Author Topic: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine  (Read 296065 times)

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #210 on: November 17, 2016, 01:14:55 AM »
Those parts just keep on coming.....Geeez Dog you putting us to shame but some damn fine work..... :ThumbsUp:

 :popcorn:
Don
Thanks Don!  Pass the biscuits!  Voof!

Offline ddmckee54

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #211 on: November 17, 2016, 09:58:57 PM »
crueby:

The tracks can be a real bear.  When I built my wooden excavator models I always started with the tracks. 
about 30 man-hours and 500 parts later I'd have a set of tracks.  Then the rest of the build seemed like it was all downhill.

For what it's worth, a few weeks ago I started researching the Phoenix Centiped steam truck/locomotive.  I THINK that they built a prototype but I'm not real sure.  The only reference that I have been able to find to the Centiped is an article in the January 7, 1922 "American Lumberman" magazine.  I know that the Phoenix used a different track arrangement than the Lombard log hauler uses, but this shows a track that sets it apart from any other Phoenix log hauler.

Your tracks are looking good, keep up the good work and remember that it's all downhill from here.

Don

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #212 on: November 18, 2016, 12:09:17 AM »
crueby:

The tracks can be a real bear.  When I built my wooden excavator models I always started with the tracks. 
about 30 man-hours and 500 parts later I'd have a set of tracks.  Then the rest of the build seemed like it was all downhill.

For what it's worth, a few weeks ago I started researching the Phoenix Centiped steam truck/locomotive.  I THINK that they built a prototype but I'm not real sure.  The only reference that I have been able to find to the Centiped is an article in the January 7, 1922 "American Lumberman" magazine.  I know that the Phoenix used a different track arrangement than the Lombard log hauler uses, but this shows a track that sets it apart from any other Phoenix log hauler.

Your tracks are looking good, keep up the good work and remember that it's all downhill from here.

Don

The Phoenix Hauler version used a very different drive, it was a shaft drive back to the track with a miter gear to get back into the right plane for the track. I found a CAD drawing someone did of the Phoenix, quite a lot of detail differences, though the general idea of the tracks is the same.

I figured like you did, that if I can get the tracks to work that the rest of the machine is do-able for me. I've done boilers, engines, gears, and frames, it is the tracks plus the drive chains that are totally new to me. Hopefully it is not the same kind of downhill ride that the steersman had in these things, on and icy road with a hundred tons of logs pushing you faster and faster down the hill, screaming!   :hellno:

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #213 on: November 18, 2016, 12:39:43 AM »
Time for the real fun on the sprockets, cutting the teeth. With the first sprocket blank on the rotary table on the mill (I actually did the drilling operations at each horizontal position on each of the blanks before repositioning for the next operation), I centered/zeroed the handwheels, and moved the table left to the distance for the first set of holes, which will take the center bushings in the tracks, and center drilled 24 degrees apart:

then drilled the holes with a 5/32" drill:

Then moved the table inwards to the distance for the other set of holes, which will take the lugs at the center of each track plate, moved the starting angle by 12-1/2 degrees to put it in the center of the other holes, and center drilled those positions:

and switched to a 1/8" drill to make these holes:

Now it was time to mill the flats for the teeth. As I was setting up, I found that the table was JUST hitting the column at the bottom of the slots, so I reset to the back of the table for the milling operations. Whoops.
Once I worked out the offsets for the flats, I started by milling them for one side of the lug openings,

then angled over 12-1/2 degrees to do the same for the same side of the bushing openings,

and then relocated over to the other side to repeat the process for the other side of each tooth:

Here is the first blank with the teeth cut, next to the wooden test part and the next blank to go:

Comparing it to the wooden one, everything looks good, but I cannot actually test it on the tracks yet till I can get them back on the lathe to narrow the teeth down to final width, and also take the diameter down a few thou to final size - I had to leave it a little large so that the holes would not come out the edge. Since I dont want to disturb the rotab setup, I will do the teeth on the other 3 blanks first then move the chuck and arbor back to the lathe....
« Last Edit: May 31, 2018, 08:30:58 PM by crueby »

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #214 on: November 18, 2016, 01:20:04 AM »
Those are looking great Chris. Obviously a lot of work goes into each one, but your seem to have the routine down now.  Well done.

