Author Topic: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine  (Read 295310 times)

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #345 on: December 05, 2016, 02:50:30 AM »
More nice progress Chris and looking just like the real thing!!

Bill

Offline Captain Jerry

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #346 on: December 05, 2016, 03:09:23 AM »
Quote
The bolt heads are just out of the way of the roller chain, but I am planning to mill them thinner anyway and angle the heads so the chains won't have a tendancy to catch on them.

If they can catch, they will catch.  Why don't you use counter sunk flat head screws and eliminate the possibility? They are completely hidden from view.
NOTARY SOJAK

There are things that you can do and some things you can't do. Don't worry about it. try it anyway.

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #347 on: December 05, 2016, 03:33:48 AM »
Quote
The bolt heads are just out of the way of the roller chain, but I am planning to mill them thinner anyway and angle the heads so the chains won't have a tendancy to catch on them.

If they can catch, they will catch.  Why don't you use counter sunk flat head screws and eliminate the possibility? They are completely hidden from view.
Nice idea. Easy enough to run in a countersink. The slots could be filled with some jb weld to make them completely flush. Thanks!!
Not sure if I have some 4-40 cs screws, easy enough to mod some if not.

Offline fumopuc

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #348 on: December 05, 2016, 04:56:14 AM »
Hi Chris, a very impressive project.
Kind Regards
Achim

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #349 on: December 05, 2016, 06:46:52 PM »
More on the roller guides. I got the notches milled, so that they fit over the bottom guide plates. Since they go on either end, four had to be milled on one side,

and the other four on the other

They were clamped in place on the plates, and the hole in the base used as a guide to start the drill for the bolt holes. Here are the parts all assembled:

I also countersunk and ground off the center spacing plate bolts, sort of like Jerry suggested. I did not have any flathead screws in the right size, so I measured the heads of some caphead bolts, drilled a shallow recess that size, loctited in the bolts and milled off the heads, which will leave a clear path for the roller chains.




I think at this point I am ready to start in on the forward bearing blocks...
« Last Edit: May 31, 2018, 08:51:41 PM by crueby »

Offline wagnmkr

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #350 on: December 06, 2016, 12:51:21 AM »
I am hearing engine chuffing and track clanking and rattling sounds in my mind as I view these pics. Since the driver was in the front and the engineer in the back, many feet away, there was like more than a few choice words loosed as well.

Excellent job so far Chris.

Tom
I was cut out to be rich ... but ... I was sown up all wrong!

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #351 on: December 06, 2016, 12:58:56 AM »
I am hearing engine chuffing and track clanking and rattling sounds in my mind as I view these pics. Since the driver was in the front and the engineer in the back, many feet away, there was like more than a few choice words loosed as well.

Excellent job so far Chris.

Tom
Thanks Tom!

A couple more days, and I can at least make the clanking sounds when rolling the tracks back and forth! Maybe run the Shay in the background for the engine noise....

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #352 on: December 06, 2016, 01:20:47 AM »
Another shop session this afternoon (its cold/wet outside, great day to stay in), got started on the front sprocket bearing blocks. I started with a chunk of 303 steel big enough to get both the front bearing blocks and the central pivot blocks out of - worked out to less waste to split a wide bar in half than to trim away part of the next size down I had. The bar is thick enough to get both the main block and to turn out the boss around the axle.

Now, here is a prime example of how rolled bar has internal stresses that can come out when you cut it. In the next photo, I had cut the bar in half lengthwise, and laid out the two halves with the outer (formerly) straight edges next to each other:

As you can see, the bars have bowed a bit, leaving a gap of about a millimieter in the center. Also, after looking close and holding up a ruler along side them, it was apparent that one bowed more than the other, and more at one end than the other in the same piece. Always something to keep in mind. On these bars, not a problem since there was enough material left to mill both edges back straight again, plus the bars will be cut into short segments anyway.

After sizing the bar, and figuring out the spacing of the slots for the mounting bolts (the bearing blocks can slide a bit to tension the track), I went down the line and spot drilled pairs of holes for each slot.

and then came back with a 3/32 drill at each position. The final slots will be 1/8" wide, but the smaller drill allowed me to drill either end of each hole without the holes walking into each other.

And then came back with a 1/8" end mill, and did a plunge cut at either end of each slot, and again in the center, then cleaned up the remainder.

The end mill was not long enough to reach all the way through the bar, so I flipped it lengthwise and did a pass from the opposite side to finish them up.

Then, before cutting the bar in half to do the shaping on the top/bottom surfaces, I sketched in the outlines of each one so I would not get things backwards later. Note that there are two left and two right side blocks.

and then cut the bar in half so I can work on the rest. The bottoms get a notch to ride on the top rail of the track frame, and the after end gets a notch. Once those are done, I will take the blocks to the lathe to turn the outer faces down to form the boss around the axle.

The sketched in lines are just there to help me orient them correctly, measurements will be used to do the actual cuts.
« Last Edit: May 31, 2018, 08:52:39 PM by crueby »

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #353 on: December 06, 2016, 04:30:15 AM »
A couple more pictures that I forgot to post earlier - I had blended the corners of the frames into the chain guides:

on both sides

and took some family shots of the parts.

 I then put the track assemblies at the distance apart they will be in the final model, a little over 8", which looks huge:




« Last Edit: May 31, 2018, 08:52:48 PM by crueby »

Offline Steamer5

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #354 on: December 06, 2016, 03:55:08 AM »
Hi Chris,
 Well after 2 days of not getting my fix, :killcomputer: you have been a busy boy! The tracks are coming on nicely!
  Right off to the shop,  :popcorn: required! It's not growing fast enuff to keep up!

Cheers Kerrin
Get excited and make something!

Offline Flyboy Jim

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #355 on: December 06, 2016, 06:33:12 AM »
Looking good Chris. I'm glad I printed out the pics you posted of the track mechanism and the drawing you made. Helps me to keep track of what is going on.  :)

I'm amazed at how much your material moved when you split it. I'd of believed it for wood (based on experience), but never thought about metal moving that much!

Jim
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Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #356 on: December 06, 2016, 06:36:47 AM »
Hi Chris,
 Well after 2 days of not getting my fix, :killcomputer: you have been a busy boy! The tracks are coming on nicely!
  Right off to the shop,  :popcorn: required! It's not growing fast enuff to keep up!

Cheers Kerrin
Thanks! Things have been coming together nicely lately. I want to get the bearings on for the sprockets and the center pivot axle to tie it all together before starting on the roller chains. The chains will take a while, given the number of parts, but I have some ideas on a way to production line tjem with some more jigs and fixtures. Hope they work out.

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #357 on: December 06, 2016, 06:43:30 AM »
Looking good Chris. I'm glad I printed out the pics you posted of the track mechanism and the drawing you made. Helps me to keep track of what is going on.  :)

I'm amazed at how much your material moved when you split it. I'd of believed it for wood (based on experience), but never thought about metal moving that much!

Jim
Yeah, while cutting down the middle I could see the kerf opening up. I have seen it on brass bar lots of times, which is why I now always do a stress relief pass in the oven on brass bar that I will be cutting down the middle, or even just milling off on one side. For brass its easy, 500f for an hour in the oven (degreased first!) Does the job. For the 303 though, I have read that the temperature required is much higher than a household oven can do. Fortunately in this case there was enough material to mill it straight again. For turning on the lathe its no issue since you are taking evenly from all sides.

Offline Don1966

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #358 on: December 06, 2016, 06:03:05 PM »
Bud you just keep chewing up the metal and making art with it. Your are sure on a roll Dog and still with you...... :praise2:

Don

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #359 on: December 06, 2016, 06:33:56 PM »
Bud you just keep chewing up the metal and making art with it. Your are sure on a roll Dog and still with you...... :praise2:

Don
Nice having you along for the ride!