Author Topic: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine  (Read 295247 times)

Offline crueby

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8989
  • Rochester NY
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #810 on: February 21, 2017, 05:48:39 PM »
Got the first side and end plates done up, and joined together:


« Last Edit: June 04, 2018, 01:32:01 AM by crueby »

Offline Johnmcc69

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 503
  • Erie Pa., USA
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #811 on: February 21, 2017, 08:47:33 PM »
Just beautiful work Chris! I'm learning a lot just from your posts & everybody's input.

 What a great build & documentation!

 John

Offline Don1966

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5997
  • Morgan City, LA (Along the Gulf Coast)
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #812 on: February 21, 2017, 10:28:39 PM »
Just down right awesome Dog! Your making me envious of your work........ :praise2:


 :drinking-41:
Don

Offline crueby

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8989
  • Rochester NY
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #813 on: February 21, 2017, 10:35:32 PM »
Thanks guys! This build is a lot of fun, gotten to the point where every part is really changing the appearance. I got the other panels done on the firebox, more pics tomorrow.

Offline b.lindsey

  • Global Moderator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13686
  • Dallas, NC, USA
    • Workbench-Miniatures
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #814 on: February 22, 2017, 12:06:12 AM »
Looks great Chris, I admire your patience with all those rivets too!!

Bill

Offline crueby

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8989
  • Rochester NY
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #815 on: February 22, 2017, 02:00:37 AM »
Looks great Chris, I admire your patience with all those rivets too!!

Bill
With the rivet tool they only took a couple hours, and look great. Good practice for the saddle tank, all the seams are riveted. Going to make the flanges wider so I can use the tool up to the corners.

Offline crueby

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8989
  • Rochester NY
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #816 on: February 22, 2017, 04:20:27 PM »
I got the other sides riveted up last night, only difference from doing the first sides was that for the final seams, a bar was held in the vise to rivet against:

I got lucky here this week, the weather has been unusually warm for this time of year, we are in the upper 60s heading for 70s, so I took all the recent parts outside for some paint rather than stinking up the house. Here is how its all looking now:






And to show a bit of where it is going, I set the raw boiler tube on top for a look. The front end is roughly where the front of the smokebox will be, and obviously it has not been cut to length, so it is hanging out over the back of the firebox quite a ways, but you get the idea. Half the firebox gets covered by the cab, and the top of the boiler by the saddle tank later on.




If the stock for the front boiler support does not show up, I am going to start on the steering wheel next.
« Last Edit: June 04, 2018, 01:32:17 AM by crueby »

Offline Flyboy Jim

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1546
  • Independence, Oregon
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #817 on: February 22, 2017, 04:35:15 PM »
Wow Chris............what a difference a little paint makes! This bad boy is starting to get some bulk.

As a side note, that "Dust Deputy" in the background looks interesting. What kind of vacuum do you have it hooked to? Does it separate out swarf before it goes to your vacuum?

Jim
Sherline 4400 Lathe
Sherline 5400 Mill
"You can do small things on big machines, but you can do small things on small machines".

Offline crueby

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8989
  • Rochester NY
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #818 on: February 22, 2017, 06:14:24 PM »
Wow Chris............what a difference a little paint makes! This bad boy is starting to get some bulk.

As a side note, that "Dust Deputy" in the background looks interesting. What kind of vacuum do you have it hooked to? Does it separate out swarf before it goes to your vacuum?

Jim


Those Dust Deputy attachments are great. You put it on a 5 gallon bucket with a rim of plywood to stiffen the lid, and hang it on the side of a shop vac. I have a small 5 gallon vac. It seperates out all the dust and swarf, nearly nothing makes it to the vac anymore, except for the occasional bit of paper. Pop the lid and you can dump the bucket, the shopvac filter stays clean so it doesn't bog down. I use the same setup in my wood shop, same results there too, all the fine dust to big chunks separate out before the vacuum. With the vac and bucket on a set of wheels it all moves together. These work much better than the older lid type ones, same principle as the dyson vacs, just much much bigger cyclone unit.

Offline wagnmkr

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 661
  • Lindsay, Ontario, Canada
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #819 on: February 22, 2017, 08:39:57 PM »
Hmmmm ... looks like that puppy will be on the road in a couple of weeks!

Tom
I was cut out to be rich ... but ... I was sown up all wrong!

Offline Flyboy Jim

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1546
  • Independence, Oregon
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #820 on: February 22, 2017, 09:31:37 PM »
Wow Chris............what a difference a little paint makes! This bad boy is starting to get some bulk.

As a side note, that "Dust Deputy" in the background looks interesting. What kind of vacuum do you have it hooked to? Does it separate out swarf before it goes to your vacuum?

Jim




Those Dust Deputy attachments are great. You put it on a 5 gallon bucket with a rim of plywood to stiffen the lid, and hang it on the side of a shop vac. I have a small 5 gallon vac. It seperates out all the dust and swarf, nearly nothing makes it to the vac anymore, except for the occasional bit of paper. Pop the lid and you can dump the bucket, the shopvac filter stays clean so it doesn't bog down. I use the same setup in my wood shop, same results there too, all the fine dust to big chunks separate out before the vacuum. With the vac and bucket on a set of wheels it all moves together. These work much better than the older lid type ones, same principle as the dyson vacs, just much much bigger cyclone unit.

Thanks for the info, Chris. I'm going to look into getting one. l've been hesitant to vacuum up swarf and then have to deal with it in the vacuum filter. Sounds like one would take care of that issue.
Sherline 4400 Lathe
Sherline 5400 Mill
"You can do small things on big machines, but you can do small things on small machines".

Offline crueby

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8989
  • Rochester NY
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #821 on: February 22, 2017, 10:14:01 PM »
Wow Chris............what a difference a little paint makes! This bad boy is starting to get some bulk.

As a side note, that "Dust Deputy" in the background looks interesting. What kind of vacuum do you have it hooked to? Does it separate out swarf before it goes to your vacuum?

Jim




Those Dust Deputy attachments are great. You put it on a 5 gallon bucket with a rim of plywood to stiffen the lid, and hang it on the side of a shop vac. I have a small 5 gallon vac. It seperates out all the dust and swarf, nearly nothing makes it to the vac anymore, except for the occasional bit of paper. Pop the lid and you can dump the bucket, the shopvac filter stays clean so it doesn't bog down. I use the same setup in my wood shop, same results there too, all the fine dust to big chunks separate out before the vacuum. With the vac and bucket on a set of wheels it all moves together. These work much better than the older lid type ones, same principle as the dyson vacs, just much much bigger cyclone unit.

Thanks for the info, Chris. I'm going to look into getting one. l've been hesitant to vacuum up swarf and then have to deal with it in the vacuum filter. Sounds like one would take care of that issue.
I've been very happy with it - like you say, it solves the swarf-in-the-filter issues, and works very well. Only issue I've had is if I make the mistake of trying to vacuum up the long twisty shavings, they clog the vac hose itself.

They make a couple versions of these things, a cheaper plastic one and a heavier duty metal one. I have one of each, the metal one is up in the wood shop - went with it figuring that I would swing a long heavy board into the plastic one and break it someday. Both are identical in shape and function. They also make a larger version for big commercial shops with a bigger vac system. Also, they offer the buckets, but you can get them real cheap at the home center. Get two buckets, bolt one to the side of the vac, and use it as a holster to hold the other one. A plywood ring to stiffen the lid of the bucket helps a lot, keeps it from getting sucked inside the bucket.

I use a standard shopvac hose set with them, with the large crevice tool on the end to suck up chips around the machines. Oh, and if cutting steel, let the chips cool a few minutes first so you dont melt them into the plastic!! Naturally, all the manufacturers have changed their hose sizes just that little bit so they dont fit each other, you can always take a wrap of duct tape on narrow ends to make them hold.

You can buy them from a catalog place like Woodcraft, or direct from the maker. Search for the name, they have a website. Check around first, the prices vary a LOT. Some places charge crazy prices. Even at best, not cheap for a molded piece of plastic, but it works really well, I've had them for 10 or 15 years with no problems.

For the record - I have no connection to them at all (wish I had invented the thing!). Just a happy user.

Offline crueby

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8989
  • Rochester NY
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #822 on: February 22, 2017, 10:16:16 PM »
Hmmmm ... looks like that puppy will be on the road in a couple of weeks!

Tom
Yup, probably THIS weekend.

When I take it over to show my mother the progress, that is!

 :lolb:

Offline crueby

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8989
  • Rochester NY
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #823 on: February 22, 2017, 10:29:33 PM »
After a couple hours outisde on the front porch in the rocker, reading (it was near 70 today, February in upstate NY, go figure!), I finally went in and made the steering wheel. After way more time trying to decide how to make it than it took to make the silly thing, I decided to try turning and milling the wheel as one piece rather than coming up with a way to solder it. So, started with a chunk of bar stock, and turned it to 1.25" with a small hub, and used the parting tool to back cut the thickness of the rim while it was still solid. I used a file to round the corners on the rim.

Then over to the rotary table, and milled out the spokes with a 1/8" end mill.

and after hacksawing it off the bar (did not trust the parting tool on the thin spokes with interrupted cuts), held it in the lathe by the hub to clean up and detail the top side

then a couple minutes with a rounded file to knock off the corners of the spokes, it was ready for a test fit on the steering shaft:

All looks good, so a bit of paint and some loctite to hold it in place comes next. The steering shaft is free to lift out of the lower bracket, which will make it easy to remove it when opening the front cover on the boiler. This is needed, since lighting the butane burner in the boiler is much simpler if the front inspection cover is swung open.

« Last Edit: June 04, 2018, 01:32:46 AM by crueby »

Offline crueby

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8989
  • Rochester NY
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #824 on: February 22, 2017, 10:57:10 PM »
After finishing up in the shop, looked out front and the steel I was waiting for to make the boiler support was there, so that is back on for tomorrow!


Oh boy oh boy....   :cartwheel: