Author Topic: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine  (Read 295832 times)

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #450 on: December 20, 2016, 01:50:44 AM »
Oh - and I should mention that the angle bar is one of the few places that I have used plain tool steel rather than stainless, since I could not find any 303 in the thin/narrow sizes, like 1/16" x 1/4" and 1/16" x 3/16".

Does anyone know if there is a source for 303 stainless in sizes like that? I've rarely seen it in sizes under 1/8" thick.

Offline Flyboy Jim

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #451 on: December 20, 2016, 05:18:49 AM »
Another nice step forward Chris.  :ThumbsUp:

I see a picture of your belt sander. What I can see of it looks nice. What kind is it?

Jim
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"You can do small things on big machines, but you can do small things on small machines".

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #452 on: December 20, 2016, 03:59:50 AM »
Another nice step forward Chris.  :ThumbsUp:

I see a picture of your belt sander. What I can see of it looks nice. What kind is it?

Jim
Its a dremel belt/disc sander I picked up years ago, takes 1" belts and sticky back 5" discs. I like the Sandvik/Klingspor belts and discs. Very handy unit for quick rounding of corners. The corners on the brackets took less time than to take the picture, just a quick swipe while turning the part on the table. Much quicker than setting up the rotab would have been, and these are just decorative edges so absolute precision is not an issue. I use same sander for bevelling rudders and fins on the subs, etc.

Was just in the shop, had forgotten to put in the tensioning bolts on the bearing blocks, added those and they worked to tighten up the tracks, very cool!

Offline rwenig

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #453 on: December 20, 2016, 11:13:14 PM »
Your page on the Lombard hauler construction was just pointed out to me. I must say a challenging job and beautiful construction. If you didn't know, the Western Development Museum in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan has a full size one which they run from time to time. The model they have has a vertical engine.
    Did you find the chain links you were looking for? I'm not sure if they are made in the size your looking for but they are available as "half links" for bicycle chain and larger chain.

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #454 on: December 21, 2016, 02:20:07 AM »
Your page on the Lombard hauler construction was just pointed out to me. I must say a challenging job and beautiful construction. If you didn't know, the Western Development Museum in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan has a full size one which they run from time to time. The model they have has a vertical engine.
    Did you find the chain links you were looking for? I'm not sure if they are made in the size your looking for but they are available as "half links" for bicycle chain and larger chain.
The vertical engine version was made by a company called Phoenix that licensed the patent for the tracks from Lombard. They had a twin cylinder engine on each side, rather than the single horizontal one per side than tne Lombard, but the displacement was less per cylinder, so the net power was simaler. They also used a shaft drive vs the chain drive. Other than that, very close to same machine. Both are fascinating machines.

I was not aware of the half link chains, they would be perfect for the drive chains, right shape, but I don't see them anywhere in a nbr 25 or 35 chain  other than as individual links, which would be very expensive. Do you know of any source for full chains in those sizes?

The track roller chains are unique in that the cross pin has a roller that is larger than the hieght of the side plates, and also are shaped like the half link chains. At this point I am assuming that I will need to make them, but if you can point me to a source for smaller sizes that would be great. So far I have found them only in acetal plastic, which is not durable enough.

Thanks for the tip on the half link chains, will do some more looking...

 :cheers:

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #455 on: December 21, 2016, 12:28:08 AM »
Lots more progress Chris, I think you got that warp drive thingy going again. Either that or the shop elves are putting something in the cookies  :lolb: Seriously nice work though!!

Bill

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #456 on: December 21, 2016, 02:50:59 AM »
Lots more progress Chris, I think you got that warp drive thingy going again. Either that or the shop elves are putting something in the cookies  :lolb: Seriously nice work though!!

Bill

Actually I prefer using my vortex manipulator, less cost per year travelled than the Tardis...   :Lol:

Though usually the shop elves just turn loose the Cyber-Elf that they built me, it makes part overnight for me.



« Last Edit: May 31, 2018, 08:58:26 PM by crueby »

Offline 10KPete

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #457 on: December 21, 2016, 01:38:57 AM »
That dude looks like he would eat stainless steel cookies!! :o

Seriously good lookin' track assys Chris!! :ThumbsUp:

Pete
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Offline Brian Rupnow

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Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #459 on: December 21, 2016, 04:13:44 AM »
Is this any help?
https://concordsheetmetal.com/materials/stainless-steel/?gclid=CLO0vsmThNECFRmewAodOyADdw
What I've been looking for is 303 in the thinner sizes (like 1/16) in flat strip stock rather than sheet stock, since I don't have a good way to cut or shear off even strips. In lieu of that, have been using tool steel strips, which I have been able to find. Thanks for the pointer though!

Offline Flyboy Jim

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #460 on: December 21, 2016, 05:08:56 AM »

The track roller chains are unique in that the cross pin has a roller that is larger than the hieght of the side plates, and also are shaped like the half link chains. At this point I am assuming that I will need to make them, but if you can point me to a source for smaller sizes that would be great. So far I have found them only in acetal plastic, which is not durable enough.


Lets see..........it looks like 40 rollers per chain and 4 chains...........thats only 160 rollers to knock out! Hopefully it's of a diameter that you can buy stock for. Then there's the side plates. The bright side is that making those chains should be a small project compared to the tracks! Christmas is coming, so that might give you some leverage with the shop elves!  :Lol:

Jim
Sherline 4400 Lathe
Sherline 5400 Mill
"You can do small things on big machines, but you can do small things on small machines".

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #461 on: December 21, 2016, 05:43:33 AM »

The track roller chains are unique in that the cross pin has a roller that is larger than the hieght of the side plates, and also are shaped like the half link chains. At this point I am assuming that I will need to make them, but if you can point me to a source for smaller sizes that would be great. So far I have found them only in acetal plastic, which is not durable enough.


Lets see..........it looks like 40 rollers per chain and 4 chains...........thats only 160 rollers to knock out! Hopefully it's of a diameter that you can buy stock for. Then there's the side plates. The bright side is that making those chains should be a small project compared to the tracks! Christmas is coming, so that might give you some leverage with the shop elves!  :Lol:

Jim
Then there are the drive chains, at least only two of them....
As with the track plates, jigs and fixtures will be the key to knocking out mass quantities of the parts. I have some ideas for them, will see how it plays out. The parts themselves are simple shapes, simpler than the tracks were, at least.

Offline rwenig

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #462 on: December 21, 2016, 06:37:02 AM »
    The half links are sold as individual parts. They are sometimes called "offset links". Here is one source <https://www.thebigbearingstore.com/offset-links/>. Scroll down to the #35 and #25 size. Another link <http://www.andymark.com/Roller-Chain-25-Series-p/am-0682.htm>. Any place that sells the chain should have the half links. I think the chain and links are available in SS as well.
    Wish I could help you on the rollers but I suspect your right that you will have to make them.

Offline rwenig

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #463 on: December 21, 2016, 06:42:57 AM »
Quote
The vertical engine version was made by a company called Phoenix that licensed the patent for the tracks from Lombard. They had a twin cylinder engine on each side, rather than the single horizontal one per side than tne Lombard, but the displacement was less per cylinder, so the net power was simaler. They also used a shaft drive vs the chain drive. Other than that, very close to same machine. Both are fascinating machines.

   I stand corrected I should have remembered the Phoenix.
Rupert
« Last Edit: December 21, 2016, 10:50:02 AM by Jo »

Offline rwenig

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #464 on: December 21, 2016, 06:44:33 AM »
#25 SS half links at <http://www.rollerchain4less.com/Offeset-Link-25-Stainless-Steel-Half-Link_p_1748.html>