Author Topic: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine  (Read 296153 times)

Offline paul gough

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #585 on: January 22, 2017, 09:16:19 PM »
Just got back from my second sojourn up north, (Asia). I have been catching up on the posts of your build and have to say I'm astonished at what you are/have achieved. I think you are certainly a master of the miniature machine tool, and obviously know these tiny Sherlines intimately, it appears you can get almost anything you need out of them. I am pretty sure you would fill a large hole in the model engineering publication offerings by doing a 'How To Build a Lombard with Micro machines' or some such. The fact that you are making something out of the ordinary and using very small equipment might be a very attractive proposition to many potential model makers who like a book on the bench to follow and who don't have the resources for Cazeneuves, Hardinges and suchlike. Regards, Paul Gough.

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #586 on: January 22, 2017, 09:22:10 PM »
Just got back from my second sojourn up north, (Asia). I have been catching up on the posts of your build and have to say I'm astonished at what you are/have achieved. I think you are certainly a master of the miniature machine tool, and obviously know these tiny Sherlines intimately, it appears you can get almost anything you need out of them. I am pretty sure you would fill a large hole in the model engineering publication offerings by doing a 'How To Build a Lombard with Micro machines' or some such. The fact that you are making something out of the ordinary and using very small equipment might be a very attractive proposition to many potential model makers who like a book on the bench to follow and who don't have the resources for Cazeneuves, Hardinges and suchlike. Regards, Paul Gough.

Thanks for the kind words, Paul! The Sherlines do have their limits in turning large diameters and taking deep cuts, but with a bit of time even moderate sized parts can be nibbled away. A friend of mine who has a company that makes some machine parts could chuck up my whole lathe and turn it sideways - his lathe is about 12 feet long.... yikes!

As it happens, though, I already have such a book (or maybe magazine serial) in process - First couple chapters are written, rest are outlined and are being filled in as I go... Stay tuned!

 :cheers:

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #587 on: January 22, 2017, 11:54:10 PM »
Got the front bolster made. I wound up making it out of brass, had a chunk closer to the right size than I did in steel, and it was easier to round over the top like the real one (which is a wood timber, they rounded it to keep water from collecting on top and rotting it).
After milling it to correct outside dimensions,

the top edges were notched to fit into the frames

and then drilled with clearance holes to match the bolt holes already in the frames.

....
and then,
....
 :wallbang: :facepalm:
realized that I had very carefully, very accurately, measured from the wrong edge for the positions of the holes! 
 :toilet_claw:
So, after turning some plugs from brass rod and soldering them into place with some Tix solder (very handy stuff, very strong, and wicks into the tightest joint wonderfully), I went back and redrilled them in the correct spots, which overlapped the first set of holes. Sigh.
Then, after a trip to the belt/disc sander to round over the top (done roughly, the originals I saw looked like they were taken down quickly with an adze or axe, and when I paint them I will rough the surface too)

they were asssembled onto the frame rails for a test fit.

To level the frame up for the picture, the shop elves sent over their robot to do the heavy lifting...

Next up will be to make up the rest of the mounting flanges/plates, and the crossbars that make up the rest of the main frame...
« Last Edit: May 31, 2018, 09:07:43 PM by crueby »

Online b.lindsey

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #588 on: January 23, 2017, 12:10:44 AM »
More nice progress Chris and that vintage video footage is wonderful!!

Bill

Offline paul gough

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #589 on: January 23, 2017, 06:08:05 AM »
Chris, Great to hear you have pre-empted my thoughts, hope you gain as much satisfaction as an author as a builder. Just a thought, if you are publishing in a US magazine, please consider the possibility of an English one also,(as well as), e.g. 'Engineering in Miniature' or 'Model Engineer' as they have a wide reach, magazines from the States seem only to be had by subscription, at least in this slice of the planet, whereas the English ones are in some newsagents or available through them, presume the same for New Zealand. 'Australian Model Engineering' is well known in the Antipodes. Best of luck with it and hope I can get hold of an analogue artefact when it comes off the press, or should I say 'ink squirter' of some sort? Regards, Paul Gough.

Offline Nick_G

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #590 on: January 23, 2017, 12:12:30 PM »
.
This is very impressive.  :ThumbsUp:  :)

Nick

Offline Don1966

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #591 on: January 23, 2017, 07:39:59 PM »
 Damn fine work Chris, just love the fab work........ :praise2:

Don

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #592 on: January 23, 2017, 08:21:48 PM »
More good work Chris. I'm impressed that you were able to bend the drawbar frames so accurately and get the correct spacing. Well done.

Jim
The technique that made it work was to do the initial bend on the second end with a slightly larger radius on the bend, measure the distance between the ends, and if too long, clamp in the vise on the middle portion right before the bend, and tap it in with a hammer. If too short, clamp it by the end and tap the middle in. The initial bend was easy to get within a 16th, so this worked out well.

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #593 on: January 23, 2017, 10:22:35 PM »
Moving along on the braces for the frame, first laid out and cut the angle braces up to the front bolster, and the cross braces just behind it:

and drilled the bolt holes into the frame for the front braces on the mill

In order to support the frame and keep it from shifting/twisting in the vise, I got out an adjustable support frame that I made when building the frame for my Shay a couple years ago. It is just a couple lengths of threaded rod, some bolts, and a couple wood bars - just the thing to keep long stock supported at any height:

Likewise drilled for the back ends of the cross braces, using the braces themselves to locate the holes, with their front ends bolted in place.

With both ends bolted in, drilled a 1/16" hole in the crossover for a rivet

which was hammered in on a small anvil

Here is the main frame so far...

Next up is the rear cross braces, which attach to the inside faces of the frame rather than the bottom, so the ends were heated, twisted, and bent over:

and are ready to have their mounting holes drilled...

To drill those holes, I will need to take the frames apart to clamp them securely, so while they are apart I will also do the other mounting plates for the boiler and cab. Here I am starting on the plates for the cab, which go from near the back end of the frame rails up to the wood beams that support the cab floor.

I am drilling them in pairs, since the longer bars are easier to secure in the vise, they will be cut apart after drilling. When they are done, I will do likewise with the boiler support flanges which hold up the firebox. Those are wider, and have a different bolt pattern, will show that next time...


« Last Edit: May 31, 2018, 09:07:55 PM by crueby »

Offline Flyboy Jim

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #594 on: January 23, 2017, 10:52:52 PM »
More good work Chris. I'm impressed that you were able to bend the drawbar frames so accurately and get the correct spacing. Well done.

Jim
The technique that made it work was to do the initial bend on the second end with a slightly larger radius on the bend, measure the distance between the ends, and if too long, clamp in the vise on the middle portion right before the bend, and tap it in with a hammer. If too short, clamp it by the end and tap the middle in. The initial bend was easy to get within a 16th, so this worked out well.

Now that's pretty darn clever..............gonna file that one away.  :atcomputer:

Jim
Sherline 4400 Lathe
Sherline 5400 Mill
"You can do small things on big machines, but you can do small things on small machines".

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #595 on: January 24, 2017, 12:01:48 AM »
More good work Chris. I'm impressed that you were able to bend the drawbar frames so accurately and get the correct spacing. Well done.

Jim
The technique that made it work was to do the initial bend on the second end with a slightly larger radius on the bend, measure the distance between the ends, and if too long, clamp in the vise on the middle portion right before the bend, and tap it in with a hammer. If too short, clamp it by the end and tap the middle in. The initial bend was easy to get within a 16th, so this worked out well.

Now that's pretty darn clever..............gonna file that one away.  :atcomputer:

Jim

No no, not the file, the hammer!   :Jester:

This is one of those little things I picked up watching the blacksmiths at the museums as a kid. Someday gotta take the blacksmithing courses at the local welding place - already took the copper bowl raising course, fun afternoon and learned some good techniques that apply to the boiler work.
 
« Last Edit: January 24, 2017, 12:07:28 AM by crueby »

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #596 on: January 24, 2017, 12:04:55 AM »
And got the boiler brackets drilled too...

took them all up to the sander and rounded the corners on one end,

and sawed them apart and sanded the rest of the corners...

The boiler brackets are the wide ones, the cab brackets are the narrow ones. Just need to make the blanks for the engine beds, and I can start drilling/tapping the flocks of holes in the sides of the frames.

I am glad I took this side trip onto the frame before tackling the drive chains, its made a nice break from the chain assembly line!
« Last Edit: May 31, 2018, 09:08:21 PM by crueby »

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #597 on: January 25, 2017, 03:32:26 PM »
Yesterday I got the frame holes drilled for all the side brackets

and partly assembled the suspension to locate the holes for the angle braces

So all the holes are drilled in the frames now, including the back angle braces,

just need to tap the rest of them and bolt on the brackets.
« Last Edit: May 31, 2018, 09:08:29 PM by crueby »

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #598 on: January 25, 2017, 08:52:28 PM »
Just got the last of the mounting holes in the frames tapped (lot of the little guys), and bolted on the flanges to mount the boiler and cab. Just a screw or two in each for now, had to order more 2-56 hex head screws. The engine base rails and the boiler forward support will be added later, but the holes for them are in place so I should be good to degrease and get a coat of paint on the frame rails, as well as fit the springs into the suspension. Here are a few pics of it as is:




« Last Edit: May 31, 2018, 09:08:34 PM by crueby »

Offline samc88

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #599 on: January 25, 2017, 09:30:57 PM »
Been following this for a while and got to say its very impressive work! I struggle with the tracks in simple plastic model kits of tanks! Looking forward to the finished article  :)