Author Topic: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine  (Read 296055 times)

Offline 10KPete

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #870 on: March 02, 2017, 06:30:17 PM »
A big wad of clay around the blank will probably stop the ringing....

Pete
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Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #871 on: March 02, 2017, 07:13:18 PM »
A big wad of clay around the blank will probably stop the ringing....

Pete
Interesting idea.  The first part is trash, though its good enough for experiments. I cut down a chunk of 3/8 6061 aluminum and bolted it to the faceplate, want to see how the gear cutter works on that. I will hold off on undercutting the sides though, that was a mistake on the first part, should have worked from the outside in.

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #872 on: March 02, 2017, 10:13:41 PM »
I sure hope I didn't jinx you when I commented on boo-boos (lack thereof).

But I also know that nothing stops you.
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
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Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #873 on: March 03, 2017, 01:06:36 AM »
I sure hope I didn't jinx you when I commented on boo-boos (lack thereof).

But I also know that nothing stops you.
Nope, not at all! I can't even blame it on stinking hoppies!


I got a chunk of aluminum bolted to the faceplate with a wood spacer, and 2/3rds of the teeth cut. So far so good, will see how it works when I undercut the rim to take the center plate.

Online Flyboy Jim

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #874 on: March 03, 2017, 02:52:16 AM »
Well, step backwards time.

I did some more cutting on the gear teeth after lunch, and ran into some problems. Most of the gears I've done till now have been in brass, this is first large one I've done in steel, and with the recesses already done in the sides of the plate, I am getting vibration and ringing in the plate when making the cuts, which is causing the shaft to move very slightly and slowly in the chuck. Big problems when cutting gear teeth!
 :Mad:    :cussing:    :hammerbash:    :rant:    :toilet_claw:

So, time to remake the rim part. I'm thinking I may try and find a large chunk of brass to make it from, given the size of the teeth it should be plenty strong for the model. I do have some 6061 aluminum that is thick enough, could make it from that as well, though soldering on an axle shaft would not work on that, though I could bolt it to a faceplate...

Rethink time!

Well that's a bummer!  :wallbang: I wonder if this accessory would have stabilized the rim, so you wouldn't of had the vibration: http://sherline.com/product/3702-adjustable-right-angle-tailstock/ I've got one, but haven't had an occasion to use it yet.

Jim
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Offline Kim

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #875 on: March 03, 2017, 05:56:32 AM »
I wonder if this accessory would have stabilized the rim, so you wouldn't of had the vibration: http://sherline.com/product/3702-adjustable-right-angle-tailstock/ I've got one, but haven't had an occasion to use it yet.

I've got that accessory and it works great!  I used it when making my gears.
But then again, they were only brass.  But I found it a big help, and I think it would help for steel too.
Kim

Offline PJPickard

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #876 on: March 03, 2017, 11:26:16 AM »
If you want to stick with steel try 12L14, it cuts like butter!

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #877 on: March 03, 2017, 02:24:09 PM »
I wonder if this accessory would have stabilized the rim, so you wouldn't of had the vibration: http://sherline.com/product/3702-adjustable-right-angle-tailstock/ I've got one, but haven't had an occasion to use it yet.

I've got that accessory and it works great!  I used it when making my gears.
But then again, they were only brass.  But I found it a big help, and I think it would help for steel too.
Kim
Probably would have helped. Maybe pick one up for next time!

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #878 on: March 03, 2017, 07:03:19 PM »
Differential main gear, take two!

I restarted the gear with a disk of 6061 aluminum cut from a 3/8" thick flat bar, and bolted it to a faceplate with a plywood spacer to give room for the gear cutter. The disc was threaded for the bolts, and nuts were added for good measure. The disk was turned to size, and mounted in the mill on the rotary table to cut the gear teeth.

The need for the spacer shows in this picture - without it the cutter would have hit the faceplate.

With the center of the disc left full thickness, and the softer aluminum, there was no problem with vibration this time.   :)
After cutting the teeth, the rotary table was laid down horizontal and the inside of the rim milled out. With the bolts in place, there was not enough room for the turning tool to do this on the lathe. So, took it down to depth in several passes, then moved out to finished diameter in a few more.

Then drilled the mounting holes to match the center plate made earlier

and then turned the disk over to mill the shallow recess on the back side.

To seperate the waste center from the rim, I had to cut off the bolts so I could move the end mill in far enough, then ran a set of shallow cuts around the inside of the rim till it just broke through. As it came around to the final section, I pushed on the rim to ensure it would move over clear and not get flung by the cutter.

Success! I was surprised how light the finished rim was, am more used to the weight of brass or steel.

Cleaned up a few burs, and did a test fit with the center plate. The center plate, in steel, will keep the rim solidly in place. The reason the center plate needs to be a separate piece is that it has the axle holes for the bevel gears - when the rim is in place, the axles are kept captive.

Here is what it looks like from the back side:

and showing where it will sit under the boiler between the main frame rails:

I think next I'll make the smaller spur gear that will sit on the crankshaft and drive this large gear, then move on to the bevel gears.
« Last Edit: June 04, 2018, 01:36:59 AM by crueby »

Offline tvoght

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #879 on: March 03, 2017, 07:47:19 PM »
There are certain problems that present themselves given the relative size of your project and your equipment. I am ever impressed with your ready solutions.

Lookin` good!

--Tim

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #880 on: March 03, 2017, 08:10:35 PM »
There are certain problems that present themselves given the relative size of your project and your equipment. I am ever impressed with your ready solutions.

Lookin` good!

--Tim

Thanks Tim! Always fun to push the limits...

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #881 on: March 03, 2017, 09:11:25 PM »
And the simple gear done - the gear on the crankshaft that drives the differential is a 23 tooth module 1 spur gear with a 1/2" center hole. Started with a short length of brass bar in the 4-jaw, turned the end to size, and set up on the rotary table:

The brass is a joy to cut gears from, cuts nice and smooth, very clean finish. I pre-calculate the rotary table settings and make a list of positions to stop at so that there is no rounding errors to walk the gear teeth out as you go around on an odd advance like this one, which is 15.65217391... degrees per tooth.

After cutting all the teeth, moved the chuck back to the lathe to drill

and bore the center hole to size

before parting it off to length

for a test fit with the differential ring gear

All looks good so next time I can start on the bevel gears. These two made a good warmup for the bevels, which are a slightly more complicated process. I will be doing the bevel gear teeth with the straight tooth method from Ivan Law's book on gearcutting.
« Last Edit: June 04, 2018, 01:37:09 AM by crueby »

Offline 10KPete

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #882 on: March 03, 2017, 09:19:01 PM »
Absolutely beautiful work!! Tools are no limit in your shop...

Pete
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Online mike mott

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #883 on: March 03, 2017, 09:35:58 PM »
Very nice solution and execution of the gear cutting.

Mike
If you can imagine it you can build it

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #884 on: March 03, 2017, 09:49:09 PM »
Nicely done!  :ThumbsUp:

I'm looking forward to the bevel gear work.
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
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