Author Topic: Zee's Shop Beginnings  (Read 73743 times)

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Zee's Shop Beginnings
« Reply #675 on: September 04, 2017, 07:32:21 PM »
Zee, if it were me I would put both in the high position. That overlaps almost all of the low position speeds except for the very lowest ones and you can always switch to low speed for something like threading on the lathe when needed. That's just my two cents though.

Bill

Offline mklotz

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Re: Zee's Shop Beginnings
« Reply #676 on: September 04, 2017, 08:10:08 PM »
Mill: 100 to 1250 and 200 to 2500.
Lathe: 50 to 1000 and 100 to 2000.

I know there are times a very slow speed is desirable but I don't know if the slowest at high is sufficient.

One way to get a feel for the speeds might be to look up the SFM for the materials you work most frequently and plug them into the equation that connects speed (RPM) and SFM to find the diameter you could/should machine at the recommended SFM.

DIAM = (12/Pi) * (SFM/RPM)

For example, with a material with recommended SFM = 100, your 100 to 2000 RPM yields a spread of...

D100 = (12/pi) * (100/100) = 3.8"

D2000 = (12/pi) /20 = 0.19"

Nothing cast in concrete, of course; we all ignore SFM and adjust speed "by ear" but it will give you a feel.
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Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Zee's Shop Beginnings
« Reply #677 on: September 04, 2017, 08:53:26 PM »
Thanks Bill. Pretty much what I was thinking.

Thanks Marv.
So at high speed for small diameter stuff (or drilling I would imagine) and low speed for larger flywheels.
This was helpful. Thanks.


Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline crueby

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Re: Zee's Shop Beginnings
« Reply #678 on: September 04, 2017, 08:59:01 PM »
Thanks Bill. Pretty much what I was thinking.

Thanks Marv.
So at high speed for small diameter stuff (or drilling I would imagine) and low speed for larger flywheels.
This was helpful. Thanks.
and low speed for parting tool operations...

Offline mklotz

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Re: Zee's Shop Beginnings
« Reply #679 on: September 04, 2017, 11:03:24 PM »
Thanks Marv.
So at high speed for small diameter stuff (or drilling I would imagine) and low speed for larger flywheels.

Yes, another equation that should be scratched on the inside of the lenses of your safety glasses.

SFM [surface feet per minute] = (DIAM [inches] *pi/12 [inches per foot]) * RPM [revolution per minute]

Values for SFM differ but I'll list the ones I used in my  SPEED program...


Code: [Select]
entries show SFM range

ALUMINUM AND ALLOYS 200  300
BRASS AND SOFT BRONZE 100 300
LOW CARBON STEEL 80 150
MEDIUM CARBON STEEL 60 100
HIGH CARBON STEEL 50 60
TOOL AND DIE STEEL 40 80
ALLOY STEEL 50 70
MALLEABLE IRON 80 90
SOFT CAST IRON 100 150
MEDIUM CAST IRON 70 100
HARD CAST IRON 40 60
COPPER 60 80
HIGH TENSILE BRONZE 70 90

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Offline Kim

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Re: Zee's Shop Beginnings
« Reply #680 on: September 04, 2017, 11:04:29 PM »
Hey Zee,
Just to give you another opinion...

I think I'd start with leaving them BOTH in the low speed setting.

In the 4 years I've had it, I've only used my lathe in anything higher than 800 RPM a few times.  I use the slower speeds for drilling (depending on size 100-400) and parting (100-200).  The highest speed I use with any regularity is 800 RPM for brass.  Most steel seems to work best for me at 300, to 500 RPM.

And I always use my lowest setting (70 RPM) for threading.

Maybe people will tell me I'm wrong, but that's what seems to work best and give me the best finish and least chatter.


On the mill, the lowest speed I have is about 250, and I wish I had something slower.  I notice it most when using a slitting saw.  I just have to be really careful or the saw will bog down and stop - it gets so full of chips.  I think when calculating the correct speed for a 4" slitting saw, in steel, it is more like 100 RPM, but I can't go there.  So I use 250 and just try to go really slowly.  It works, but if I had lower, I'd use it.

Just my experience.  And as I said, maybe I"m doing it wrong.

Whatever you set it at, I'm sure in a few months, you'll find the place you like to leave it most of the time - either high or low.  It would be interesting to know what you decided on.

Kim

 

Online Jasonb

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Re: Zee's Shop Beginnings
« Reply #681 on: September 05, 2017, 07:37:29 AM »
Zee like Kim I have only once put my similar 11x27 lathe  into high speed as I find having the very slowest 50rpm far more useful than the top end.

