Author Topic: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine  (Read 296127 times)

Offline wagnmkr

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #180 on: November 11, 2016, 11:39:25 PM »
That didn't take long at all! I haven't made a single part all week and you have done a few dozen ... and fiddly wee potlickers as well! Think I'll go back to knitting.

Tom
I was cut out to be rich ... but ... I was sown up all wrong!

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #181 on: November 12, 2016, 12:00:39 AM »
That didn't take long at all! I haven't made a single part all week and you have done a few dozen ... and fiddly wee potlickers as well! Think I'll go back to knitting.

Tom
Oh, come on, its only 10 dozen so far... And I'd rather do these than knit!

Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #182 on: November 12, 2016, 12:20:52 AM »
My mother tried to teach me to knit when I was a kid. Long dark winter nights and only one television channel (on a good clear night). I never did learn. Tried to learn to play cribbage and never did well at that either. Dumb damn kid!!---but---I bet her and I played ten thousand games of crokinole each winter.

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #183 on: November 12, 2016, 12:55:51 AM »
My mother tried to teach me to knit when I was a kid. Long dark winter nights and only one television channel (on a good clear night). I never did learn. Tried to learn to play cribbage and never did well at that either. Dumb damn kid!!---but---I bet her and I played ten thousand games of crokinole each winter.

I played tons of Euchre and gin rummy during school and at lunch time at work, loved that, but never could figure out Bridge. Made as much sense to me as a marketing plan.

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #184 on: November 12, 2016, 01:03:48 AM »
The shop elves got the rest of the rest of the washers rivetted on the other half of the pivot pins, and the other track test assembled again. They sent thier pet CyberElf over with it.


Another couple of half-hour sessions making up another big pile of washers and also the center bushings later (they go quick - drill hole in the end of the rod, part off a few, move the rod out and repeat)...

and ready to start drilling the ends of the pivots for the cotter pins.

Then I am going to give the elves a bag of cookies and let them make and install all the cotter pins...!

« Last Edit: May 31, 2018, 08:22:42 PM by crueby »

Online Dave Otto

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #185 on: November 12, 2016, 01:08:01 AM »
Hi Chris

The tracks sure look good after a trip through the bowl. Are you running them with some soap; and for how long?


Dave
They ran about an hour per batch. Looked at them after 10 minutes and a half hour, after an hour they looked good so I stopped it. The parts and ceramic bits were rotating up and down the bowl nicely.

No soap - what would that do? Like liquid dish soap? I just ran it dry, rinsed the parts off when done to remove the fine particles. When running the brass cases there is polish and brightening solutions that you can add.

Hi Chris

The soap helps flush away the swarf; and in my thinking also keeps the media from loading up; kind of  like using a sharpening stone with out any lube. I have a gallon of concentrate that I purchased from Burr-King; I think the advantage of the commercial product are the low foaming properties and rust inhibitors.

When we were kids my sister and I used to play Canasta with my grandmother and great aunt (her twin sister); lots of fun.

Dave

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #186 on: November 12, 2016, 01:23:50 AM »
Hi Chris

The tracks sure look good after a trip through the bowl. Are you running them with some soap; and for how long?


Dave
They ran about an hour per batch. Looked at them after 10 minutes and a half hour, after an hour they looked good so I stopped it. The parts and ceramic bits were rotating up and down the bowl nicely.

No soap - what would that do? Like liquid dish soap? I just ran it dry, rinsed the parts off when done to remove the fine particles. When running the brass cases there is polish and brightening solutions that you can add.

Hi Chris

The soap helps flush away the swarf; and in my thinking also keeps the media from loading up; kind of  like using a sharpening stone with out any lube. I have a gallon of concentrate that I purchased from Burr-King; I think the advantage of the commercial product are the low foaming properties and rust inhibitors.

When we were kids my sister and I used to play Canasta with my grandmother and great aunt (her twin sister); lots of fun.

Dave
Thanks for the info - will look into that for next time I run a batch.

Offline wagnmkr

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #187 on: November 12, 2016, 11:28:28 AM »
The shop elves got the rest of the rest of the washers rivetted on the other half of the pivot pins, and the other track test assembled again. They sent thier pet CyberElf over with it.



That's what I need ... a CyberElf or two! I'll print a couple up.

Really good looking tracks.

Tom

I was cut out to be rich ... but ... I was sown up all wrong!

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #188 on: November 13, 2016, 05:50:10 PM »
I got the tracks assembled, with the center bushings and the outer washers all on, ready for the cotter pins:

I was about to start on the cotter pins, but found I was out of the fine stainless steel wire needed. I thought I had another spool, have lots in copper and brass, but am out of the stainless. So, I need to go get more of that. I bet the shop elves heard I was going to make them do this job and they hid it.

So, in the meantime, I have been playing in the CAD software, figuring out the shape for the sprocket wheels for the tracks. It still needs some refinement, but I have it far enough along to make a test wheel out of wood and see if it will function as is or if I need to change anything. Here is a screen grab of it:

« Last Edit: May 31, 2018, 08:23:02 PM by crueby »

Offline AOG

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #189 on: November 13, 2016, 06:08:21 PM »
Looking at your post something popped into my head. With the track lops closed isn't it going to be difficult to install them? It seems to me that it's going to be hard to get them around all the bits and bobs in the suspension. Might I suggest leaving the last link open so you can put the model on the tracks and lay the remainder over the top of the suspension and then close the last link.

Just a suggestion

Tony

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #190 on: November 13, 2016, 06:19:50 PM »
Looking at your post something popped into my head. With the track lops closed isn't it going to be difficult to install them? It seems to me that it's going to be hard to get them around all the bits and bobs in the suspension. Might I suggest leaving the last link open so you can put the model on the tracks and lay the remainder over the top of the suspension and then close the last link.

Just a suggestion

Tony

Hi Tony,

I don't think it will be much of a problem - the bearing blocks that the sprocket axles are held by have slots in them for tensioning the tracks, it may be possible to just loosen both of them and slip the track over the second sprocket. If not, two other options - 1) open one link like you say, just needs removing/replacing a cotter, which is easy and at worst wastes one cotter pin, or 2) taking the bolts out of one set of bearing blocks to let it move even farther. I have not drawn up the track mounting system yet, but actually was just looking through the pictures from the restoration to see about that very issue! I was also making notes on the number of spokes in the sprockets (6), and tapers, bevels, hub flange, etc.
As you can see in this picture, there are a LOT of parts to come on the track assembly:

It must have taken a lot of muscle and tools to install the track on these beasts.
« Last Edit: May 31, 2018, 08:25:45 PM by crueby »

Offline 10KPete

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #191 on: November 13, 2016, 08:30:19 PM »
Traditionally, crawler tracks are installed by driving the machine onto the track, slacking off the tensioner, pulling the ends together at the top, installing the "master" pin and then tensioning the track.

At least that's what Cat tells 'ya and what we always did....

Pete
Craftsman, Tinkerer, Curious Person.
Retired, finally!
SB 10K lathe, Benchmaster mill. And stuff.

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #192 on: November 13, 2016, 09:56:35 PM »
Traditionally, crawler tracks are installed by driving the machine onto the track, slacking off the tensioner, pulling the ends together at the top, installing the "master" pin and then tensioning the track.

At least that's what Cat tells 'ya and what we always did....

Pete

I went and watched the video of the team at the museum installing the drive chain, which is LOTS lighter than the tracks, but still very heavy, and fighting with the tensioner and pin to get it linked like you describe, still a very difficult thing to manage on something that large. Fortunately my version wieghs only about a pound or so!

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #193 on: November 13, 2016, 10:22:40 PM »
I spent some more time this afternoon refining the sprocket wheel 3d model, adding the spokes and the recesses, and it is looking more like the real one now.

Then I went up to the wood shop and found a scrap bit of 3mm marine plywood that will work fine to test out the sprocket design with the tracks - much quicker/cheaper to waste some wood than to do it for real in steel. I started by glueing a dowel in the center of a 3" circle of the plywood, and set it up on the rotary table to drill the holes for the pivot pin bushings to ride in:

and then between those, at a different offset from center, are holes to locate the middle of the valley for the track lug (center of the track plate) to ride in:

The track lug valleys will be square bottom to mate with the track plate, the bottom of the hole is tangent to where the flat will be.
Then I worked out a sequence and offsets to mill the slanted sides of the teeth (taking notes to re-use with the steel version later):

After some filing of the edges to get the width of the teeth down to the proper size (the plywood was a little thicker than the steel will be) and also squaring up the bottom of the lug valleys with a file, it was time to do some test fits

It took a couple tries to get it to be a smooth fit all the way around - had to relieve the sides of the flats a little - it became a nice rolling fit.
Initiate happy dance mode!  :pinkelephant:

I will take some measurements of the wood test wheel, and compare to the plan to see if there are any tweaks needed in the design, but it went quite smoothly. The last time I made a sprocket was for the weight chain on a clock, and that one took half a dozen attempts over several days, this one proved that CAD drawing it first can work. Maybe not always, but at least it can!


« Last Edit: May 31, 2018, 08:26:00 PM by crueby »

Offline wagnmkr

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #194 on: November 13, 2016, 10:31:54 PM »
By Golly Ollie, give that man a cookie! That looks like it will work well Chris.

Tom
I was cut out to be rich ... but ... I was sown up all wrong!