Author Topic: AOG's version of the Liney 5  (Read 3820 times)

Online AOG

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AOG's version of the Liney 5
« on: October 23, 2016, 11:06:48 PM »
It's time for a new build. I decided that I was going to build one of the Liney engines. I have been going back and forth between the Liney 5 and the RV-2. The Liney 5 has a somewhat complicated shape but the RV-2 requires gear cutting. I know I could buy the gears but that defeats the purpose. I have come to the decision that I am not ready to tackle gears yet so the Liney 5 it is.



(Pic from www.ministeam.com)

The first thing to tackle is the main frame. Which is the most complex part to make. I pulled out my engineering notebook and sketched out a preliminary machining plan. I realized I could do this on the rotary table with the tooling plate mounted. I designed a quick fixture to mount to the tooling plate that would keep the part correctly indexed on the rotary table after I milled out the center. I started by drilling a pair of mounting holes spaced so that I could mount it on the tooling plate. The center hole was counterbored so that when I cut out the center I could feel breakthrough.



Then using the DRO I drilled, counterbored and tapped holes where the part mounting holes would be.



The fixture was mounted to the rotary table.



Next I squared up the blank and then I face milled it flat. The rough outline of the part was then laid out and the mount holes were drilled. I tried to mount the blank to the fixture and ran into my first problem.



I screwed up when I transferred the dimensions from the plans to my fixture. I unmounted the blank and drilled and tapped a hole in the correct place on the fixture. I remounted the blank and drilled and countersinked the five mounting holes. That's when I discovered my second problem. The holes in the tooling plate are in line radially but offset from the x-y axis by 2-3 degrees. That meant that only one of the holes lined up with the fixture well enough to start a screw. It also means that all of my scribed lines were out. From that point on I had to do everything based on the coordinates instead of milling to the lines. I drilled the first set of holes. Then I rotated the table and redid them four more times. I messed up one hole so I had to plug it and redrill.  Drilling the holes left me in this state.



Then I milled out the form for each of the five segments.



Next I repositioned the clamps and removed the center mounting screw. The center was milled to dimension. I was worried that the single brass screw wouldn't hold but everything turned out ok.



The part was removed from the waste stock and the holes were tapped.



After a day of filing and clean up I am left with this.



Till next time

Tony




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Offline b.lindsey

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Re: AOG's version of the Liney 5
« Reply #1 on: October 23, 2016, 11:15:01 PM »
Wow, already off to a fine start!! Looking forward to your build log on this one.

Bill

Offline crueby

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Re: AOG's version of the Liney 5
« Reply #2 on: October 23, 2016, 11:43:25 PM »
Nice job! That is quite a complex shape. 

Online AOG

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Re: AOG's version of the Liney 5
« Reply #3 on: October 27, 2016, 03:14:52 PM »
I got some shop time these last few evenings so I carried on with the project. The next part to be made was the vertical stand. I laid it out on the blank.



Then I drilled out the center hole big enough to take one of the pivot pins for my round over tool.



The bottom was then drilled and tapped for the mounting hardware.



Next I milled away the excess stock to make rounding over easier.



The round over tool was mounted inn the vise and the end rounded.



The part was then flipped and the side notches cut in.



The hole was taken to the final dimension and the end was drilled and tapped for a setscrew.



The part was aligned in the vise so that the scribed line was parallel with the jaws and the edges were milled to the lines. Then the part was cleaned up by filling. (Sorry, all I got was a nice picture of my thumb) The next part was the crankshaft. The profile was turned first.



Then the end was drilled and tapped.



The crankshaft was parted off and the other end cleaned up.



Then over to the mill where the hole for the crank pin was drilled.



The crank pin was locktited into place completing the part. Here is a family shot.



Till next time.

Tony


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Offline b.lindsey

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Re: AOG's version of the Liney 5
« Reply #4 on: October 27, 2016, 04:56:43 PM »
More nice progress Tony. You are moving along quickly on this project!!

Bill

Offline kev

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Re: AOG's version of the Liney 5
« Reply #5 on: October 27, 2016, 06:27:10 PM »
made a few of the Liney engines and been thinking about this one so very interesting thank you :)

Offline wagnmkr

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Re: AOG's version of the Liney 5
« Reply #6 on: October 27, 2016, 07:46:37 PM »
Looking Good so far. You have reminded me that I have a set of these plans around here, as well as the Liney "Halo".

Tom
I was cut out to be rich ... but ... I was sown up all wrong!

Online AOG

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Re: AOG's version of the Liney 5
« Reply #7 on: November 01, 2016, 04:19:01 PM »
Time for another update. The next thing on the list is the parts for the manifold assembly. The hub started as a piece of brass that was turned to the major diameter.



Then the minor diameter was turned and the part moved to a collet chuck. My initial intention was to turn the air manifold groove on the lathe. Unfortunately I didn't pay enough attention to the geometry on my tool and it dug in and ruined the part.



Lack of attention to detail is a killer. So after remaking the blank I decided to skip the groove and just drill and ream the center hole.



Next I turned up an alignment bushing and mounted the part on my rotary table. Then I drilled and tapped the mounting holes.



Using an slot drill, I cut the air manifold.



Next I needed to drill the ports for the cylinders. I tried to set up my spindexer but that cheap piece of Chinese junk wouldn't close the collet. These collets work fine in my collet chuck so I think something is wrong with the geometry. In the end I took advantage of the fact that the mounting holes were 180 degrees out from the port holes to drill the ports.



That completes the hub but I really need to get a proper dividing head. Next I made the five flanges. I cut and squared up the blanks. Then I centered up on the part and setup a stop for repeatability. The two mounting holes were made and the port drilled half way.



The part was rotated 90 degrees and the air port drilled to intercept the other port.



With those done I cut four pieces of tube to connect the pieces. The fifth side contains the air inlet. I drilled a piece of square stock and then turned the ends round.



Then I drill and tapped a center hole to accept an air fitting.



I'll end with a current family shot.



Till next time.

Tony


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Offline b.lindsey

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Re: AOG's version of the Liney 5
« Reply #8 on: November 01, 2016, 05:50:24 PM »
More good progress Tony. The completed parts are starting to add up now :)

Bill

Online AOG

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Re: AOG's version of the Liney 5
« Reply #9 on: November 08, 2016, 04:15:50 PM »
This weekend was a struggle. Very much three steps forward and two steps back. Let's start with the forward steps. The next parts were the cylinders. I did five of them and they were all made this way. First I chucked up the blank in the four jaw. Then I faced the part to length and turned the lower end round.



The bore was drilled and reamed.



Then a decorative chamfer was added to the end.



The bore was then lapped.



Next it was over to the mill where the ports and the pivot holes were drilled.



Next up were the pivot pins. The ends were drilled, threaded and then cut to length.



It was then time for solder fest. I soldered the pivot pins into the cylinders and then cleaned up the parts. And then I ran into problems. I attempted to solder the intake manifold assembly together. Initially all of the components were mounted onto the frame to set the spacing. Unfortunately my torch just couldn't put out enough heat to make the joints. The frame was acting like a heatsink. The result was a disaster. I burned up my flux and got solder in the tubes and made an all around dog's breakfast of the part. Every time I tried to "fix" something I made it worse. In the end I decided to cut my losses and remake the parts. For the next attempt, the design will be modified so that the tubes are threaded into the flanges and manifold rather than soldered. I need to go order some more material so I'll leave you with a family shot that includes the twisted remains of my first attempt at the intake manifold.



Till next time

Tony
 


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Offline Don1966

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Re: AOG's version of the Liney 5
« Reply #10 on: November 08, 2016, 04:46:47 PM »
Very nice work Tony and nice progresss...... :ThumbsUp:


Don :popcorn:

Offline Tennessee Whiskey

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Re: AOG's version of the Liney 5
« Reply #11 on: November 08, 2016, 07:18:04 PM »
Well Tony,  sometimes the dogs have to eat too.  I'm sure after this "practice round " the next time will go smoothly.  It pretty much takes me three tries to do anything : one to test the setup,  once to get the dimensions right,  hopefully,  just hopefully,  the third time is the charm.

Cletus

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: AOG's version of the Liney 5
« Reply #12 on: November 08, 2016, 11:24:35 PM »
The family is growing Tony  :) Very nice !!

Bill

Online AOG

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Re: AOG's version of the Liney 5
« Reply #13 on: November 10, 2016, 04:26:57 AM »
Thanks everyone. I got the bar stock I needed to redo the intake manifold today. I'll take care of that first then I'll get back on making the pistons.

Tony

Online AOG

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Re: AOG's version of the Liney 5
« Reply #14 on: November 14, 2016, 04:01:37 PM »
The next part to to be made were the slave rods. After making the blanks, I chucked them into the self centering four jaw and turned the piston end round.



Then it was over to the mill to drill out the holes.



Next I turned up a set of filing buttons and hardened them. I used them to radius the ends of the rods.



Then the rods were slotted in the mill. I didn't have the right size slitting saw so I used a 1/16 two flute endmill to make the cuts.



Then the material for redoing the intake manifold came in so I spent a couple of nights getting that finished. The process was the same as last time with the exception of threading the parts so I didn't take any pictures. With that out of the way it was time to start the master rod. I marked out the limits and drilled the holes.



Then I spent all of Saturday afternoon filing the master rod to shape.



I expected the frame to be the toughest part of this project but it was nothing compared to making the master rod. The small size meant that it was an old school cut, file and fit job. I did notice a mistake in the plans. The callout for the blade that fits into the piston is smaller than the hole size by a significant margin. I upsized mine to match the piston size. Next up were the pins that hold the slave rods to the master. They were profiled and cut off.



Then the slave rods were assembled to the master and the ends of the pins staked.



Now for some pistons for the rods. The pistons were turned to sized and received their oil groove.



Then for four of the five pistons the center holes were drilled.



The piston for the master rod posed something of a problem. The plans call for making the holes in all five pistons the same (I.E. round) but the master rod is made from flat stock. I guess that would work if I was planning on soldering the parts but I'm using Locktite 638. As I result I chose to slot the piston in the mill instead.



Here is a family shot with the new manifold and finished piston assembly (minus the crankshaft).



Till next time

Tony



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