Author Topic: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine  (Read 295425 times)

Online mike mott

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #855 on: February 28, 2017, 04:36:34 PM »
Thank for the information on the cutting Chris. I will be continuing through the pages some more today.

The NRG forum is the best for Model ships that I have found, a lot of very good sharing of information.

Mike
If you can imagine it you can build it

Online mike mott

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #856 on: February 28, 2017, 05:49:57 PM »
Got to page 15
Wow you work on the small lathe and mill certainly show what can be done. Your comments about taking breaks when doing repetitive work made me smile.
The tracks turned out very nicely, I shall have to try out some 303 stainless it looks like a nice material to use.

Nice beginning on the sprockets.

Mike
If you can imagine it you can build it

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #857 on: February 28, 2017, 11:17:01 PM »
I've cruised NRG from time to time.

Hey Chris...any thoughts on how to do an 18th century hull in metal.  ;D
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Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #858 on: February 28, 2017, 11:20:11 PM »
I've cruised NRG from time to time.

Hey Chris...any thoughts on how to do an 18th century hull in metal.  ;D
Sure!

Start with wood. They were not making metal ship hulls in the 1700s!

Or, rig up some CNC in that shiny new shop of yours!  Actually, I have seen some incredible ship models done in all silver. So, start with a 20 year apprenticeship with a silversmith...

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #859 on: February 28, 2017, 11:24:24 PM »
I've cruised NRG from time to time.

Hey Chris...any thoughts on how to do an 18th century hull in metal.  ;D
Sure!

Start with wood. They were not making metal ship hulls in the 1700s!

No help. No help at all.  :cussing:
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #860 on: February 28, 2017, 11:28:48 PM »
I've cruised NRG from time to time.

Hey Chris...any thoughts on how to do an 18th century hull in metal.  ;D
Sure!

Start with wood. They were not making metal ship hulls in the 1700s!

No help. No help at all.  :cussing:
None whatsoever.

How about gold leaf over wood? The outside would be metal...

Closest I ever got to making a metal boat was the bowl I made in a copper working class - looks a little like a welsh coracle. Think thats the right word - the little round boats.

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #861 on: February 28, 2017, 11:31:28 PM »
Got to page 15
Wow you work on the small lathe and mill certainly show what can be done. Your comments about taking breaks when doing repetitive work made me smile.
The tracks turned out very nicely, I shall have to try out some 303 stainless it looks like a nice material to use.

Nice beginning on the sprockets.

Mike
The 303 is very nice stuff - works sort of like brass, though not as quick a cut. Takes a nice finish, silver solders well, though I read it does not weld well, but I dont have a welding setup so no problem there. Much easier to work than some of the other alloys. I detest 304 stainless, though the one piece I tried might have been mislabeled.

Online mike mott

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #862 on: March 01, 2017, 06:10:30 AM »
Quote
Hey Chris...any thoughts on how to do an 18th century hull in metal.

Check out Gerald Wingroves stuff
http://www.wworkshop.net/Falls_of_Clyde/Menu.html

Thanks for the heads up on the 303 Chris I shall have to try some.

Mike

If you can imagine it you can build it

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #863 on: March 01, 2017, 01:09:10 PM »
Quote
Hey Chris...any thoughts on how to do an 18th century hull in metal.

Check out Gerald Wingroves stuff
http://www.wworkshop.net/Falls_of_Clyde/Menu.html

Thanks for the heads up on the 303 Chris I shall have to try some.

Mike
Wow - that is some serious work on the Clyde model!

There you go Zee, step by step of a metal hull. First project for the new shop?

As for the Lombard, I am planning on starting the differential today...

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #864 on: March 01, 2017, 10:30:24 PM »
Time to get started on cutting metal for the differential unit. As you can see from the rendering, it has a central plate that holds the outer gear ring in place. The plate is made separate so that the four bevel gear axles can be drilled down through the rim.

To start out, I cut two sections off some larger flat bar stock, the inner plate out of some .200" thick bar, and the gear blank from some .375" stock. A half inch hole was bored in each to take an axle - the one for the gear rim is just there till the gear is milled, then the center will be cut away.

After boring, a length of 1/2" round bar was silver soldered into each plate, and then set up on the rotary table to take off enough of the corners that it would spin on the lathe without hitting the bed.

Then centered up on the lathe, ready to turn the blanks down to size

First turned down the smaller center plate to diameter and trued up the sides:

then likewise with the gear plate

The recess on one side was turned in - this side is a shallow recess to form one side of the wall that the center plate sits against.

then the other side was trued up, and the deeper recess turned in on that side. This side will take the center plate. Note that the hub area is not turned down all the way, that will get cut away later so it is not important how deep that section is.

And then back over to the mill once again to drill the mount holes that will hold the center plate into the gear rim. I wanted to drill both plates with one setup to ensure that the holes matched up. First the holes drilled/tapped in the center plate edge,

then the clearance holes in the gear rim were drilled

At this point, everything is ready to set up the mill for gear cutting - the rotary table will go up vertical, like it was cutting the teeth for the steering gear parts. Not today though, I want to come at the gear cutting fresh to avoid the dreaded tired-brain brain-farts!


« Last Edit: June 04, 2018, 01:35:54 AM by crueby »

Offline 10KPete

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #865 on: March 01, 2017, 11:53:35 PM »
Those will be some nice parts! I do like your logical thinking in developing a sequence. It shows in all your work and, I think, is why you are so successful in making things.

This Lombard thing is sooooo neat!!!

Pete
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Retired, finally!
SB 10K lathe, Benchmaster mill. And stuff.

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #866 on: March 02, 2017, 12:25:02 AM »
Quote
Hey Chris...any thoughts on how to do an 18th century hull in metal.

Check out Gerald Wingroves stuff
http://www.wworkshop.net/Falls_of_Clyde/Menu.html

Thanks for the heads up on the 303 Chris I shall have to try some.

Mike

Wow - that is some serious work on the Clyde model!

There you go Zee, step by step of a metal hull. First project for the new shop?

As for the Lombard, I am planning on starting the differential today...

Won't be first project in the new shop...but wow. Nice site. Thanks Mike!!
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #867 on: March 02, 2017, 02:14:04 AM »
Those will be some nice parts! I do like your logical thinking in developing a sequence. It shows in all your work and, I think, is why you are so successful in making things.

This Lombard thing is sooooo neat!!!

Pete
Thanks Pete! Making parts from bar stock that would have been castings can be a challenge, but fun!


So glad that the Lombard came up in another thread last fall, was perfect timing for me, had been looking for something unusual for a while.

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #868 on: March 02, 2017, 04:26:23 PM »
Continuing on with the differential plates - I was going to go straight to cutting the gear teeth on the outer rim, but realized that I could use the current setup and finish the center plate first and save a setup change. So, I laid out the openings for the bevel gears and drilled corner holes for each of the four openings:

then came back with the end mill and did the long edges of each opening

then angled the table and finished off the short edges

Next step on the center plate was to flip the rotary table up vertical and drill the holes for the bevel gear axles, each centered on an opening

and finished by turning the outer ends of the axle shaft to length and diameter

Then, back to cutting gear teeth on the outer rim. I got out my handy dandy super hi tech chunk of plywood mill table extension, and set up the rotary table on that. This extension comes out whenever I am cutting teeth on larger gears, to give the reach needed  on the Y axis of the table.

First few teeth cut - I am taking each of them in several passes, the tooth depth is .0894", and the rim is .375 wide, and that seemed like too much to do in one pass. This gear will be 72 teeth, so it is one full turn on the rotary table handwheel per tooth - nice and easy to keep track of.

So, a bunch more of these to do, and I can seperate the rim off the hub - will be cut just inside the mounting holes.
« Last Edit: June 04, 2018, 01:36:15 AM by crueby »

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #869 on: March 02, 2017, 06:10:12 PM »
Well, step backwards time.

I did some more cutting on the gear teeth after lunch, and ran into some problems. Most of the gears I've done till now have been in brass, this is first large one I've done in steel, and with the recesses already done in the sides of the plate, I am getting vibration and ringing in the plate when making the cuts, which is causing the shaft to move very slightly and slowly in the chuck. Big problems when cutting gear teeth!
 :Mad:    :cussing:    :hammerbash:    :rant:    :toilet_claw:

So, time to remake the rim part. I'm thinking I may try and find a large chunk of brass to make it from, given the size of the teeth it should be plenty strong for the model. I do have some 6061 aluminum that is thick enough, could make it from that as well, though soldering on an axle shaft would not work on that, though I could bolt it to a faceplate...

Rethink time!