Author Topic: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine  (Read 296123 times)

Offline Don1966

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #375 on: December 09, 2016, 02:33:25 AM »
Damn Chris that is awesome Dog. Some nice work...... :praise2:

Don

Offline RJH

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #376 on: December 09, 2016, 02:33:46 AM »
It looks great!  But you may have a problem with the roller chain guide, it looks to be to long in the front.

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #377 on: December 09, 2016, 02:39:32 AM »
It looks great!  But you may have a problem with the roller chain guide, it looks to be to long in the front.
Its in the right spot,  the track is sitting up high since the chain is not there. The rollers are only about 3/16, and you are seeing the overhang from the guide, so the track will be about 1/8" lower. When holding it up it all lines up right. And yes, made me look!

 :cheers:

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #378 on: December 09, 2016, 02:42:38 AM »
Hi Chris,
 That makes all the right noises!

On the chain front, sorry didn't make it clear, was just suggesting the brought chain as a source of supply of the rollers & potentially the pins. Remove them from the brought stuff & make up your own side links. But I guess you still end up in the same boat(err in your case submarine) that the rollers have to be the right size!

Cheers Kerrin
No sweat. And I am not sure if disassembling a riveted chain would be easier than making one from scratch! Besides, this way I can say I made it all. Except for the parts I didn't, like pressure gauge, safety valve, fuel tank...

Online b.lindsey

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #379 on: December 09, 2016, 03:08:08 AM »
It all looks amazing Chris. I haven't looked in a day or two and you are making some fast progress!!  Well done!!


Bill

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #380 on: December 09, 2016, 03:59:39 AM »
It all looks amazing Chris. I haven't looked in a day or two and you are making some fast progress!!  Well done!!


Bill
Thank you Bill! Its a big relief that it all moves smoothly after all that work.

Online Kim

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #381 on: December 09, 2016, 07:39:42 AM »
Wow, Chris, that's just pretty cool!
Kim

Offline kvom

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #382 on: December 09, 2016, 02:08:28 PM »
Working well.  Your hand makes the scale evident.   :ThumbsUp:

Offline vcutajar

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #383 on: December 09, 2016, 03:32:16 PM »
 :praise2: :praise2: :praise2: :praise2:

Vince

Offline Roger B

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #384 on: December 09, 2016, 09:43:55 PM »
Magnificent  :praise2:  :praise2: It's hard to keep up with your builds  ::)
Best regards

Roger

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #385 on: December 09, 2016, 11:00:44 PM »
Thanks all!

Having a great time with this build. Can't wait to see it with the real one in the spring.

Online Flyboy Jim

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #386 on: December 10, 2016, 04:51:46 AM »
Looking great Chris!  Looks fresh out of the factory. Love the video.

Performs good for only having 1 HP as in "one hand-power" for an engine!
 
Jim







Sherline 4400 Lathe
Sherline 5400 Mill
"You can do small things on big machines, but you can do small things on small machines".

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #387 on: December 10, 2016, 11:46:53 PM »
Guys - after getting back from the train show, been looking through the photos of the Lombard up in Maine again, and finally found a couple of pictures that show the track frames from the top, in the center where the axle will be. There IS a slab of metal between the two track frames, holding them apart leaving a gap at the ends for the sprockets. I can't tell how far down they go, or how they are attached, but it is a seperate piece (can see the edges of the track frames above the spacer). It could have been welded together, or held with bolts that are behind something else.

I have been looking in that area to get enough details to model up how the center axle itself and the parts that hold it to the main frame are shaped. There is a spring box there, with angled webs going up to the frame fore and aft. Looks to be some coil springs to give it a little bit of suspension travel, maybe 3 inches worth. The main axle is just a plain rod, goes through the spring boxes and the pivot on the track frames, and is clamped inside and out of all that with a square split plate. Still getting my head around the spring arrangement...



It looks like the springs are connected to a sleeve around the axle by posts that go through slots next to the coil springs, but I have not worked out what moves which the frame and what moves with the axle...

EDIT: Possible bit of luck, I went back and looked at Lombards' original patent filings, and it looks like he drew the same suspension setup in his description. I am going to dig through the patent and see if I can figure out which parts are bolted to which. And I thought I was able to stop reading patents when I retired!! Sigh...

« Last Edit: May 31, 2018, 08:54:24 PM by crueby »

Offline Don1966

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #388 on: December 11, 2016, 12:38:44 AM »
Chris looking close at your photo it looks like a spring within a spring and wound opposite.


Don

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #389 on: December 10, 2016, 11:08:27 PM »
Chris looking close at your photo it looks like a spring within a spring and wound opposite.


Don

I've been going through the patent and the patent drawings, which detail out each part and what each is connected to, though in the usual terse legalese run-on sentances. I believe I have it figured out, and have made some sketches to keep it straight. I think the rust and shadows of the opposite side of the spring make it look like another spring inside but its not. There is a nub at the bottom to hold the spring in place.

What he did was actually pretty simple and elegant. The stirrups with the springs are held with a crossbar on either side, over the square block that the axle slips through. The bottom of the spring rests on the inside of the stirrup, and the top of the spring presses against the main frame.

The crossbars between the stirrups just rest on the axle block. The axle block rides in a slot in the big bracket that is bolted to the main frame. That bracket comes down the inside of the frame, and forms a box beam that extends under the frame - that is the slotted part next to the stirrups that I thought a bar went through, it is actually just a box beam casting. The axle block can run up and down in the big slot in that bracket, compressing the springs as it does so. That bracket has the angled bar running back up to the frame to help stabilize it.

I will model it up in 3D and post some diagrams of it in the next day or so - pretty slick setup.