Author Topic: (re)building shop  (Read 1979 times)

Offline wdeputy

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(re)building shop
« on: November 07, 2016, 08:16:19 PM »
My 8 1/2 foot by 10 1/2 foot shop has evolved over the last few years.  It's been a collection of what's readily available or already on hand.  The time came to make new benches and generally clean things up.  The plan is to have a new mill by next summer so that was considered in the remake.  There is actually more storage space than before and you can't have too much.

Offline Nick_G

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Re: (re)building shop
« Reply #1 on: November 07, 2016, 11:38:36 PM »
.
Looking all sorted and organised.

I wish my workshop was so tidy.  ;D

Nick

Online steamer

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Re: (re)building shop
« Reply #2 on: November 08, 2016, 12:47:47 AM »
Nice shop!!!

Dave
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Online b.lindsey

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Re: (re)building shop
« Reply #3 on: November 08, 2016, 12:50:06 AM »
That looks fantastic deputy...well organized and neat as a pin. Now go make something and mess it up some  :naughty:

Bill

Offline Don1966

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Re: (re)building shop
« Reply #4 on: November 08, 2016, 12:51:05 AM »
Very nice setup for the space you have...... :ThumbsUp:

Don

Offline gerritv

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Re: (re)building shop
« Reply #5 on: November 08, 2016, 01:17:22 AM »
Very organized, and still wall space for more shelves for the inevitable expansion.

Programming is like a Hit-n-Miss engine

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: (re)building shop
« Reply #6 on: November 08, 2016, 01:17:40 AM »
Nice cozy (well organized) shop you have there!


Dave

Offline wdeputy

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Re: (re)building shop
« Reply #7 on: November 08, 2016, 03:49:02 AM »
Being inside the house it's always usable. Now, to have both time and energy at once...

Walt

Online Zephyrin

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Re: (re)building shop
« Reply #8 on: November 08, 2016, 08:34:10 AM »
I have most of these tools, but how come that my own shed looks so untidy, I'm dreaming to work in such a cosy place !
Zephyrin
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Offline Chipswitheverything

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Re: (re)building shop
« Reply #9 on: November 08, 2016, 09:16:06 AM »
Hi Walt, very attractive and well ordered workshop, what are you thinking of making in there now it is so nicely sorted out?  ( There must be a bit of swarf in there somewhere?? ! )   Dave

Offline Kim

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Re: (re)building shop
« Reply #10 on: November 08, 2016, 04:13:59 PM »
Very nice!  Thanks for showing us around your shop!
Kim

Offline wdeputy

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Re: (re)building shop
« Reply #11 on: November 08, 2016, 05:40:50 PM »
Dave,
Now it's time to get back to the hit and miss that has been in the works for a while.  Being such a small space and in the house means that cleanup is a regular thing.  The shop vacuum is a must-have tool.  Besides, the shop cats will track everything around!

Walt

Online Roger B

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Re: (re)building shop
« Reply #12 on: November 08, 2016, 08:57:56 PM »
Very nice  :ThumbsUp:  :ThumbsUp: What make is your little bench drill? It looks similar but not identical to my Proxxon one.
Best regards

Roger

Offline wdeputy

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Re: (re)building shop
« Reply #13 on: November 08, 2016, 09:46:22 PM »
Roger,
The drill press is from MicroMark and has been in use for a long time.  Drilled lotsa holes, it has.

Walt

Offline wdeputy

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Re: (re)building shop
« Reply #14 on: June 26, 2017, 01:26:21 AM »
This is part two of the shop re-make.  The first new machine turned out to be a lathe.  After a great deal of looking and reading, I settled on the Little Machine Shop 3540 lathe.  At 8 1/2 by 20, it just fit into the available space.
I picked up the lathe at the trucking depot and brought it home in the truck.  The cardboard box on top of the crate contains some accessories that were ordered at the same time.  LMS ships everything ordered with a new machine for the same charge as just the machine!

Arrival by D Carson, on Flickr

Once off the truck the crate was removed to see what was there.  The crate was too big to fit between the legs of the engine hoist so it was temporarily supported with a floor jack.

Uncrated by D Carson, on Flickr

Everything except the headstock was removed to make it easier to get into the house.  It was still a heavy bit of iron.  It was strapped onto a large two-wheeler foir the trip down the stairs.

Lighter Load by D Carson, on Flickr

A co-worker assisted in getting the lathe into the house.  He also lifted the heavy end to get it onto the chip tray sitting on the bench.

In The Shop by D Carson, on Flickr


Walt

Online b.lindsey

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Re: (re)building shop
« Reply #15 on: June 26, 2017, 01:33:39 AM »
Nice looking lathe Walt. Those pull out drawers under the lathe tray will certainly come in hand too!!  Keep us posted on your progress.

Bill

Offline wdeputy

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Re: (re)building shop
« Reply #16 on: June 26, 2017, 03:53:35 AM »
Hi Bill.  The top drawer is about half full of holders for the QCTP.  It’ll be a very handy place for the commonly used tools and such.
I made a few minor changes on the machine.  The gib screws were slotted head with jam nuts.  They were replaced with SHCS.  The ends of the new screws were ground to match the originals.

Gib Screws by D Carson, on Flickr

The front gibs (referred to as “press plates” in the parts book) were held in by some screws that were loose fitting in the saddle.  There was also a carriage lock (“bridled press plate”) that was just to the side of the right-hand gib.  That piece was very loose and would likely torn out of place during use.  Access was also tight as it was right next to the cross slide.  This shows the pieces sitting in their respective positions but on top of the saddle.

Original Gibs by D Carson, on Flickr

I made new gibs and a new lock plate.  Both sides were replaced and the #10 screws fir the holes nicely without modification of the saddle.  The position of the gib and lock plate were swapped on the right side of the saddle.  A slide-handle bolt was made so the carriage can be locked without the use of a tool.

New Gibs by D Carson, on Flickr

Everything was made from MOH (material on hand) thith the exception of the SHCSs.  A few other minor things, a good cleaning and lubing, addition of a DRO and we’re ready to make swarf.

Ready to Cut by D Carson, on Flickr

Looking at the chip tray, the lathe is bolted to two pads that sit about an inch above the tray.  Those openings and the area at the bottom of the casting looked like perfect habitat for shop gnomes.  I could envision parting off something and having it disappear in there forever, or until a replacement was made.  Some dense foam lying around solved that issue.  Now, onward.  Hopefully, a new milling machine this fall.

Gnome Guards by D Carson, on Flickr

Walt