useful thing.

Other than that, I'm ducking out of the way before the pile-on lands...!

Offline Flyboy Jim

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Re: Zee's Shop Beginnings
« Reply #70 on: January 31, 2017, 10:44:01 PM »
Blast you Jim. You got me thinking on those PM lathes.

I came across the PM1022V. Looks enticing.

And blast you Jim.

Always happy to help out where I can!  :lolb: :ROFL: :LittleDevil:

Jim
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Online crueby

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Re: Zee's Shop Beginnings
« Reply #71 on: January 31, 2017, 10:47:51 PM »
Blast you Jim. You got me thinking on those PM lathes.

I came across the PM1022V. Looks enticing.

And blast you Jim.

Always happy to help out where I can!  :lolb: :ROFL: :LittleDevil:

Jim
Its fun to help spend someone elses money, isnt it!   :LittleDevil:

Offline 10KPete

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Re: Zee's Shop Beginnings
« Reply #72 on: January 31, 2017, 10:54:19 PM »
Carl, I have been staying out of this fracus but now I have to pitch in:

Go with the 5C collets. They are standard the world over and fit damn near everything of any size.

For the extra $100 you will never be sorry. Take it from a guy who's spent a lot of time in front of a lathe. If you have a 10" lathe you'll need to turn an 11" part. You'll always need a bigger lathe. You can't predict what you will want to do...

The powered cross feed is a standard feature for any lathe I would own. Wouldn't do without it.

You WILL use the slower speed!! If for nothing else, threading. Yeah I know you don't know if you will do any. But believe me, once you have the capability you will use it and then wonder how you ever lived without it.

Same for the longer bed. You WILL use it someday. It's a real enhancement for little money.

Yeah it all adds up but you'll have a machine that won't stop you.

Oh, and make sure the 10" machine has at least 1/2 hp motor.

Now I need to go and bake some mint chocolate cookies for Chris. I'll let him tell you why!

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Offline Flyboy Jim

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Re: Zee's Shop Beginnings
« Reply #73 on: January 31, 2017, 10:55:30 PM »
Blast you Jim. You got me thinking on those PM lathes.

I came across the PM1022V. Looks enticing.

And blast you Jim.

Always happy to help out where I can!  :lolb: :ROFL: :LittleDevil:

Jim
Its fun to help spend someone elses money, isnt it!   :LittleDevil:

I know. You all have help me spend a lot of mine.  :shrug:

Jim

PS: Zee........why don't you give Matt a call at Precision Matthews and tell him what you want to do and get his input. He has a reputation for being pretty helpful that way.

PSS: Being able to go get it yourself would be great! It'd save on the usual shipping damage.
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Offline mklotz

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Re: Zee's Shop Beginnings
« Reply #74 on: January 31, 2017, 11:08:23 PM »
5Cs are widely available, come in all sorts of varieties including hex and square and specials (like pot chucks, expanding and emergency collets) and are easy to find used.  They come in round sizes from 1/16 to 1-1/8.

A 1" spindle bore seems a bit small to me but I guess these are smaller lathes than I have.  If you decide on a drawbar type collet chuck, ensure that the spindle bore can swallow the required drawbar.

You're going to have to learn to thread at some point.  Don't disregard that requirement in deciding on a lathe.

Do these lathes use (spit) change gears?  If so, you'll be sorry.  Get a QC box if at all possible.

Don't size the lathe by the engine projects you think now you'll want to make.  Size it by the tool projects you may want/need to make to feed your ever broadening field of engine modeling.  The lathe should be able to make all the lathe and mill accessories you've seen people building on this and other model engineering fora.

Nur meine Gedanken.
---
Regards, Marv


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