Author Topic: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine  (Read 295838 times)

Offline Flyboy Jim

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #825 on: February 22, 2017, 11:11:34 PM »
The steering wheel came out great, Chris. You're getting this spoke business down pat!

Now it just needs a Betty Grable steering knob! Well maybe not.............the Lombard was a little before her time.  :shrug:

Jim
Sherline 4400 Lathe
Sherline 5400 Mill
"You can do small things on big machines, but you can do small things on small machines".

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #826 on: February 22, 2017, 11:17:57 PM »
The steering wheel came out great, Chris. You're getting this spoke business down pat!

Now it just needs a Betty Grable steering knob! Well maybe not.............the Lombard was a little before her time.  :shrug:

Jim
And a Charlie Chaplin one wouldn't be the same!   :Lol:

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #827 on: February 22, 2017, 11:27:18 PM »
Geesh. I read a bunch of posts from you...and then just minutes later (it seems) there's another set.

Very nice looking steering wheel.  :ThumbsUp:

Are your elves chaffing to drive the thing?
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
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Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #828 on: February 23, 2017, 02:13:06 AM »
Geesh. I read a bunch of posts from you...and then just minutes later (it seems) there's another set.

Very nice looking steering wheel.  :ThumbsUp:

Are your elves chaffing to drive the thing?
They don't let me drive theirs, thats why I have to build one for myself!

Offline 90LX_Notch

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #829 on: February 23, 2017, 02:23:19 AM »
The family shot = speechless.

-Bob
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My Engine Videos on YouTube-
http://www.youtube.com/user/Notch90usa/videos

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #830 on: February 24, 2017, 09:22:38 PM »
And its time for some serious stainless steel whittling! The boiler front bracket is next. Its been a while since I drew it, here it is again:

I decided to make it from three pieces - two uprights, and the crossbar, silver soldered together. Each will be machined as far as possible before joining, to keep it simpler to hold in the vise. The crossbar will have some half-laps at the ends so I can screw it to the uprights for soldering. At least thats the theory, we'll see how it goes!
To start, I took some narrow bar and milled two of the corners in to form it into a T:

and then came back and put a 3/8" long notch in, to form the half-lap joint at each end. The center rib will get drilled later for the screws to hold it to the uprights for soldering.

With that done, I laid out the outlines of the uprights on some 1/2"x1" bar stock.

The bar is long enough to leave uncut material in the middle, so I can hold the ends for milling.
The next step was to recip-saw out the bulk of the material in the ends. I figured it would make the bar bend to take that much off of one side, and it did.

That is with the straighedge held down the uncut, formerly straight, side, the light gap is clearly visible. As near as I could measure, just that short cut made the ends each curl over by 0.015". This was annealed 303 stainless, but it had not been heat treated to stress relieve it, so the internal stresses put into the metal when it was rolled out at the factory caused the curve. Not a lot, but something to be aware of.
So, the next step was to clean up the inside of the cut on the mill,

and then I took a light pass on the outside to take it back to level with the rest of the bar, so I could measure in for the final thickness. I set the mill to just touch at the start of the curved area, and ran it out to the end, could see it taking a deeper cut farther out. When done, nice and straight again.

So, back to taking the inside back to final dimension,

and then notching the ends for where they fit over the frame rails.

and notching the inner end for the mating half of the joint to the crossbar

Here is the crossbar held to where it will go:

With the main profile of the legs shaped, it was time to start notching in the sides from both sides - the cross section of the bracket is a large T shape everywhere.

and same from the other side

and then the wider area above the frames

Here are the parts so far

and how it will fit to the frame rail

Next will be to do that area just above the crossbar. The curved section at the very top where it fits to the boiler will be done with the part held onto a plate on the rotary table. But, thats enough for one day, time to go get a cookie and relax...

« Last Edit: June 04, 2018, 01:33:14 AM by crueby »

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #831 on: February 24, 2017, 11:45:49 PM »
Got a guy at work interested in Sherlines.
He couldn't believe what was available and their size.

But he doesn't believe me when I say, "Yes. They can carve steel".

(I didn't tell him that 'They' are elves.)
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #832 on: February 25, 2017, 12:00:27 AM »
Got a guy at work interested in Sherlines.
He couldn't believe what was available and their size.

But he doesn't believe me when I say, "Yes. They can carve steel".

(I didn't tell him that 'They' are elves.)
Well, show him the pics from this build, should be proof that the sherline can cut steel just fine! Maybe not in as deep a cut as quickly as a full size Bridgeport, but it gets there!


And yes, I must be an elf. From a long line of them from Thuringen and elsewhere. Only related to the silly Keebler ones in that we like cookies, but ours are naturally better!

Offline Kim

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #833 on: February 25, 2017, 06:00:21 AM »
That's a very sharp looking steering wheel Chris!  Are you going to add a knob? (with our without Betty Grable? :))

And all your fab work on the boiler bracket is looking mighty fine too!
Kim

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #834 on: February 25, 2017, 02:01:15 PM »
That's a very sharp looking steering wheel Chris!  Are you going to add a knob? (with our without Betty Grable? :) )

And all your fab work on the boiler bracket is looking mighty fine too!
Kim
I looked at a bunch of vintage pictures of these, no sign of knobs on any of the steering wheel rims. Not even any Babe The Blue Ox figures from the rear view mirrors!

Offline Flyboy Jim

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #835 on: February 25, 2017, 03:58:32 PM »
That's a very sharp looking steering wheel Chris!  Are you going to add a knob? (with our without Betty Grable? :) )

And all your fab work on the boiler bracket is looking mighty fine too!
Kim
I looked at a bunch of vintage pictures of these, no sign of knobs on any of the steering wheel rims. Not even any Babe The Blue Ox figures from the rear view mirrors!

One of your posted videos of running the restored Lombard shows two guys reefing on that steering wheel. No steering knobs for them.  Must of been a real bear to steering that thing.

Good work on that frame. I like how you will bolt it together for silver soldering. Filed that one away.

Jim
Sherline 4400 Lathe
Sherline 5400 Mill
"You can do small things on big machines, but you can do small things on small machines".

Offline Don1966

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #836 on: February 25, 2017, 06:01:10 PM »
But, thats enough for one day, time to go get a cookie and relax...

Must be a lot of energy in those cookies Chris with this non stop work. I am thinking you must of worked for Santa at one time or another seeing as how you don't come up for air very often..... :lolb:
But hey Dog the work is great and following your work is remarkable....

Don

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #837 on: February 25, 2017, 07:16:14 PM »
That's a very sharp looking steering wheel Chris!  Are you going to add a knob? (with our without Betty Grable? :) )

And all your fab work on the boiler bracket is looking mighty fine too!
Kim
I looked at a bunch of vintage pictures of these, no sign of knobs on any of the steering wheel rims. Not even any Babe The Blue Ox figures from the rear view mirrors!

One of your posted videos of running the restored Lombard shows two guys reefing on that steering wheel. No steering knobs for them.  Must of been a real bear to steering that thing.

Good work on that frame. I like how you will bolt it together for silver soldering. Filed that one away.

Jim
From the stories I've heard/seen, it was the worst in fresh snow, better when they were in a iced track. The steering wheel has a pretty good gear reduction to it, but there is still an awful lot of weight from the front of the machine on the skids. I saw pics from the museum when they had a truck scale under the front axle. With an empty boiler, it was over a ton on the front axle. Gotta be a lot more with a full load of water in the boiler and the saddle tank. The whole machine loaded up was something like 30 tons.

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #838 on: February 25, 2017, 07:18:53 PM »
But, thats enough for one day, time to go get a cookie and relax...

Must be a lot of energy in those cookies Chris with this non stop work. I am thinking you must of worked for Santa at one time or another seeing as how you don't come up for air very often..... :lolb:
But hey Dog the work is great and following your work is remarkable....

Don
Yeah, well, mentioned that on an earlier post, used to work at North Pole Inc., till the ... um, incident ... big food fight in the elf cafeteria, a bloody nosed reindeer, bad things written on the toys, some jokes about a big fat boss, you know how it goes...   :ROFL:

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #839 on: February 26, 2017, 12:45:18 AM »
Got some more whittling done on the boiler bracket. Started out by continuing on at the upper half, drilling out the inner curve and milling the recess

and continuing on around the outsides

After doing as much milling as possible, I sawed the uprights out from the longer bar, leaving the curved section a little thick

and then drilling the mount holes to the frame rails

and clamping the crossbar in place to drill and tap it for some 2-56 screws, starting with a long center drill to spot the location

and then the tap drill. The holes were tapped with the bar still clamped in place, no clearance drilling, since the parts are so thin I just tapped right on through the joint.

at which point it was ready for some screws and then silver soldering

After soldering, the screws were milled off flush

The last milling operation is to round the curved sections at the top to fit the boiler tube. This part is way too large to spin on the Sherline faceplate, so I bolted a thick piece of plywood to a faceplate and mounted it up on the rotary table. After some layout lines, careful measuring, and clamping in place, it was ready to mill.

Several light passes, and the inner faces were done. Then moved out and took the outer edges of the pads to shape as well.

Then a couple holes for the mounting bolts into the firebox,

and its ready for paint!

The tops of the firebox need a few tweaks to get everything to lay in smooth, but pretty good fit overall.



A bit of paint and the bracket can be bolted on to the frame for real.
Next, I need to take some time to 3D model up the differential unit, and also get started on the engine layout. Fortunately for the engine itself, I have copies of profile drawings from the University from when they rebuilt the real one, so I can get a lot of detail measurements from there. The differential is an interesting beast, laid out differently from a modern car one in that the drive comes in from an upper gear, driving a larger lower gear with four bevel gears held within it to drive the output shafts. The lower gear is held in place by bearings on the output shafts.



frame to hold bevel gears:

half output shaft for one side





« Last Edit: June 04, 2018, 01:34:17 AM by crueby »