On other big factor is that to get down to 100rpm in the high range the motor will be running at its slowest setting which will mean it has less torque and also if running very slowly for  along time the motor fan is not turning fast so you will have minimal cooling when the lathe is likely to be under high load.

I would also fortget the published speed charts particularly when working on larger diameter work. These variable speed lathes do loose torque as the speed drops unlike a geared or fully belt driven machine so can be stalled with an average depth of cut on something like a flywheel. So the better option is to use the low range and let the motor run faster, use a fast machining speed but take a slightly shallower cut.

J

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Zee's Shop Beginnings
« Reply #682 on: September 05, 2017, 10:35:20 PM »
Thanks guys. Much appreciated.
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline 10KPete

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Re: Zee's Shop Beginnings
« Reply #683 on: September 05, 2017, 11:00:10 PM »
Just to reassure you, Zee, my SB 10K spends most of it's time on the big motor pulley and the center spindle pulley. Between that and back gear It covers 90% of my needs....

You aren't alone my friend!!!

Pete
Craftsman, Tinkerer, Curious Person.
Retired, finally!
SB 10K lathe, Benchmaster mill. And stuff.

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Zee's Shop Beginnings
« Reply #684 on: October 02, 2017, 12:01:26 AM »
Hi. Been a while. Going to be a while. But meanwhile...

I've been putting the shop (and house - which has a higher priority with respect to T) in order but having quite a bit of enjoyment setting up shop.

I'm figuring retirement is between Jan 2 and May 11.

Jan 2 means I get the year-end bonus.
May 11 means I turn 65 the next day. (For Americans it means eligible for Medicare.)
Any day after means I want to alleviate any fear T has about running out of money.

Unless I get pissed off. Then retirement is any day between now and pissed-off day.
Ah! Now the question is whether I call it retirement day or pissed-off day.  :lolb:

You may recall I got a LulzBot Mini 3D printer and have used it a lot to print out tool holders, a coaster for my coffee, some stuff for my robot project.
I'm pretty happy with it. Pretty much as advertised...out of the box. I haven't tried messing with the settings. Draw it, print it...fun.

In the meantime, I've been learning what I can about my new machines. Truthfully, I haven't done much with them. Getting interrupted every 30 minutes is not helpful.

One of the things that bugged me about the mill is the lack of a spindle stop. If you use the tool to hold the spindle, and the tool to loosen the drawbar...your cutter (or whatever) will drop to the table.

I came across NeilWNC's youtube where he printed a spindle stop. His is bigger...my printer doesn't go that big...so I made my own.

Yet to be tested. Just noting the possibilities when you add a 3d printer to your shop.

P.S. I have been reading the forum. What a fun group.

Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Zee's Shop Beginnings
« Reply #685 on: October 02, 2017, 12:55:24 AM »
Hi Zee. You will likely beat me  to retirement...I am shooting for the end of May at this point. Always good to see you post, even if its just a come and go thing. Glad things are getting organized in the new shop too.

Bill

Offline wagnmkr

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Re: Zee's Shop Beginnings
« Reply #686 on: October 02, 2017, 01:30:39 AM »
Hey Zee ... glad things are coming along. I agree with your thoughts on the 3d printer. It is handy to have. I just made a bunch of extra bobbins for the spinning wheel, and I am making some stuff for the aquariums as well.

Hope your retirement is soon and that you enjoy it.

Tom
I was cut out to be rich ... but ... I was sown up all wrong!

Offline crueby

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Re: Zee's Shop Beginnings
« Reply #687 on: October 02, 2017, 01:34:52 AM »
Good to hear that things are moving forward well, looking forward to seeing the projects roll out! First up, the Stanley?!

Offline Stuart

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Re: Zee's Shop Beginnings
« Reply #688 on: October 02, 2017, 07:33:36 AM »
The only problem when you retire from w**k is that you do not have enough time in the day , you think how the ekk did I find time go to w**K

I stopped when I was 50 now at 70plus I have no regrets I was doing 12 hour day and nights inc Xmas day for a UK bank computer centre facilities eng

Get those machine into use before the guarantee runs out



My aim is for a accurate part with a good finish

Offline paul gough

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Re: Zee's Shop Beginnings
« Reply #689 on: October 02, 2017, 08:25:48 AM »
Zee, Bill and anyone else, in 'retirement' time proceeds at the square of what it did when you are employed, also when you have forgotten work you eventually begin to notice the approach of total and permanent redundancy. Get on to the things that are meaningful, don't waste even one day of your new freedom. None of your life is refundable!!! Regards, Paul Gough.