Author Topic: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine  (Read 295498 times)

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #390 on: December 10, 2016, 11:34:40 PM »
Don, turns out you were 100% corect, found in the Lombard parts list that there WAS a second spring inside the larger one, plus a short cone guide at the ends.
Cool design, I better model this all in 3d soon or I'll have to start over again...

Online Flyboy Jim

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #391 on: December 11, 2016, 05:04:50 AM »
Took me a bit to finally get it through my head that these last pictures were taken of the tracks from the inside.  :Doh: Now I can see how that part of the system works.

My hats off to you for being able to look at all your resources and figure this stuff out.  :atcomputer:  The machining might be the easy part of this project!  :shrug:

Jim

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Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #392 on: December 11, 2016, 03:17:10 AM »
I was thrown by the shapes of the brackets on the inside of the frames, finally figured out that half of them wrre the boiler firebox attachment brackets. An invaluable resource has been the parts catalog from the manufacturer that the museum posted. No dimensions, just side views, but names of everything and great clues to how it all worked. The original patent documents give great descriptions too, they have to specify how the mechanism works in great detail to support the claims of the patent. The final product varied some, but this part of the suspension is identical. A really fun puzzle!

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #393 on: December 11, 2016, 10:29:10 PM »
All right, got it modelled up in 3D, here is how it all works!

Here are the suspension components as seen from the outside of the frame. The rail at the top is the main frame rail of the hauler, and the axle that comes out to the center of the track is the round bar across the middle:

The fitting at the right end of the axle is a retainer clamp that goes on the outside of the center track bearing block. The gap between that and the round spacer is where the center frame of the track goes. The red parts all move up and down with the track, the gray parts are fixed to the frame.
Here is another view, from the inside of the frame looking out:

This is a simaler view to the photos I posted the other day of the real hauler.
And here is a view with the top inside red crossbar removed so you can see the inner parts:

In that view you can see that the square block around the axle has a groove in each side that rides up and down in the bracket coming off the frame. The crossbar rests on top of that block, and connects to the u shaped stirrups at either end that contain the springs. The top of the springs rest against the bottom of the main frame rails. As the axle moves up, it pushes the crossbar and stirrups, compressing the springs. Very slick and simple setup, once you can see all the parts. It took a bunch of digging through the photos and the patent documents to figure it out, but its all sussed out now, so I can make the 2D drawing views and start making parts.

Hmmm.... looking at the first picture, it looks like I made the stirrups a little too narrow, and the outside edge is still just under the frame rail - have to go back and check that, may need to widen it a bit - the stirrup opening should be as wide as the frame rail and the bracket behind it.
« Last Edit: May 31, 2018, 08:54:43 PM by crueby »

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #394 on: December 11, 2016, 10:44:43 PM »
Yup - stirrup was too narrow, here is the corrected first drawing:


« Last Edit: May 31, 2018, 08:54:51 PM by crueby »

Offline Captain Jerry

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #395 on: December 12, 2016, 02:53:56 AM »
Chris - That is great detective work.  Your drawing and description makes the mechanism clear and easy to follow.  Is there something that keeps the springs in position such as a rod through the center.  Is there some kind of seat on the frame where it contacts the spring? I don't see anything in the parts list that would serve the purpose.







NOTARY SOJAK

There are things that you can do and some things you can't do. Don't worry about it. try it anyway.

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #396 on: December 12, 2016, 01:02:00 AM »
Chris - That is great detective work.  Your drawing and description makes the mechanism clear and easy to follow.  Is there something that keeps the springs in position such as a rod through the center.  Is there some kind of seat on the frame where it contacts the spring? I don't see anything in the parts list that would serve the purpose.
Yes, there is a small cone guide at the ends of the springs to keep them centered. In the parts list it is item 140 on cut nbr 6, where it also shows the nested springs.

Offline Captain Jerry

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #397 on: December 12, 2016, 03:21:43 AM »
Got it.  It just doesn't look like a cone on the parts list.  So how does it work, one at the top bolted to the frame and one at the bottom bolted to the spring box?
NOTARY SOJAK

There are things that you can do and some things you can't do. Don't worry about it. try it anyway.

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #398 on: December 12, 2016, 01:37:18 AM »
Got it.  It just doesn't look like a cone on the parts list.  So how does it work, one at the top bolted to the frame and one at the bottom bolted to the spring box?
Exactly. Wide end bolted to the plate, small end into the end coil of the spring. Keeps the spring from sliding out of position. The brace across the bottom of the bracket that angles up to the main frame does two things, keeps the axle block from being able to drop out of the bracket, and keeps the bracket from twisting.

Online Flyboy Jim

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #399 on: December 12, 2016, 05:15:12 AM »
Good detective work there "Inspector Crueby"!  :ThumbsUp: You must have watched a lot of episodes of "Columbo".

Jim
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Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #400 on: December 12, 2016, 01:52:22 PM »
Good detective work there "Inspector Crueby"!  :ThumbsUp: You must have watched a lot of episodes of "Columbo".

Jim
Yup! And there's always "one more thing!"  But no cigars.

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #401 on: December 12, 2016, 06:24:44 PM »
A bit more copying/pasting around in the 3D world, and here is what the track and suspension system is going to look like. For now the main frame rails are just stubs till the rest gets modelled up, but it gives you a good idea of how it will all come together.



« Last Edit: May 31, 2018, 08:55:19 PM by crueby »

Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #402 on: December 13, 2016, 12:03:22 AM »
Chris---you have the most exciting build going on the whole internet right now.---Brian

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #403 on: December 12, 2016, 10:13:29 PM »
Chris---you have the most exciting build going on the whole internet right now.---Brian

Wow - thanks Brian! 

Though I doubt I can compete with the latest cute dancing kitten video, or whatever is popular these days among the non-machinist crowd... Not a bad thing, just sayin', as Cletus would say!

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #404 on: December 12, 2016, 10:19:51 PM »
Now that the suspension is mapped out, time to get back to making swarf. I took the other half of the bar I had cut down for the sprocket bearing blocks, milled it up flat and square the same way as the other one, and then drilled/milled the adjustment slots and bottom groove just like the sprocket blocks. The dimensions of these blocks are a little different, but the method was the same to get to this point:

And then sketched on the holes/bosses, and milled the steps in the tops.

After turning in the bosses and drilling the bearing holes, the steps will be rounded off on the belt sander. Next step is to saw the individual blocks apart, and get them ready for the lathe...
« Last Edit: May 31, 2018, 08:55:30 PM by crueby »