Author Topic: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine  (Read 295984 times)

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #315 on: December 01, 2016, 09:00:07 PM »
Chris, those last pictures really help a lot seeing how all this will work together. Really nice!!

Bill

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #316 on: December 01, 2016, 09:15:13 PM »
Chris, those last pictures really help a lot seeing how all this will work together. Really nice!!

Bill

Thanks Bill - it is getting close to where I can push the tracks around while making steam engine noises.... Wait, did I type that out loud? ...  :ROFL:

Offline Tennessee Whiskey

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #317 on: December 01, 2016, 07:40:20 PM »
As long as you wasn't wearing bib overalls and a bandanna around your neck while making those sounds  :lolb:  Work looks great.

Cletus

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #318 on: December 02, 2016, 02:34:17 AM »
As long as you wasn't wearing bib overalls and a bandanna around your neck while making those sounds  :lolb:  Work looks great.

Cletus
Nope, not wearing that... As far as you know anyway...! Um, err...  :ROFL:

Offline Captain Jerry

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #319 on: December 02, 2016, 01:27:47 AM »
Chug.......Chug......Chug.....Chug....Chug...Chug..Chug..Chug.. :DrinkPint:
NOTARY SOJAK

There are things that you can do and some things you can't do. Don't worry about it. try it anyway.

Offline Flyboy Jim

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #320 on: December 02, 2016, 05:37:42 AM »
Looking good. I'm following along with my drawing and pictures!

If you have the time, when you do the soldering could you expand on that process? It still seems a little like "Black Art" to me!  :shrug:

Jim
Sherline 4400 Lathe
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"You can do small things on big machines, but you can do small things on small machines".

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #321 on: December 02, 2016, 04:51:10 PM »
Looking good. I'm following along with my drawing and pictures!

If you have the time, when you do the soldering could you expand on that process? It still seems a little like "Black Art" to me!  :shrug:

Jim
Will do, what I can - can't take pics during the soldering itself (torch is hard to hold in my teeth) but will try and get some during the prep/cleanup. I learned iit from Kozo's book on the New Shay. Main things are a close fit of the parts (still want just a small gap for the solder to flow into), clean parts well, apply flux, I use the wire form of the silver solder so cut a small length and put at the joint, heat with torch from other side of the parts (not direct flame on the flux/solder side) till the flux melts then the solder melts into the joint (if flux all dries up and gone before the solder melts then you need a bigger torch nozzle), let it cool, soak in pickle solution (not real pickles!, mild acid) to loosen the crusted flux, then rinse and wire brush clean. If parts don't fall apart then you did good. I use a Seivert torch, which has a variety of tip sizes for different size parts (full copper boiler needs a LOT of heat, small parts use small nozzle), which hooks up to a 20 pound propane grill tank with a regulator that screws into the tank. Works very well.

Offline Flyboy Jim

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #322 on: December 02, 2016, 05:11:01 PM »
Looking good. I'm following along with my drawing and pictures!

If you have the time, when you do the soldering could you expand on that process? It still seems a little like "Black Art" to me!  :shrug:

Jim
Will do, what I can - can't take pics during the soldering itself (torch is hard to hold in my teeth) but will try and get some during the prep/cleanup. I learned iit from Kozo's book on the New Shay. Main things are a close fit of the parts (still want just a small gap for the solder to flow into), clean parts well, apply flux, I use the wire form of the silver solder so cut a small length and put at the joint, heat with torch from other side of the parts (not direct flame on the flux/solder side) till the flux melts then the solder melts into the joint (if flux all dries up and gone before the solder melts then you need a bigger torch nozzle), let it cool, soak in pickle solution (not real pickles!, mild acid) to loosen the crusted flux, then rinse and wire brush clean. If parts don't fall apart then you did good. I use a Seivert torch, which has a variety of tip sizes for different size parts (full copper boiler needs a LOT of heat, small parts use small nozzle), which hooks up to a 20 pound propane grill tank with a regulator that screws into the tank. Works very well.

Thanks Chris. You've covered a lot of bases with this post. I've had Kozo's book on my Amazon Wishlist for some time now..........guess I better get it ordered.

Jim
Sherline 4400 Lathe
Sherline 5400 Mill
"You can do small things on big machines, but you can do small things on small machines".

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #323 on: December 02, 2016, 06:49:21 PM »
Looking good. I'm following along with my drawing and pictures!

If you have the time, when you do the soldering could you expand on that process? It still seems a little like "Black Art" to me!  :shrug:

Jim
Will do, what I can - can't take pics during the soldering itself (torch is hard to hold in my teeth) but will try and get some during the prep/cleanup. I learned iit from Kozo's book on the New Shay. Main things are a close fit of the parts (still want just a small gap for the solder to flow into), clean parts well, apply flux, I use the wire form of the silver solder so cut a small length and put at the joint, heat with torch from other side of the parts (not direct flame on the flux/solder side) till the flux melts then the solder melts into the joint (if flux all dries up and gone before the solder melts then you need a bigger torch nozzle), let it cool, soak in pickle solution (not real pickles!, mild acid) to loosen the crusted flux, then rinse and wire brush clean. If parts don't fall apart then you did good. I use a Seivert torch, which has a variety of tip sizes for different size parts (full copper boiler needs a LOT of heat, small parts use small nozzle), which hooks up to a 20 pound propane grill tank with a regulator that screws into the tank. Works very well.

Thanks Chris. You've covered a lot of bases with this post. I've had Kozo's book on my Amazon Wishlist for some time now..........guess I better get it ordered.

Jim
You can get the Kozo books from the publisher, Village Press, at list price. Lots of sellers on Amazon charge more. His New Shay has the most info, covers more techniques than the first Shay book. Even if you don't build the loco, you can get a lot of information.

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #324 on: December 02, 2016, 11:24:18 PM »
OK!! Too late tonight, but tomorrow is certainly cookie day! I don't think we've ever made a mint chocolate chip cookie....


Cletus.... you're not in that eastern part of the state that's burning are you? God help those folks....

Pete
So, how did the shop gnomes like the cookies?   :LickLips:

Offline 10KPete

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #325 on: December 02, 2016, 10:00:17 PM »
OK!! Too late tonight, but tomorrow is certainly cookie day! I don't think we've ever made a mint chocolate chip cookie....


Cletus.... you're not in that eastern part of the state that's burning are you? God help those folks....

Pete
So, how did the shop gnomes like the cookies?   :LickLips:

 :embarassed: Discovered we didn't have any mint in the house. Will get some tomorrow when we go to the store. Today we baked a "Browned Butter" cake...  ^-^

Pete
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SB 10K lathe, Benchmaster mill. And stuff.

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #326 on: December 03, 2016, 12:33:36 AM »
OK!! Too late tonight, but tomorrow is certainly cookie day! I don't think we've ever made a mint chocolate chip cookie....


Cletus.... you're not in that eastern part of the state that's burning are you? God help those folks....

Pete
So, how did the shop gnomes like the cookies?   :LickLips:

 :embarassed: Discovered we didn't have any mint in the house. Will get some tomorrow when we go to the store. Today we baked a "Browned Butter" cake...  ^-^

Pete
If you can find it, get the baking emulsion mint, the regular mint extract in alcohol bakes off and leaves little flavor.

And who knows, maybe the cake will work on the gnomes too!   :stir:

Offline 10KPete

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #327 on: December 03, 2016, 02:03:14 AM »
Well, the shop gnomes, and the elves, around here sure don't lose any weight this time of year! :lolb:

Pete
Craftsman, Tinkerer, Curious Person.
Retired, finally!
SB 10K lathe, Benchmaster mill. And stuff.

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #328 on: December 03, 2016, 02:09:01 AM »
Well, the shop gnomes, and the elves, around here sure don't lose any weight this time of year! :lolb:

Pete

Not here either! Keeping busy with winter leagues and clearing snow helps, but the treats are so GOOD!  :LickLips:

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #329 on: December 03, 2016, 02:19:33 AM »
The silver soldering on the track frames is done, took several sessions to do all the sides since solder prefers to flow downhill into the joints (that darn antigrav unit is acting up again), so I did all the joints on the long top side with the rtacks angled, then soaked in the pickle solution about a half hour then wire brushed them to clean them up enough to do the base, then again to do the overhanging lip at the bottom.

In the past, most of the silver soldering work I've done has been on copper and brass, and I used Sparex solution for the pickling. That solution does not like steel though (used Sparex can make a nice copper plating solution onto the steel however), so I have tried another method I read about on the net, just vinegar with a teaspoon of salt per cup of vinegar. It did work very well on removing the hardened flux, another new item this time, I am using Tenacity 5 flux rather than the Harris white flux I've used in the past, seems to last longer under heat. The vinegar acts slower, but is much more mild to be around. I have the parts in it overnight to see how much it can clean them up with a longer soak time. From what I've read, it should work fairly well.

Hmmm... got some time to kill, might as well do some quality assurance testing on a few more cookies...  :LickLips: