Author Topic: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine  (Read 296121 times)

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #945 on: March 11, 2017, 10:45:48 PM »
Hey Bill/etc, those with Sherline lathes:
While making up a stern cone fitting for an RC submarine, I needed to use the boring bar on the compound slide to turn the inner surface of the cone. Turns out, the way the compound is designed for turning on the back side and with no hieght adjustment, the bar was way too high up since it is not a normal 1/4" cutter. So,
whipped up this little adapter:

so I could turn with the bar in the compound slide:

Very simple adapter, something to keep in mind if you ever need it.


« Last Edit: June 05, 2018, 05:31:16 PM by crueby »

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #946 on: March 12, 2017, 12:53:21 AM »
Nice idea on the adaptor.

It's often too easy to get stuck looking at a tree and not the forest.
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
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Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #947 on: March 12, 2017, 01:11:50 AM »
Nice idea on the adaptor.

It's often too easy to get stuck looking at a tree and not the forest.
Thanks. I would SO love to spend some time in Sherlines back room with some of their engineers. So many little things that could be upgraded and improved at no cost.

Offline Walsheng

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #948 on: March 12, 2017, 02:37:56 AM »
Nice idea on the adaptor.

It's often too easy to get stuck looking at a tree and not the forest.
Thanks. I would SO love to spend some time in Sherlines back room with some of their engineers. So many little things that could be upgraded and improved at no cost.

Wasn't Sherline set up at Names last year?  Maybe a Sunday afternoon conversation with them!

John

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #949 on: March 12, 2017, 02:45:07 AM »
Chris, I have the compound as well and it does work but it is not one of the better thought out accessories. No height adjustment as you note, but also the lack of any type gib, and it will move some vertically when cutting. I find it rather loose overall. Nice work on the adapter though!

Bill

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #950 on: March 13, 2017, 09:04:55 PM »
The last day or so has not seen much done on the hauler, been working on one of the RC submarines instead. Today I did spend the afternoon modelling up more of the engine. Last time I got up through the crankshaft, today was all spent on the stephenson linkages and all the control rods and brackets. LOTS of parts there!
Here is a rendering of it:


« Last Edit: June 05, 2018, 05:31:33 PM by crueby »

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #951 on: March 14, 2017, 08:19:22 PM »
Okay, shifted gears today ( :facepalm: ) and got back to the differential bearing blocks.

Started with two lengths of square bar in the mill vise, long enough to get all four block sets out of, spot drilled

and drilled

for the mounting bolts, then drilled clearance size through the top bar only

and then bolted the bars together and stamped a number on each half to keep the pairs together later on. They should be all the same, but I didn't do this on an engine once, they had a little variance (always do), and got mixed up. Was a royal pain to try the combinations till it ran smooth again.

For the bearings, started with some bearing bronze rod, drilled

and bored out to size (I like to bore holes for running shafts, better results than just drilling)

and then turned down the outside to size - it looks thin, but the real ones were too, and this is 1/12th that size.

Rather than try the parting tool, which I was worried might bend the thin walls, I used the turning tool to mark the lengths of the bearings

and then used a small thin hacksaw to part them off while turning.

Just left a small bur that a file knocked off pretty quick. Here is a test fit on the half shaft:

The bearing blocks were then turned sideways in the mill vise, and starter holes were drilled and then got out the boring head to take them up to match the bearings

Here the holes are done, you can see one of the bearings slipped into the hole on the left

Next up will be to saw the blocks apart, and then clean up the ends with the mill. After that, it will be time to drill the holes in the mounting plate and get the bearings in place.
The last things to do on the differential will be to get it mounted to the engine bed rails, and also I need to make the sheet metal cover that hides all that nice gear work...   :hellno:
« Last Edit: June 05, 2018, 05:31:40 PM by crueby »

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #952 on: March 14, 2017, 09:14:43 PM »
Was using the turning tool to mark the bearings in order to provide a starting point for the hacksaw?
How did you account for the width of the hacksaw?

 :popcorn:
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
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Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #953 on: March 14, 2017, 09:25:59 PM »
Was using the turning tool to mark the bearings in order to provide a starting point for the hacksaw?
How did you account for the width of the hacksaw?

 :popcorn:
Exactly. It gave an indent for the blade to ride in without skating. The width was not critical, I filed them smooth and to width. The tool mark was about the width of the blade, which was dumb luck.

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #954 on: March 14, 2017, 09:49:34 PM »
Was using the turning tool to mark the bearings in order to provide a starting point for the hacksaw?
How did you account for the width of the hacksaw?

 :popcorn:
Exactly. It gave an indent for the blade to ride in without skating. The width was not critical, I filed them smooth and to width. The tool mark was about the width of the blade, which was dumb luck.

Shhhhhh. It is always by design.

I have two many rules at work:

1) First see if the bug can be made a feature.
2) Answer all why questions with 'by design'.

 :lolb:
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #955 on: March 14, 2017, 10:30:20 PM »
Was using the turning tool to mark the bearings in order to provide a starting point for the hacksaw?
How did you account for the width of the hacksaw?

 :popcorn:
Exactly. It gave an indent for the blade to ride in without skating. The width was not critical, I filed them smooth and to width. The tool mark was about the width of the blade, which was dumb luck.

Shhhhhh. It is always by design.

I have two many rules at work:

1) First see if the bug can be made a feature.
2) Answer all why questions with 'by design'.

 :lolb:
My first real boat (a wonderful 12' Whitehall row/sailboat, built by Shew and Burnham in Maine), was named 'Dumb Luck'.

And on the one project we did with Java as the main engine, we called everything a 'Java bug, we can't fix that'.  :atcomputer:

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #956 on: March 14, 2017, 10:49:33 PM »
Was using the turning tool to mark the bearings in order to provide a starting point for the hacksaw?
How did you account for the width of the hacksaw?

 :popcorn:
Exactly. It gave an indent for the blade to ride in without skating. The width was not critical, I filed them smooth and to width. The tool mark was about the width of the blade, which was dumb luck.

Shhhhhh. It is always by design.

I have two many rules at work:

1) First see if the bug can be made a feature.
2) Answer all why questions with 'by design'.

 :lolb:
My first real boat (a wonderful 12' Whitehall row/sailboat, built by Shew and Burnham in Maine), was named 'Dumb Luck'.

And on the one project we did with Java as the main engine, we called everything a 'Java bug, we can't fix that'.  :atcomputer:

Another rule of mine...if it's not my bug...it's a bug.  ;D

Ah...to be fair...I'm where I am with a wonderful family out of sheer dumb luck (as well as on some by design on her part).
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
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Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #957 on: March 15, 2017, 08:47:24 PM »
Catching up on the differential plate, got the mounting holes drilled for the bearing blocks:

all ran nice and smooth, so did a test fit to the engine bed rails:

and then the whole assembly onto the main rails.

The assembly will be on/off a number of times as the rest of the engine is made. Next I am going to get the drive chains adjusted to length - looks like I need to add a few more of the spare links that I had made (left them a little short, easier to add more than to grind off cross pin heads and remove them).
« Last Edit: June 05, 2018, 05:32:23 PM by crueby »

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #958 on: March 15, 2017, 09:20:33 PM »
all ran nice and smooth

Were you surprised? I wasn't.  ;D
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
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Offline RonGinger

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #959 on: March 15, 2017, 09:21:42 PM »
Quote
My first real boat (a wonderful 12' Whitehall row/sailboat, built by Shew and Burnham in Maine), was named 'Dumb Luck'.

Wow, I could tell you have good taste. Dick Shew and Cecil Burnham are two of my best friends. I've known them since about 1978. I helped build their boat shop, and on more recent boats I make the brass tags with the Coast Guard required data. Sadly, they are getting pretty old now, Dick still works in the shop, but mostly in the vein of puttering. Cecil still builds a few skiffs each year for the local fishermen, and repairs some of the  whitehalls.

You should see their tug boat- about 26 feet of the finest kind. It has a feathering prop, behind a GM 6-71 diesel, turned by a coupling I made. Two pieces of durabar cast iron 6" diameter, weighed 36 pounds to start, yielded an 18 pound part.

That photo of the differential on the main rails is just outstanding. Amazing work.