Author Topic: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine  (Read 296043 times)

Offline 10KPete

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1564
  • Nordland, WA, USA
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #255 on: November 24, 2016, 06:18:17 AM »
Jaysus Cletus--Your the only guy on the forum that likes rust!!!

Oh no. Not alone in that. I would have made it all out of regular steel and let it take on a patina...

But it ain't mine!!

Pete
Craftsman, Tinkerer, Curious Person.
Retired, finally!
SB 10K lathe, Benchmaster mill. And stuff.

Offline wagnmkr

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 662
  • Lindsay, Ontario, Canada
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #256 on: November 24, 2016, 12:51:10 PM »
Actually, when the first pics of the assembled tracks were posted, I have to say I had a picture in my head of how good they would look ... or how realistic they would look ... with a fine patina of dried mud and atmospheric seasoning. After all, some of the plastic kit guys spend weeks making one of their creations look like that. Mind you, here that does the dusting might not be best pleased with a large chunk of rusty metal on the mantle. 

Just sayin mind.

Tom
I was cut out to be rich ... but ... I was sown up all wrong!

Online crueby

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9054
  • Rochester NY
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #257 on: November 25, 2016, 02:35:33 PM »
The forum finally let me in, its been messed up the last two days...

I did run the sprockets through the tumbler, came out nice too. They will be painted black in the final model, like most of the hauler. The track plates won't, and the sprocket teeth will be bare, or will wear through very quick anyway. A few trips around the driveway and yard should patina things quickly, as will the steam oil combined with the dirt.

If the site stays alive for a while I'll get some more pics up...

Online crueby

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9054
  • Rochester NY
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #258 on: November 25, 2016, 03:01:25 PM »
I got the rest of the sprocket spoke corners rounded off, and gave them a run through the tumbler with the cermic media to knock off the gloss like I did with the track plates.

For those who like real patina on a model, here is something to shoot for - this is what the real thing looks like:


Here are the sprockets before

and after tumbling. The difference can be hard to see in the pics, but in person it is a big difference

Here they are in place on the tracks - everything runs smooth when rolling them back and forth on the table by hand. As you can see I have added the axles as well - they are a little long, will be trimmed back when the bearings are done. The back axle is a lot longer, since it will get the drive chain sprocket on the inner end.


Now, the next parts will be the vertical casting plates that hole the track assembly together. There are two per track, mirror images of each other, to hold either ends of the axles and also the roller chains at the bottom. The main axle back to the frame of the hauler comes through the middle, and the tracks can pivot on that axle to match the terrain. So far I have 3d modelled the casting plates along with the sprockets and full tracks.

I printed out the plan view of the casting plates actual size of the model so I could pick bar stock and decide how to make them. Currently, I am thinking that the main part will be from 1/8" x 1" steel, with a thicker piece shaped and silver soldered on to make the top flanges, and then the lower horizontal features will be soldered on as well. The alternative would be to carve the whole thing out of one block, but that would be a whole lot more work, and probably would get some warp from the internal stresses in the metal when carving so much out of one side. In piecing it up, each part will be held with small screws till silver soldered, then the screw heads trimmed off. The holes where the axles come through will be lined with bronze bearings, like the original was done. Should be fun, this is where the tracks really come together.
« Last Edit: May 31, 2018, 08:46:54 PM by crueby »

Offline vcutajar

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 2484
  • Marsascala, MALTA
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #259 on: November 25, 2016, 04:07:17 PM »
That is a real great result Chris.  I see you are getting used to Fusion 360.

Vince

Online crueby

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9054
  • Rochester NY
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #260 on: November 25, 2016, 04:33:08 PM »
That is a real great result Chris.  I see you are getting used to Fusion 360.

Vince
Its a great software package, a few things I wish they could add, but am having great fun with it. Having done some 3d animation work in the past helps with the concepts.

Today I have started cutting down the bar stock for the central plates.

Offline Flyboy Jim

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1573
  • Independence, Oregon
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #261 on: November 25, 2016, 05:25:06 PM »
The sprockets came out nice Chris. Tumbling took the edge off, but there's still a nice contrast with the tracks.

The 3d drawing really shows how this is all going to look when completed.

That's a great picture of the real thing. I'm sure they're a lot bigger in real life, but the cotter pins sure look delicate, considering the beating they take.

Jim
Sherline 4400 Lathe
Sherline 5400 Mill
"You can do small things on big machines, but you can do small things on small machines".

Online crueby

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9054
  • Rochester NY
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #262 on: November 25, 2016, 06:31:49 PM »
The sprockets came out nice Chris. Tumbling took the edge off, but there's still a nice contrast with the tracks.

The 3d drawing really shows how this is all going to look when completed.

That's a great picture of the real thing. I'm sure they're a lot bigger in real life, but the cotter pins sure look delicate, considering the beating they take.

Jim

The wear they take is probably why they are on on the outside ends, so they can be replaced if needed if they get too worn. They are pretty big though:

My model ones are fairly teensy, it will be interesting to see how they hold up. Having the washer there helps, but there is still going to be wear on them. For the time, and the fact that he was making most of this up as he went, its amazing to see how sophistocated Lombards engines were.


« Last Edit: May 31, 2018, 08:47:16 PM by crueby »

Online crueby

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9054
  • Rochester NY
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #263 on: November 25, 2016, 06:42:08 PM »
Some good progress on the vertical track casting plates (not sure what else to call them, that is how they are named in the Lombard parts catalog) today. I started out by cutting some 1/8"x1" 303 steel bar stock to length and milling the ends square and to size:

and then marked out the locations of the upper edges, and rough-sawed them to remove the bulk of the metal

Here they are being milled down to size - a parallel bar is underneath to keep the parts level in the vise.

on to the second section

then a thin pass on the top to remove the rounded corners

before notching one end for the end bearing cap to come later

and the other end for the end cap

Here are a couple of the plates set into the approximate position that they will be in the final assembly. The axle bearing for the left end and the center pivot bearing will be held on seperate bearing blocks that bolt down onto this plate, with tensioning bolts on each.

And the family shot of the 4 plates so far.

Next up will be to make the wider trim pieces that go along the top edges and then the horizontal plates for the bottom edges.
« Last Edit: May 31, 2018, 08:47:25 PM by crueby »

Offline Captain Jerry

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1028
  • Summerfield, FL USA
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #264 on: November 25, 2016, 07:07:49 PM »
Chris, "track frames" is the common term in dozer circles.
NOTARY SOJAK

There are things that you can do and some things you can't do. Don't worry about it. try it anyway.

Online crueby

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9054
  • Rochester NY
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #265 on: November 25, 2016, 07:23:45 PM »
Chris, "track frames" is the common term in dozer circles.
Thanks! Adding to my vocabulary.

Offline RayW

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 432
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #266 on: November 25, 2016, 07:43:39 PM »
Hi Chris. Great work so far and following with interest. If you find your tracks slipping in the mud, you could always try this idea seen in Norway on a small Ransomes MG6 crawler tractor!

Regards

Ray
Ray

Online crueby

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9054
  • Rochester NY
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #267 on: November 25, 2016, 08:06:19 PM »
Hi Chris. Great work so far and following with interest. If you find your tracks slipping in the mud, you could always try this idea seen in Norway on a small Ransomes MG6 crawler tractor!

Regards

Ray
I love it! Lets see, four horseshoes per horsepower in the engine...  :ROFL:

Online b.lindsey

  • Global Moderator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13705
  • Dallas, NC, USA
    • Workbench-Miniatures
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #268 on: November 25, 2016, 08:39:21 PM »
Glad you were able to post an update Chris. Still checking in and following along as I am able to get onto the forum. It's been pretty good today so far, just the occasional glitch. I think the sprockets look just fine after tumbling too!!  Still plenty of contrast in my opinion.

Bill

Offline fumopuc

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 2397
  • Munich, Germany, EU
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #269 on: November 25, 2016, 09:36:35 PM »
Hi Chris, I am following along quietly, great show.
Kind Regards
Achim