Author Topic: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine  (Read 296098 times)

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #195 on: November 13, 2016, 10:36:03 PM »
By Golly Ollie, give that man a cookie! That looks like it will work well Chris.

Tom
Cookie - yeah!   :cheers: (we need a cookie icon!)

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #196 on: November 13, 2016, 11:27:33 PM »
I took measurements from the wooden test sprocket, and it looks like the only change I will make to the CAD model is to open up the angles of the lug valleys a bit. The opening for the pivot bushing is fine, and all the radius placements are fine. Not bad, considering that I have not learned to do the animations of multiple parts in the software yet so it was sketched by eye on the tooth sides. Glad I did the test wheel first, saved a bit of rework on the steel version.

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #197 on: November 14, 2016, 12:22:20 AM »
Great idea to do the test wheel in wood Chris, looks like you are very close to the final design though...very nice!!

Bill

Online Flyboy Jim

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #198 on: November 14, 2016, 03:36:56 AM »
Coming along nicely Chris. I already know more about crawler tracks than I ever did before. Like others, I was always in the "tracks full of mud camp".

What CAD software are you using?

Jim
Sherline 4400 Lathe
Sherline 5400 Mill
"You can do small things on big machines, but you can do small things on small machines".

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #199 on: November 14, 2016, 12:23:39 PM »
Coming along nicely Chris. I already know more about crawler tracks than I ever did before. Like others, I was always in the "tracks full of mud camp".

What CAD software are you using?

Jim
I'm still learning about tracks, lot more to them than I ever knew!

I am using AutoCAD Fusion 360, which can be had for free for individual non commercial use. I am going through the video tutorial series on thier website, so far can do the basic modelling steps. It can generate 2d dimensioned plan sheets from the 3d too. It stores info online so you can share parts with a team. Nice package, I will probably use 5% of its capabilities.

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #200 on: November 14, 2016, 12:28:16 PM »
Great idea to do the test wheel in wood Chris, looks like you are very close to the final design though...very nice!!

Bill
It worked out well, still need to do some research on the photos to figure out how long to make the axles front and rear. The rear ones get a drive chain sprocket on the inside ends. The axles don't go all the way across, there is a central axle that the track assemblies pivot on. I wasn't sure about the pivoting till I saw a video of the real one going over a bump.

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #201 on: November 14, 2016, 11:01:55 PM »
Well, its a good thing that I have a bunch to do on the cotter pins for the tracks, the sprocket plates just took a big step backwards.

I had picked up an offcut of .120 thick 304 stainless plate from a metal supplier that I thought would be perfect for the sprockets and for some of the larger plates in the track assembly. This evening I cut out square blanks for the sprockets, and went to drill the center holes. Man, does this stuff dull and destroy drill bits fast! Don't know what the hardening of it is, or it is mismarked as to alloy, but this stuff is odd. Pushes out a bit from the bit, then gloms onto it, even with plenty of oil. Destroyed a brand new 1/4" cobalt steel bit. Given the number of holes that I will be drilling to form the sprocket teeth, I am backing away from this stuff and going to look for another route - see what flat stock or round stock I can find to machine the sprockets out of.  I haven't seen a bit destroyed like this since the time I hit a hard inclusion in a casting.

 :toilet_claw:

EDIT:
Well, Dumb Luck strikes again! (BTW - Dumb Luck was the name of my first boat! Mainly since 'take it easy but take it' would not fit on the transom).

I went back and dug into my steel stock piles, looking for something that I could piece up possibly for the sprockets (finished size just under 3" diameter), or maybe a wide but thicker piece of something to recut down, and at the back of the stack came up with a 3' length of 3/16" thick x 3" wide 303 stainless that had followed me home during the Shay build. Nearly perfect for this, a little thick but the blanks will be turned down for the teeth shapes anyway, and this leaves the hub a little thicker without adding on pieces. And I know this stock is proper alloy and annealing state.
 :whoohoo:
Sometimes it pays to be a minor-scale packrat!
 
« Last Edit: November 14, 2016, 11:11:17 PM by crueby »

Offline Tennessee Whiskey

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #202 on: November 14, 2016, 11:23:19 PM »
Chris,  I think 304 is the "dumping ground " for stainless alloy.  If you think it drilled terrible,  try turning a piece  :hellno:. We used a lot of 304 in the paper mills for piping and you could easily see the difference between it and 316 just by the weld puddle when TIG welding.

Cletus

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #203 on: November 14, 2016, 11:48:13 PM »
Chris,  I think 304 is the "dumping ground " for stainless alloy.  If you think it drilled terrible,  try turning a piece  :hellno:. We used a lot of 304 in the paper mills for piping and you could easily see the difference between it and 316 just by the weld puddle when TIG welding.

Cletus
I have used a lot of 303, not sure about 316. There are so many alloys these days, which are good for machinability with home tools? By that I mean no flood cooling, exotic tools.

When you mention the weld puddle, what was the difference? Did the 304 have contamination?

Thanks!

Offline Roger B

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #204 on: November 15, 2016, 05:35:20 PM »
There is a lot of dubious material out there  ::) We came across quite a lot of rusty stainless steel on my last project in China  :( For the critical parts we sent samples to a European lab for analysis.

Still following along  :wine1:
Best regards

Roger

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #205 on: November 15, 2016, 10:03:02 PM »
Today I got spools of a variety of sizes of stainless steel wire, and got a start on the cotter pins (the shop elves were hiding, so I had to do it). The first track is done, ready to start the second.

I had started cutting down the steel flat bar for the sprocket blanks, when I got a call from a friend of mine with an invite to go out canoeing on one of the local creeks - turned out to be a decent day for this time of year, calm wind, sunny, almost 60 degrees (F) - took one look out the window, put down the saw, and out the door I went! Was a great day to get out, some years it is snowing by now...
« Last Edit: May 31, 2018, 08:30:08 PM by crueby »

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #206 on: November 16, 2016, 09:11:45 PM »
Today the cutting starts on the sprocket wheels that turn the tracks, four of them in all. to start, I prepped the stock for the sprockets. I sawed squares out of a larger bar, and clamped them to the mill table for drilling the center hole.

The plate was held on top of a 1-2-3 block, with the drilling done over one of the holes in the block so it would not be hit. Each was drilled and reamed to 1/4" -.001".

In order to hold them securely for milling and turning I made up an arbor out of some 1-1/4" brass round bar. With the ends squared up, drilled the center for a 10-32 thread, and redrilled the outer 1/4" for the clearance on the bolt. Then recessed the end a bit so that it will only bear on the outer edge:

This will form the cap of the arbor, so I parted it off leaving the cap 1/4" thick:

and then turned back the face, leaving a stub that is a snug fit for the holes in the sprocket plates:

Then I moved the chuck over to the mill, leaving the arbor chucked up so that everything stays concentric, and drilled/tapped for a 5-40 bolt out near the rim. Given the size of the sprockets (about 3" diameter), I don't want to take any chances with the parts spinning on the arbor during milling operations, so I will use this second bolt as a locating pin. It is far enough out that it will fall in one of the openings between the spokes.
First, here is a look at the arbor so far:

and here after drilling for the locating bolt:

Then I put each plate in place in the arbor, and through drilled a close fit clearance hole for the locating bolt:

Then, last steps were to round up the plates. They were a little too large to swing over the bed on the lathe when still square, so I used the big recip saw to knock off the corners, then put the chuck back on the lathe to get ready to round the plates:

Here is the first plate turned round. It was left larger than the final sprocket, so that I can drill holes around the edge for the teeth like I did with the wooden test part a couple days ago, see the earlier post for what that will look like.

After I get the other three plates rounded, I will move the chuck and arbor back to the rotary table on the mill and start in on the teeth...

« Last Edit: May 31, 2018, 08:30:28 PM by crueby »

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #207 on: November 17, 2016, 12:06:35 AM »
Nice progress Chris, so how is the stainless cutting on the lathe?

Bill

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #208 on: November 17, 2016, 12:22:22 AM »
Nice progress Chris, so how is the stainless cutting on the lathe?

Bill
Hi Bill,

The 304 alloy sheet stock has been abandoned, gave it to a friend with a microbrewery to use as a heat shield in the brewing area. I am doing the discs now from the bar of 303 that I found at the bottom of the pile, got lucky since I have not seen any 3/16 x 3" flat 303 anywhere lately for sale. The 303 cuts, drills, and turns just fine, its my go to alloy for stainless the last two years. The Corliss was done with the 303 for all the steel parts, same on the Shay. A little oil, clear chips, and its fine. The 304, or whatever it really was, was awful to work.

I just finished turning down the last sprocket blank to starting size, and have the first round of holes drilled in the rim, will put up pics tomorrow with details.

Offline Don1966

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #209 on: November 17, 2016, 12:58:34 AM »
Those parts just keep on coming.....Geeez Dog you putting us to shame but some damn fine work..... :ThumbsUp:

 :popcorn:
Don