Bill

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #215 on: November 18, 2016, 01:30:18 AM »
Those are looking great Chris. Obviously a lot of work goes into each one, but your seem to have the routine down now.  Well done.

Bill

Thanks Bill - there are a lot of steps in milling out the teeth edges, I think I will stick to doing one blank at a time to keep the mind fresh and stave off the mental goofs. I wrote down the settings/sequences while doing the first one so I can get the rest the same.

I do have to wait for the shop elves to be asleep or busy elsewhere, or the singing is too distracting! 
 :cheers:

Offline Flyboy Jim

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #216 on: November 18, 2016, 03:36:25 AM »
I had to go back and look at the last couple of pages, but I think I got how this is going to work now. Looks good!

Jim
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"You can do small things on big machines, but you can do small things on small machines".

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #217 on: November 18, 2016, 03:57:04 AM »
Thanks Jim!

I forgot to mention, before going to the lathe to thin the teeth, the rotary table will be tipped up vertical to square up the bottoms of the lug valleys so they will lay flat with the bottom of the track plates.

The one step that will be done by hand is filing the tips of the teeth round. They are narrow so that will be easy.

Once the teeth are narrowed and test fit to the tracks, I can start on shaping the spokes and hub section.

Offline joe d

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #218 on: November 18, 2016, 01:06:14 PM »
They are looking good, Chris :ThumbsUp:

I really liked your proof of concept wooden sprocket... way easier than junking another piece of stock. 
Filed for future reference.

Cheers, Joe

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #219 on: November 18, 2016, 01:15:29 PM »
They are looking good, Chris :ThumbsUp:

I really liked your proof of concept wooden sprocket... way easier than junking another piece of stock. 
Filed for future reference.

Cheers, Joe
Was way faster, easier  and cheaper! Now that I know the setup, I can assembly line all 4 parts without worrying if it will fit.

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #220 on: November 19, 2016, 10:28:50 PM »
I have the first sprocket turned down on the rim to get the tracks to fit over the teeth, nice fit. If the forum sever will just stay alive for a while I will upload pictures.

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #221 on: November 19, 2016, 10:35:03 PM »
Well it is up for me at the moment Chris :)  Looking forward to seeing the sprocket!

Bill

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #222 on: November 19, 2016, 10:49:02 PM »
I did the last operation on the mill for the sprocket teeth (will be back on it later to cut the spokes out), which was to square up the bottom of the valleys where the center of the track plate sits.

and then went over to the lathe to narrow the teeth portion of the rim to the width of the slots in the track plates, and also tapered the teeth slightly to make it an easier slip fit, allowing for a little misalignment.

After filing off the burs on some of the edges, and a trip back to the mill to open up the squared valleys just a little more, the tracks fit over the sprocket just fine.  BIG relief!

I was able to rotate the track by hand from the other end, and it rolled the sprocket around just fine. I still want to go back and file the tips of the teeth round, but they are functional. I will turn the edges of the other three to match this one, then I can start in on the spokes.


« Last Edit: May 31, 2018, 08:31:27 PM by crueby »

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #223 on: November 19, 2016, 10:51:36 PM »
Was JUST able to get that post in - had two 403 errors, retried it, and it went through. Glad I copy the post contents before trying to post (I keep a backup copy in Word for major builds).

That server is still pretty wonky, needs some more grease in the Gronicle joints!  Maybe the Fetzner valve is clogged again...

 :killcomputer:

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #224 on: November 19, 2016, 10:56:14 PM »
That looks amazing Chris!!  Glad you got the post in.

Bill