Author Topic: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine  (Read 58358 times)

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #570 on: January 20, 2017, 02:12:35 AM »
 Got a start on the sprockets for the roller chain end brackets. Started with a chunk of 3/4" 303 stainless bar, and drilled the axle hole on the lathe,
 
 and then moved the chuck and bar over to the rotary table on the mill, set the mill depth for the thickness of the sprocket, and cut the valleys of the sprocket 60 degrees apart:
 
 Then to make the sloped sides of the teeth, offset the mill .230 in, and the table by 15 degrees, and made another pass on each tooth:
 
 and then .230 back the other way from zero and 15 degrees the other wayfor another pass:
 
 That completed the tooth shapes, so moved the chuck back onto the lathe, and tapered the ends of the teeth a bit on the one side so that they will self center on the links of the chain:
 
 and then parted off the sprocket, leaving it slightly thick to allow for a cleanup pass:
 
 and tapered the other side while holding it in the 3-jaw (handy that it is 6 teeth) :
 
 Here is the finished sprocket
 
 and testing it in the chain - runs very smooth!
 
 So, that proves out the design for the sprocket, time to make 7 more of them!
 

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #571 on: January 20, 2017, 02:13:08 AM »
The rest of the roller chain sprockets are made:
 
 Next up will be the brackets and stepped bolt guides to hold them in place...

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #572 on: January 20, 2017, 02:14:35 AM »
Got the first batch of the sprocket end guide bolts made, 4 down 4 to go. Started with a length of 303 steel bar, and turned in the shape of the guide:
 
 and then parted it off and drilled/bored the hollow in the end to make it look more like the original cylindrical guides:
 
 Here is what it looks like with the sprocket in place,
 
 and the chain around that,
 
 and sitting in front of the track plate where it will be installed, once the brackets are made and the old cylinder guides cut off:
 
 This should run much smoother, and not slip off like the first attempt. More parts tomorrow...

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #573 on: January 20, 2017, 02:16:00 AM »
 Some more done on the roller chain sprocket brackets this evening. Started with some 1/4" square 303 bar, and took one side down to make two .200 x .250 bars, each long enough for 4 brackets:
 
 and then drilled the 4-40 tap holes for the sprocket bolts, and the clearance holes for the adjustment slots:
 
 followed with milling out the recess for the bolt heads so the clear the sprockets. There will not be enough room for hex heads and wrenches, so these will be socket head screws.
 
 Here is the first set of brackets, ready to be cut apart and the ends cleaned up. You can also see here that I have added some short lengths of 4-40 screw threads to the base of the shoulder bolts. When I originally drew them up, I was thinking that I would turn in the section for the threads, and thread with a die, but realized that for such short sections of thread that need to go right up to the shoulder, that I was better off drilling and tapping both the bracket and the shoulder bolt and adding some threaded rod cut from a screw. The rod is held into the shoulder bolt with some red loctite. This way I can be sure to be able to draw up the bolt completely. The axle portion that the sprocket rides on is slightly longer than the thickness of the sprocket, so they can spin freely.
 
 Next up is to cut the brackets off the longer bar, and then cut the cylinder guide off the track frames so I can fit these new sprocket assemblies...
 

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #574 on: January 20, 2017, 02:17:46 AM »
 Today I started the modifications to the track frames to take the new sprockets. Started by cutting apart the brackets from the longer bar,
 
 then milling off the old cylinder guides,
 
 and marking out for the mount holes for the new brackets
 
 and getting the chains fitted/tensioned
 
 
 Here is a test of the reassembled first track - all seems to be working, not derailing any more:
 

 So, on to modifying the second frame...
 

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #575 on: January 20, 2017, 02:18:41 AM »
 Well, after an afternoon of fussy fiddling, fettling, and filing of a fecundity of fussy fileable parts, and generally farting around, I got the second track frame reassembled and working well with the new sprockets on the roller sprockets.
 
    Now, on to making the main frame – going to take a break from chain making and work on that for a little while…
 

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #576 on: January 20, 2017, 02:28:07 AM »
All right, recovered the progress posts from my backup document, time to move forward on the build!

I have gotten the bars for the main frame cut to length, drilled, tapped, and ready for silver soldering them together. The frames are a shallow C cross section, could have milled out of a thicker bar, but getting a two foot length milled evenly would have been tricky, would have needed multiple steps on the mill since that is much longer than the available travel. Plus I need silver solder practice! The socket head screws you see in the photos are temporary for the soldering, and will be milled off flush. Fortunately the weather here is unusually mild this week, so I should be able to get outside for the torch work tomorrow.
Here I first drilled the holes in the wider bars to form the wider part of the C at the top/bottom, drilled every 2" along the length:

then drilled/tapped the first couple holes in the center bar to match,

and then used the holes in the outer bars as drill guides to do the rest of the holes:

And a couple of shots of the bars all bolted up, ready for soldering:



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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #577 on: January 20, 2017, 02:53:49 AM »
I've also been doing some more work on the the 3D model, got more of the brackets and such on the main frame - going to need to know where they are so I can drill the holes for them after the soldering work - much easier to do them all at once rather than taking everything apart multiple times later as each bracket gets made.




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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #578 on: January 21, 2017, 02:12:29 PM »
Yesterday I got the frame rails outside to get silver soldered up, went fairly well, still need to practice that skill some more but it worked:

and then got some updates done on the 3D version of the frame,

and started in on making the crossmembers. First up are the brackets that go around the outside of the frame at the back, and hold the towing drawbar mechanism. These are made from flat steel bar, bent to shape. I used a small torch to heat up the bend area and bent them with pliers.

That got the length close to right, and did some fine tuning on the end of the vise with a hammer to draw the bend around to the right length between the bends.
Next was the shorter frame that goes on the inside, the sizes on these are not as critical, as long as they come out the same, so I scribed in the positions of the bends and did the ends first:

and then the middle ones

Here are the completed rails, ready for drilling for fasteners.

The center rails will be held to the longer rail with rivets, then the whole assembly will get bolted to the ends of the main frame rails. I need to make up a clamping jig for drilling the ends - I thought about drilling the ends before bending, but did not think I could predict the bends well enough to get the positions of the holes correct, so the rails will be clamped to a block in the vise for drilling - more on that next time...

Offline Johnmcc69

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #579 on: January 21, 2017, 03:15:19 PM »
As always, FANTASTIC WORK Chris!! This is coming along very nicely.

  :ThumbsUp: :popcorn: John

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #580 on: January 21, 2017, 03:54:05 PM »
Wonderful fabrication Chris. And thanks also for reposting what was lost in the server transfer. The frames are looking great !!

Bill

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #581 on: January 22, 2017, 03:41:01 PM »
Before this mornings update on the build, a side trip: laid my hands on one of these metal die-cast models of a Bucyrus 95 ton rail-mounted excavator (like the ones used at Panama Canal).
Tons of detail in it, bunch of operating parts in the mechanism. It is 1:48 scale, not that big, but would serve as a great starting point for plans to model up a larger scale one someday, maybe....   :thinking:







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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #582 on: January 22, 2017, 03:47:25 PM »
This morning got some more done on the main frame. I made up a little hardwood block to hold the drawbar frames for drilling the holes in the end to mount them to the main rails:

and then clamped in the inner rails for drilling

and riveting

and then drilled the holes in the middle for mounting the drawbar mechanism itself

and then drilled/tapped the holes in the back ends of the main rails for the drawbar framework

and also the holes at the front end for the bolster block that runs across the front end and holds the steering mechanism

The front bolster on the real thing is a wood timber, I think for the model I am going to make it out of metal for extra rigidity for the steering gear.
Here is the frame with the drawbar frames test fitted - they will have to come off again to drill the rest of the mounting holes along the main rails for all the other crossbars and mounting flanges....


Offline Flyboy Jim

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #583 on: January 22, 2017, 04:17:37 PM »
More good work Chris. I'm impressed that you were able to bend the drawbar frames so accurately and get the correct spacing. Well done.

That model of the Bucyrus 95 ton rail-mounted excavator is a dandy! If you haven't already seen it, here's a video I found about it's use in Panama:
Wha a project that was!

Jim
Sherline 4400 Lathe
Sherline 5400 Mill

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #584 on: January 22, 2017, 07:23:55 PM »
Thats a great video Jim!

That got me doing some more looking around, found this one with footage of old Lombard Haulers in action, very neat to see them at work: