Author Topic: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine  (Read 295421 times)

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #690 on: February 08, 2017, 10:44:51 PM »
Nice looking gears Chris! The front end stearing gear will add a lot to the model too!

Bill
« Last Edit: February 08, 2017, 11:08:11 PM by b.lindsey »

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #691 on: February 08, 2017, 10:58:03 PM »
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #692 on: February 08, 2017, 11:04:37 PM »
Suggestions anyone?

Yes.


 :facepalm2:


Thanks Zee.


Oh, you better check behind the couch, one of your shop elves got sick...

Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #693 on: February 08, 2017, 11:21:15 PM »
Great work. Cutting gears is such a rewarding experience---But I still find myself holding my breath when I make that final rotation of the rotary table, and see that I'm cutting air, not metal.

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #694 on: February 09, 2017, 12:44:37 AM »
Suggestions anyone?
Yes.
:facepalm2:
Thanks Zee.
Oh, you better check behind the couch, one of your shop elves got sick...

Is okay. I'm used to puke-age.

@Brian...Nice tip. I don't know that I would've thought to go one more and see that it's accurate. Thanks. Could eye-ball the last one but this would be proof.
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #695 on: February 09, 2017, 02:05:58 AM »
Suggestions anyone?
Yes.
:facepalm2:
Thanks Zee.
Oh, you better check behind the couch, one of your shop elves got sick...

Is okay. I'm used to puke-age.

@Brian...Nice tip. I don't know that I would've thought to go one more and see that it's accurate. Thanks. Could eye-ball the last one but this would be proof.


But then Murphy's Law would kick in, mess up that last turn, and ruin the good first cut!


I do like using the 4 jaw chuck since it has the groove to lock it to the table, have had the 3 jaw turn a little during gear cutting since it doesn't have the groove around the base.

The real fun will be doing all the bevel gears for the differential, 2 large and 4 small ones.

Offline Flyboy Jim

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #696 on: February 09, 2017, 03:03:39 AM »

I do like using the 4 jaw chuck since it has the groove to lock it to the table, have had the 3 jaw turn a little during gear cutting since it doesn't have the groove around the base.

The real fun will be doing all the bevel gears for the differential, 2 large and 4 small ones.

Now there's a tip that I'll file away. That never occurred to me.   :Doh:

The gears look good. Thanks for documenting the process. That's a skill that's still out there for me to learn.

Jim

Sherline 4400 Lathe
Sherline 5400 Mill
"You can do small things on big machines, but you can do small things on small machines".

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #697 on: February 09, 2017, 08:32:16 PM »
A bunch more done today on the steering gear, got started on the quadrant arm. It is the lever arm that has a 1/4 of a gear out at the end, and turns the front axle assembly. It will have a short axle section out the top, and have a fitting to hold the axle on the bottom. Rather than try and carve it out of a larger block, I am making it from several pieces. The first two are the vertical axle and the horizontal arm. The arm starts out as a 1.6" square piece of 3/16" thick bar stock, drilled and bored to take the axle.

The rough shape of the finished quadrant was drawn on the bar stock so you can see where this is going (and so I could make sure I was drilling in the right place!).  Then a length of 1/2" round bar was turned down at one end to fit the hole, and it was ready for silver soldering together.

While I had the torch set up outside (and it is COLD out there today), I also soldered up the angle brackets on the engine beds, and then milled off the heads of the screws used to hold them in place, as well as trueing up the top surface to the top of the engine beds.

Back on the quadrant, here it is also soldered up and ready for shaping.

The corner was sawn off so that it will clear the lathe bed.

With it chucked up in the 4-jaw on the lathe, one end of the axle was smoothed down, and one face of the arm trued up as well.

It needed a slow speed and light cuts, being out of balance and an interrupted cut. Next the rim was taken down to finished diameter:

and the face shaped with a wider rim and narrower inside that.

Then, turned it around in the chuck, and recentered it using a dial indicator mounted to the cross slide

The axle was used to do the centering, and also did a quick check on the rim of the arm to make sure that was running true as well.
Then, trued off that face and shaped it like the first:

Then, got out the indicator again, rechucked it with the thicker side of the axle in the chuck so it would be as rigid as possible, and moved out so that there would be clearance from the rim to the chuck for the gear cutter.

Then back over to the mill to cut the gear teeth.
This is one place where the stock Sherline does not have enough travel on the mill table - with the rotary table clamped to the table, there is not enough reach to do larger gears, so it is necessary to get out my trusty old table extension, a very high tech piece of thick plywood with rows of holes drilled in it! This lets me move the rotary table farther out to give room for the gear and cutter. The same setup has done gears for several clocks as well as the rim gear for the Corliss build.



Then, just like the smaller gears, its cuttin' time! With the number 7 cutter, for 55 to 134 tooth gears, mounted on the arbor, the cutter was centered on the quadrant axle, and set for the proper depth of cut (.0594"). This gear is a section of a 96 tooth gear, so it is just 3.75 degrees per tooth. On the Sherline table, that is 37.5 ticks on the handwheel, so it worked out to a sequence of cuts at handwheel settings of 0, 37.5, 25, 12.5, and back around again. Here it is with the first few teeth cut,

and all cut

and big relief time, check with the small spur gear and it meshes nicely!

