Author Topic: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine  (Read 298977 times)

Offline crueby

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9319
  • Rochester NY
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #735 on: February 12, 2017, 08:57:38 PM »
Well, one good thing about a day with freezing rain, rain, then snow - makes you want to stay in a nice warm shop and build something!

I have a good start on the front axle frame. Since it needs a 1/8" radius groove down the bottom edge, and I dont have a ball end mill that size, I took another route to the same result: started with a slightly wider piece of bar stock, and drilled a 1/4" hole lengthwise through it near what will be the bottom edge.

Then I marked out the shape of the frame on the side of it, using the top of the axle hole as a reference

First step to getting that shape, drill the holes for the pivot and for the ends of the tapered side openings (they were just there in the original to reduce the thickness of the cast frame, plus I think they look great)

And then turned it upright and milled in the top surface, plus the lower flats where the nuts on the u-bolts will go. The u-bolts wrap around the axle bar and hold it to the frame.

To mill the angled surfaces, I used the tops of the holes in the side to line up the frame in the vise - this surface will be parallel to the opening.

Then it was just a matter or making a series of shallow cuts till the flat connected the other features. Same cuts were made on the opposite end.

A quick check to make sure it clears the upper bracket:

and started milling out the openings in the side. I started by drilling one more hole to remove the bulk of the material, then connected the bottoms of the holes

To do the angled cut at the top, I used the flats to position the part, and a square bar set in the v-groove of the vise to hold it in position. At first that was just a 'what the heck, try it' move, but once clamped down it was remarkably secure, so I went ahead and made the cuts, which saved the time to position the vise at an angle.

With all the upper works cut to shape, last milling operations were to cut away half of the axle hole

and cut the recesses down the side, leaving posts where the u-bolts will be

Here are the parts so far, ready to drill the holes for the u-bolts, and also I still need to pin the bottom bracket onto the quadrant shaft.

Very happy with how that whole assembly is coming together - a few more days and the skids should be on. I also will be making a set of wheels for running on non-snow surfaces. The skids will be put on for display times.
« Last Edit: June 04, 2018, 01:27:56 AM by crueby »

Offline Flyboy Jim

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1651
  • Independence, Oregon
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #736 on: February 13, 2017, 02:50:48 AM »
Those skids might come in handy back in your country right now, Chris!

I bet that piece took a lot of thought in order to keep from machining yourself into a corner!  :shrug:

Jim

PS: Ate my last cookie today.  :LickLips:  :'(

Sherline 4400 Lathe
Sherline 5400 Mill
"You can do small things on big machines, but you can do small things on small machines".

Offline crueby

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9319
  • Rochester NY
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #737 on: February 13, 2017, 02:58:53 AM »
Those skids might come in handy back in your country right now, Chris!

I bet that piece took a lot of thought in order to keep from machining yourself into a corner!  :shrug:

Jim

PS: Ate my last cookie today.  :LickLips: :'(
The bad snow so far has gone south and east of here, only about an inch on the ground here today, but they are predicting several more inches worth tonight and tomorrow. Nice thing about retirement, when the going gets tough, stay home!

It did take some planning on the order of milling, just like the bracket above it did the other day. Fortunately it is large enough to leave plenty to grab onto.

P.S. - send a man some cookies, he eats for a couple days. Send him the recipe and he can make his own!!   :Lol:   Check post 301 in this thread!   :stir:

Offline Flyboy Jim

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1651
  • Independence, Oregon
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #738 on: February 13, 2017, 03:20:37 AM »

P.S. - send a man some cookies, he eats for a couple days. Send him the recipe and he can make his own!!   :Lol:   Check post 301 in this thread!   :stir:

So what happened to: "Send a man some cookies, he eats for a couple days. Get tired of him whining about being out of cookies and send him some more"!  :shrug:

OK..........I give............got the recipe printed out.  :LickLips:

Jim
Sherline 4400 Lathe
Sherline 5400 Mill
"You can do small things on big machines, but you can do small things on small machines".

Offline crueby

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9319
  • Rochester NY
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #739 on: February 13, 2017, 03:35:44 AM »
...
So what happened to: "Send a man some cookies, he eats for a couple days. Get tired of him whining about being out of cookies and send him some more"!  :shrug:
Sounds too much like some of the 'logic' from my working days!   :paranoia:

Key item on the recipe is mint baking emulsion, dont use the normal mint extract or it just bakes off and leaves no flavor behind.

Great. Now I'm hungry!

 :cheers:

Offline Steamer5

  • Global Moderator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1141
  • The "Naki" New Zealand
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #740 on: February 13, 2017, 04:37:38 AM »
OH YES!
Look real good now!

 :popcorn: :popcorn: :popcorn: :popcorn:

Cheers Kerrin
Thanks!



But now I have a hunger for some popcorn....

Been & checked the field & it's coming along, may be a bit late as summer comes & goes! Not looking good for camping next week!

Cheers Kerrin
« Last Edit: February 13, 2017, 05:18:04 AM by Steamer5 »
Get excited and make something!

Offline Kim

  • Global Moderator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3755
  • Portland, Oregon, USA
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #741 on: February 13, 2017, 05:04:22 AM »
Ye-gads! I'm off line for a few days and you have Six pages of updates!  :o  And not all of them are food related either.  You made a lot of progress on your steering!  And great work it is too!  You don't take a break!  I have NO idea how you get so much done so quickly.  I can't even keep up with the build, much less make this kind of actual forward progress on a project! :)
Looks amazing Chris,  :popcorn:
Kim

Offline crueby

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9319
  • Rochester NY
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #742 on: February 13, 2017, 12:53:59 PM »
Ye-gads! I'm off line for a few days and you have Six pages of updates!  :o  And not all of them are food related either.  You made a lot of progress on your steering!  And great work it is too!  You don't take a break!  I have NO idea how you get so much done so quickly.  I can't even keep up with the build, much less make this kind of actual forward progress on a project! :)
Looks amazing Chris,  :popcorn:
Kim
It just takes practice, prectice, percatise,... Rats! I mean Practize!


Sigh, better go practice some more....!  :Lol:


The last couple of snowy/rainy days kept me inside, lots of shop time. I am still trying to decide how to make the steering wheel, may skip and come back to it later. Thin rim and spokes, needs to handle heat being near smokebox so soft solder is out...

Offline crueby

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9319
  • Rochester NY
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #743 on: February 13, 2017, 05:43:12 PM »
This morning I was looking at the front axle frame, and decided it was a little too chunky, so I went back and milled some more off the top and bottom surfaces to thin it up:

I also drilled the holes to take the u-bolts that hold the axle bar in place:

Then I made up the u-bolts themselves. The middle ones started as 1-3/4" lengths of 3/32" bar, with the ends turned down and threaded 2-56. The outer bolts were the same, just 1-1/4" long.

Then the u-bolts were heated with a torch and bent around the axle so the ends came out roughly even, then everything bolted up.

The tips of the middle u-bolts were trimmed off above the nuts so they would clear the upper bracket. Also, I made up the hinge pin for the upper bracket. It has a small hole on the other end to take a cotter pin when it is all assembled after painting. The drawbar pin is also in place now.

Next step is to thread the ends of the axle bar for the nuts to hold the skids/wheels in place, then I can start on the skids.

« Last Edit: June 04, 2018, 01:28:21 AM by crueby »

Offline b.lindsey

  • Global Moderator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13760
  • Dallas, NC, USA
    • Workbench-Miniatures
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #744 on: February 13, 2017, 05:47:43 PM »
Best start getting those gnomes biceps in shape too Chris if they are going to be able to steer this thing :) Cookies alone might not be enough... :lolb:

Bill

Offline crueby

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9319
  • Rochester NY
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #745 on: February 13, 2017, 05:50:24 PM »
Best start getting those gnomes biceps in shape too Chris if they are going to be able to steer this thing :) Cookies alone might not be enough... :lolb:

Bill
I caught one of them with a bottle of steroids and a brochure from the local gym!

Offline b.lindsey

  • Global Moderator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13760
  • Dallas, NC, USA
    • Workbench-Miniatures
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #746 on: February 13, 2017, 06:34:41 PM »
Better hide the credit cards then or they may all sign up at the gym... :ROFL:

Bill

Offline crueby

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9319
  • Rochester NY
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #747 on: February 14, 2017, 01:58:28 AM »
I got the ends of the axle threaded (1/4-32) and a set of nuts made from hex bar:

Then, one more set of parts for the day - the brackets that hold the skids to the axle are started. They began as a pair of chunks of stainless steel, squared up and mounted in the 4-jaw in the lathe to turn in the protruding bosses on either side

and to drill the axle holes

Then the parts were moved over to the mill to nibble away at the shape of the lower mounting arms. I started by drilling the curves under the upper ends, and some extra holes along the bottom to remove the bulk of the material

and then milled to shape. The bar across the bottom is there for support for now, it will be removed later, leaving the two 'legs' coming down to the skids.

Then sawed away the upper corners

and milled the tops of the feet

before taking them to the disc/belt sander to shape the outer surfaces of the legs

Then it was time to saw out the bar across the bottom, and sand that cut smooth

Here they are test fit on the axle, just need to drill the holes to mount them to the skids:

Getting close to having the hauler stand up for itself!

« Last Edit: June 04, 2018, 01:28:29 AM by crueby »

Offline Flyboy Jim

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1651
  • Independence, Oregon
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #748 on: February 14, 2017, 02:48:55 AM »
Great progress, Chris. I think I see wood carving experience coming into play here.

Jim
Sherline 4400 Lathe
Sherline 5400 Mill
"You can do small things on big machines, but you can do small things on small machines".

Offline crueby

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9319
  • Rochester NY
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #749 on: February 14, 2017, 02:55:12 AM »
Great progress, Chris. I think I see wood carving experience coming into play here.

Jim
Probably right! See the animal inside the block, set it free!


If I could just get the chisels to work on stainless....