Author Topic: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine  (Read 295264 times)

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #225 on: November 19, 2016, 11:02:59 PM »
That looks amazing Chris!!  Glad you got the post in.

Bill

Thanks Bill, it was a big relief that all that cutting on the sprocket teeth worked out - very glad I did the wooden test one first to work out the dimensions. The original design was close, just had to widen the angles a little bit to allow the next track to rotate into place cleanly. What I learned on these will hopefully make the ones for the drive chains go a little easier - at least those don't have the alternating tooth shapes.

There is a big snowstorm moving in tonight from the midwest part of the country, hopefully the power stays on so that I can work on the other three sprockets this weekend!

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #226 on: November 20, 2016, 02:28:32 AM »
Okay, another session this evening, and all four sprockets now have the tooth area narrowed and tapered down to size, and had the burrs knocked off with a file. They all mesh nicely with the tracks, so next time I will modify the arbor to have a smaller top plate and will turn the spoke areas down to size - the section under the teeth and the hub stay full width. Then it will be time to set up for cutting the spoke openings.


« Last Edit: May 31, 2018, 08:31:43 PM by crueby »

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #227 on: November 20, 2016, 02:31:44 AM »
Good luck with the snow Chris, hope you don't lose power. Losing the forum and power in the same weekend...the shop gnomes must be up to something sinister!!!

Bill

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #228 on: November 20, 2016, 02:42:25 AM »
Good luck with the snow Chris, hope you don't lose power. Losing the forum and power in the same weekend...the shop gnomes must be up to something sinister!!!

Bill

Its when you hear the snickering and clanking noises in the basement that you get worried....!

And given how the weather forecasters around here love to hype things and pick the worst-case model to broadcast, it will probably be 75 degrees and sunny. Happened before! Though there was one time years ago that the weatherman was in the middle of talking about how nice a day it was, and a hand with a note came in from off camera. "Oh, never mind, its a severe rainstorm out there!". We suggested investing in a window in the studio...  Being just east of Lake Erie and on the south edge of Lake Ontario, we do get some oddball weather shifts and lake-effect snow/rain storms here. A few hours ago I was out clearing leaves and it was upper 60s. Now it is 33 degrees.

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #229 on: November 20, 2016, 02:59:27 AM »
My theory exactly Chris...all weather people need a window in their office or should be required to go outside three times a day...the forecasts would improve 1000%  :lolb:

Bill

Online Flyboy Jim

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #230 on: November 20, 2016, 05:04:22 AM »
Looks good Chris.  :ThumbsUp: You've got this part of the build coming your way.

In order to taper the teeth, did you angle the headstock slightly? Can't tell from the picture.

Jim
Sherline 4400 Lathe
Sherline 5400 Mill
"You can do small things on big machines, but you can do small things on small machines".

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #231 on: November 20, 2016, 05:13:15 AM »
Looks good Chris.  :ThumbsUp: You've got this part of the build coming your way.

In order to taper the teeth, did you angle the headstock slightly? Can't tell from the picture.

Jim
Thanks - getting the tracks and sprockets to mesh is a major step, and something I have never done before. Closest was a small sprocket for a chain, and that took a number of experiments to get something that worked. Next big challenge on the build will be when I get to the roller chains and the drive chains. Got some ideas on mass producing those parts, will see how many of the ideas fall in the shop vac!

It was such a short shallow taper, I just freehanded the move in as I was pulling the carriage back, then I smoothed it up with a file held to the teeth as it was spinning. The headstock was still square to the bed. If it was a longer surface I would have put the compound slide on and set the angle there.
The tips of the teeth still need to be rounded at the tips, as seen from the side of the sprocket. That will be done (probably tomorrow) with a fine belt on the sander, again just freehand on the sander's table - just knocking off the corners so it is just a swipe on the belt - I tried it with a file, but could tell my fingers would go numb doing that many tips (120, I think).

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #232 on: November 20, 2016, 08:44:29 PM »
Time to get the spokes out of the sprockets. I started by turning in the middle area of each disc on one side.

Then, to make the turned side of the disc still rest flat on the widest part of the arbor, turned a recess to match the size of the hub.

Then turned the second side of the discs to match the first side.
With the chuck/arbor moved back over to the rotary table, now laying horizontal again, the first disc was bolted down to the arbor, using the second smaller bolt as a locating pin, which was then removed again. This allows me to repeatably index the sprockets onto the arbor for each operation. The smaller bolt cannot be left in place for the drilling operations, since its head overlaps the inside hole of the spoke opening.

After consulting Don's nifty little spreadsheet on spoke drilling (same one I used on my Corliss build), I calculated the offsets for the corner holes of the spokes. With that information in hand, I centered the rotary table, zeroed the handwheels, and moved out to the position of the inner holes, locked down the mill table, and spot drilled them, advancing the rotary table 60 degrees per hole:

Then went around again and drilled:

This operation was repeated for each plate before moving on. Next step was to drill the first of the outer corner holes for the spokes. The mill table was moved over to that position, again using the info from the spreadsheet, and those holes spotted

and drilled

With those done for all the plates, the mill table was moved forward to the opposite side of the spoke, and the second corner hole spotted

and drilled

like the first side was. It can be a little hard to see the pattern of where the spokes will be in that picture, so here it is with the spoke edges drawn in:

So, after drilling the final holes in the other three plates, and drawing the spokes in on them as well to reduce the chances of cutting on the wrong side (which can easily happen, I had to erase one of the lines I drew since IT was in the wrong place!), it will be time to remove the bulk of the material in each triangle. I think I will chain drill a slightly larger hole just inside each line, then come back with the end mill to connect them up and clean up the edges. Otherwise, it is a really long set of cutting for a small end mill. More on that next time...
« Last Edit: May 31, 2018, 08:32:07 PM by crueby »

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #233 on: November 21, 2016, 02:30:10 AM »
More work on the spokes this evening - finished drilling the corner holes (had to stop and see how they looked in one of the tracks first)

and then started chain drilling around the arcs at the outer end, keeping the position a bit inside the finished edge so that I did not need to spot drill, if the drill wandered a bit at the start, no problem:

and then down the sides of the spokes

At that point I switched to a 1/8" end mill, and with the position set to stay a bit inside the finished sizes, started by milling the arc at the outer edge

and then same thing down first one side (the table needs to be moved forward to do the other side of the spokes, so I did all of the plates on one side first)

and then moved the table back to do the other side, freeing up the remaining chunk in the center

Here are the plates with one roughed out, three more to go - enough for one day. Note that there is still a lug around the locator bolt hole - I want to leave that until the outer arcs are milled, since that puts some side force on the part and I dont want to risk it moving, plus it is a simple matter to get the parts back in the same place with it still available.

Once all the spokes are roughed, I can trim them to final width, and then will use a corner rounding mill to round over the edges of the spokes and the inner edge of the rim...
« Last Edit: May 31, 2018, 08:32:14 PM by crueby »

Offline Steamer5

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #234 on: November 21, 2016, 06:50:35 AM »
Hi Chris,
 Looking good, think I'll start growing  :popcorn:, at the rate of your updates going to buy it takes to long & it takes too long to catch up! :lolb:

Cheers Kerrin
Get excited and make something!

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #235 on: November 21, 2016, 06:58:54 AM »
Hi Chris,
 Looking good, think I'll start growing  :popcorn:, at the rate of your updates going to buy it takes to long & it takes too long to catch up! :lolb:

Cheers Kerrin

This forum made me buy it in 5 pound bags!

 :cheers:

Offline Steamer5

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #236 on: November 21, 2016, 07:16:10 AM »
Hi Chris,
 At the rate projects updates on here, why are you cutting back, I mean 5 pound bags, that would only last a couple of days!  :stir:

Cheers & keep up the good work,
Kerrin

PS wonder if the bit of 8" copper tube I've got would make a boiler for one of these?
PPS NO must keep on track.....well VERY slowly moving forward
Get excited and make something!

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #237 on: November 21, 2016, 02:21:23 PM »
Chris, I was going to comment last night but about the time I typed it up the access went down again. Those sprockets look wonderful. You are making it all look too easy though  ;)

Bill

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #238 on: November 21, 2016, 04:30:07 PM »
Chris, I was going to comment last night but about the time I typed it up the access went down again. Those sprockets look wonderful. You are making it all look too easy though  ;)

Bill
I would not have seen the reply last night anyway, that storm moved in, deep lake effect snow off Lake Ontario with high winds, and power went out for a couple hours. Nice thing about retirement is not having to venture out on first snowfall roads, lots of accidents this morning. Traffic to living room chair was light!

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #239 on: November 21, 2016, 09:15:11 PM »
Next step on the spokes is to take the openings out to final dimensions. I started with the outer rim, turning the rotary table for each opening:

Then ran down one side of each spoke

and then the other

and also cleaning out the section where I had the locator bolt - these last operations are light cuts, and I am using the marks on the brass arbor to locate the sprockets.

Last steps are to round over the corners, first on one side of one leg of each spoke,

then moving over and doing the other side and the outer rim in one pass

It is hard to see all the radiuses in the photo with the reflections, will post some more pics later once both sides are all done and out of the mill...




« Last Edit: May 31, 2018, 08:46:03 PM by crueby »