Next up will be to shape the sides of the quadrant, need to figure out a setup to cut reverse arcs into the sides, and round off the base around the axle. Then a tapered support arm goes across the arm on the bottom side..
« Last Edit: June 04, 2018, 01:26:19 AM by crueby »

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #698 on: February 09, 2017, 10:12:14 PM »
Worked out the curves on the sides of the quadrant gear. By offsetting the chuck on the rotary table, there was enough still on the table to grab securely with the angle clamps. It took a little trial and error to get the alignment and distance figured out, but it did not take too long.

Then it was just a matter of making a series of shallow cuts while cranking the rotary table back and forth, moving the mill table out a bit each pass.

Once the first side was done, I drew a line on the rotary table surface around the rim of the chuck, loosened up the clamps, and rotated the chuck 90 degrees, to get the second edge in position.

and cut that arc as well.

Next time, I'll center the chuck on the table again, switch to a wider mill cutter so I can get close to the axle, and round the edge around the axle.
« Last Edit: June 04, 2018, 01:26:35 AM by crueby »

Offline Flyboy Jim

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #699 on: February 10, 2017, 04:15:13 AM »
Pretty darn impressive Chris. That's a lot of things to take into account to have it all work out. Well done.

Just to clarify my thinking. You mentioned that this gear (1/4 section) was based on a 96 tooth gear, requiring 3.75 degrees rotation for each tooth. OK, I'm assuming that would be for that particular radius of the 1/4 gear, so the tooth spacing came out right. If the quadrant had been a larger radius, would you have had to figure a larger tooth gear and thus had a smaller rotation of the RT for each tooth.......in order to have the tooth spacing work out correctly? Hope that makes sense.

Jim
Sherline 4400 Lathe
Sherline 5400 Mill
"You can do small things on big machines, but you can do small things on small machines".

Offline Steamer5

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #700 on: February 10, 2017, 07:57:32 AM »
Nice Chris!

Cheers  Kerrin
Get excited and make something!

Offline Roger B

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #701 on: February 10, 2017, 10:31:12 AM »
I do like that 4 jaw chuck with the clamping groove  :ThumbsUp:  :ThumbsUp:
Best regards

Roger

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #702 on: February 10, 2017, 01:48:51 PM »
Pretty darn impressive Chris. That's a lot of things to take into account to have it all work out. Well done.

Just to clarify my thinking. You mentioned that this gear (1/4 section) was based on a 96 tooth gear, requiring 3.75 degrees rotation for each tooth. OK, I'm assuming that would be for that particular radius of the 1/4 gear, so the tooth spacing came out right. If the quadrant had been a larger radius, would you have had to figure a larger tooth gear and thus had a smaller rotation of the RT for each tooth.......in order to have the tooth spacing work out correctly? Hope that makes sense.

Jim
If I am thinking of what you are thinking correctly about my thinking, then yes!
For a given gear cutter module (or DP) size, there is a specific tooth size and spacing. So, if you want a certain number of teeth you can calculate the diameter of the gear. Likewise, if you want a given diameter, you can calculate the number of teeth it would need. In my case, I counted the number of teeth in the gears on the real one from photos, ran the math, and got lucky that I have a cutter set that works. Otherwise I would have had to redo the number of teeth on all the gears, or buy another cutter set.

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #703 on: February 10, 2017, 01:53:35 PM »
I do like that 4 jaw chuck with the clamping groove  :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp:
I just wish they had changed two things.
1, made the clamp so that it would fit square on the table without hitting the front mount screws on the vertical holder base.
2, made the t slots on the rotary table the same depth as the ones on the mill table. The rotab slots are farther from the surface, so the chuck to table adapter won't fit on the rotary table.
But, it still can be made to work!
Oh, and item 3, put a slot around the 3 jaw chuck too!

Offline Flyboy Jim

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #704 on: February 10, 2017, 03:03:23 PM »
Pretty darn impressive Chris. That's a lot of things to take into account to have it all work out. Well done.

Just to clarify my thinking. You mentioned that this gear (1/4 section) was based on a 96 tooth gear, requiring 3.75 degrees rotation for each tooth. OK, I'm assuming that would be for that particular radius of the 1/4 gear, so the tooth spacing came out right. If the quadrant had been a larger radius, would you have had to figure a larger tooth gear and thus had a smaller rotation of the RT for each tooth.......in order to have the tooth spacing work out correctly? Hope that makes sense.

Jim

If I am thinking of what you are thinking correctly about my thinking, then yes!
For a given gear cutter module (or DP) size, there is a specific tooth size and spacing. So, if you want a certain number of teeth you can calculate the diameter of the gear. Likewise, if you want a given diameter, you can calculate the number of teeth it would need. In my case, I counted the number of teeth in the gears on the real one from photos, ran the math, and got lucky that I have a cutter set that works. Otherwise I would have had to redo the number of teeth on all the gears, or buy another cutter set.

Thanks for the answer, Chris. Yes.......you were correctly thinking that I was thinking what you were thinking.  :shrug: I have a book on Gears and Gear cutting. I'm now thinking that if I were to read more than the first 6 pages, I would have an even better idea of what you're thinking.  :hammerbash:
 
Do you think that having the Tooling Plate for the RT would of made your set up any easier? http://sherline.com/product/3725-5-rotary-table-tooling-plate/

Jim
Sherline 4400 Lathe
Sherline 5400 Mill
"You can do small things on big machines, but you can do small things on small machines".