Author Topic: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine  (Read 295317 times)

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #555 on: January 07, 2017, 02:21:27 AM »
In between sessions working on the chains, I have been spending some time modelling up future parts in 3D to generate the plans from. 
 :atcomputer:

As I mentioned in an earlier post, the rear drive chain sprockets still needed spokes added:


More recently, laid out the main frame parts

and added them to the complete hauler design

The placement of the frame parts is still up in the air, I need to make some more measurements on the photos of the real engine, and compare them to the partial measurements available on the drawings from the museum, and then finalize the locations of the angled cross braces and the drawbar frames at the rear. In addition to these crossbars, there are additional large ones that are part of the differential and engine mounts, plus the boiler has a large cast mount at the front, a bar to the middle, and the firebox mounts at the back. So, the frame design is a work in progress still.

« Last Edit: May 31, 2018, 09:05:15 PM by crueby »

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #556 on: January 08, 2017, 08:10:45 PM »
Three track roller chains down, just one more to go! (and then two drive chains....)


« Last Edit: May 31, 2018, 09:05:22 PM by crueby »

Online Kim

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #557 on: January 09, 2017, 02:24:20 AM »
Man Chris, that is looking really good.  Lots of little detail in every one of those.

You know, they might make good bracelets too - you could sell them at the craft fair!  :Jester:

Kim

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #558 on: January 09, 2017, 02:30:32 AM »
Man Chris, that is looking really good.  Lots of little detail in every one of those.

You know, they might make good bracelets too - you could sell them at the craft fair!  :Jester:

Kim

Bracelets! Get Your Bracelets Here!  Only $5000 each!    :lolb:

Online Kim

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #559 on: January 09, 2017, 02:32:19 AM »
They'll be selling like hot cakes!  (or maybe like mint chocolate chip cookies!)
Kim

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #560 on: January 09, 2017, 02:33:55 AM »
Got some more done on the 3D version of the model, made up the front bracket that holds the smokebox end of the boiler to the frame.


and got it positioned on the main frame, as well as correcting the size/position of the other components on the frame (the cross rails were not in correct place, and frame was too wide).


« Last Edit: May 31, 2018, 09:05:35 PM by crueby »

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #561 on: January 09, 2017, 12:55:04 AM »
Nice looking part Chris.

Fabricated or machined form solid?


Dave

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #562 on: January 09, 2017, 01:31:23 AM »
Nice looking part Chris.

Fabricated or machined form solid?


Dave
Probably fabricated, it would take a big chunk of metal (little bigger than 2"x3"x3/8"), but not sure. Might do the sides and middle out of square bar, and join the 3 pieces. That is still a ways away, so time to let the brain chew on it!

Offline Flyboy Jim

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #563 on: January 09, 2017, 02:50:02 AM »
More good progress, Chris!

I like those 3d drawings. Sure makes it easy to understand what it is you're doing. One of these days I'm going to have to buy that book "3D Drawing for Dummies" so I can see how this is done.

Jim
Sherline 4400 Lathe
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"You can do small things on big machines, but you can do small things on small machines".

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #564 on: January 09, 2017, 08:40:01 PM »
More good progress, Chris!

I like those 3d drawings. Sure makes it easy to understand what it is you're doing. One of these days I'm going to have to buy that book "3D Drawing for Dummies" so I can see how this is done.

Jim

If you go to AutoDesk's website for Fusion 360, they have a whole series of great tutorial videos - that is how I picked it up.

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #565 on: January 09, 2017, 08:42:55 PM »
And the roller chains are DONE!

Just need to do a little trimming on the flange on the end of the track plate where the chain wraps around, probably do that with a rotary tool, and I can install them.

Now that the roller chains are done, I can move on to something completely different, like the drive chains.... wait.... oh crap...

Sigh.

At least there are only two, and the links are longer so fewer than there might have been... But, given the practice I've had they will go fairly quick.
« Last Edit: May 31, 2018, 09:05:48 PM by crueby »

Offline Flyboy Jim

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #566 on: January 10, 2017, 05:09:06 AM »
More good progress, Chris!

I like those 3d drawings. Sure makes it easy to understand what it is you're doing. One of these days I'm going to have to buy that book "3D Drawing for Dummies" so I can see how this is done.

Jim

If you go to AutoDesk's website for Fusion 360, they have a whole series of great tutorial videos - that is how I picked it up.

Went over and looked at AutoDesk's website. Like you said..........lots of good tutorials there. That'll be fun to play around with at some point. Geez.............so many fun things to explore and so little time!  :wallbang: I still fail to understand how folks can get bored in retirement. Not this crowd, that's for sure!

The roller chains came out great. Looking forward to seeing them mounted.

Jim
Sherline 4400 Lathe
Sherline 5400 Mill
"You can do small things on big machines, but you can do small things on small machines".

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #567 on: January 20, 2017, 01:58:50 AM »
FYI - now that the forum is back, but back in time slightly, I will repost the progress since then later tonight from my backup copy in Word. None of the back and forth posts, but at least I have the progress posts...

 :atcomputer:

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #568 on: January 20, 2017, 02:07:53 AM »
 I did some fitting work on the roller chains, trimming back the end flange on the vertical track frame to let the chain go by cleanly, and got one major step forward:
As you can see in the video, it operates properly, the chain going around as the tracks move.
 
 But, one minor step backwards. On the real hauler, the chains are held in place by the flanges on the cylinders at each end plus the flange on the bottom of the lower track frame as well as the groove in the inside of the track plates. But, those flanges are only 1/2" or 3/4" in full scale, and at 1/12th that they get pretty shallow. When rolling the tracks back and forth, they work fine for a short time and then have a tendancy to climb past the flange and derail themselves.
 
 I think this is a place where departing from strict scale accuracy (scaliness?! no, thats not right!) is neccessary for this model, since I want to be able to run it outdoors for long runs. What I think I am going to do is cut off the cylinder guides at the ends of the roller chains, and make a set of small sprockets on ajustable plates to hold the chains and allow for adding some tension to them. The sprockets will hold the chains from the inside, just like a bicycle chain, so they can't wander to the side and jump the grooves. It won't look that different, the only part easily visible will be the tooth or two visible in the gap between the chains - that could be covered with a small flange possibly.
 
 Time for some quick 3D modelling of the sprockets, and a little disassembly of the tracks....

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #569 on: January 20, 2017, 02:09:48 AM »
 I have modelled up the sprocket and bracket I talked about in the previous post:
 

The sprocket will spin on a shoulder bolt that also forms the outer guide on the left, which will keep it looking like the original cylinder. The bracket on the right has a recessed slot for socket head screws, allowing for some adjustment.
 
 
« Last Edit: May 31, 2018, 09:06:08 PM by crueby »