Author Topic: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine  (Read 296042 times)

Online crueby

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9054
  • Rochester NY
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #135 on: November 07, 2016, 02:33:38 PM »
Dang Chris..............with these tracks, you've gone from a wood carver to a metal carver!  :lolb:

The bigger hand wheels came out great! I just added some 2 1/2" 6061 to my next Speedy Metals order. There really is a difference in the feel of 2 1/2" hand wheels vs 2". I like the custom handle as well. Of course the downside is............. now all the plastic handles are going to look like the devil, so you've got to make all new handles!  :LittleDevil:

Jim
The larger handles are a lot easier on the fingers, with so much time on the mill lately those small wheels and sharp edged handles were giving me blisters. The core of the handles is a steel bar, turned to leave a retaining lip at the end, and threaded to screw into the wheel with a drop of loctite to keep it in place.

Online crueby

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9054
  • Rochester NY
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #136 on: November 07, 2016, 02:36:19 PM »
Hi Chris, very nice. Jigs and fixtures seems to be a must for this job. The result is fantastic.
I can't imagine making these parts without the jig, possible but so much time would be needed to position correctly and the repeatability would be very hard to accomplish. With the jig, its easy.

Online crueby

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9054
  • Rochester NY
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #137 on: November 07, 2016, 02:43:15 PM »
Chris

Here is a pretty complete discussion of modern crawler tractor tracks.  It is from Dresser Industries but applies to the tracks used on almost all earthmoving equipment.  This track type has a chain link structure with track shoes that bolt to the chain  and is the type used where traction and travel are a major factor.  It is a descendent of the Lombard track  but it is one of two branches in crawler track design.

http://www.tractorparts.com/PDFs/undrcarguide.pdf

The other branch, which is used primarily on large cranes, more closely resembles the Lombard style in that the track shoes are pined together with no separate link.  This type of track is primarily used to provide a stable, low ground pressure base for a rotating platform.  Traction and wear are not a factors because the work site is carefully leveled and dressed and the machine is actually moved slowly, carefully, and rarely.

Here are a couple of pictures of modern crawler crane tracks and you can see how much more closely they resemble the Lombard track.  Notice the prominent drive lug on the inner face of the shoe.  It provides the drive face as well as the track allignment.
That's a great write-up. Neat to see how similar the crane track is too. Its amazing how complex the modern track systems have become. Normally I just see a muddy blob going around at the construction sites! Thanks!

Online crueby

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9054
  • Rochester NY
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #138 on: November 07, 2016, 04:38:38 PM »
Chris

Here is a pretty complete discussion of modern crawler tractor tracks.  It is from Dresser Industries but applies to the tracks used on almost all earthmoving equipment.  This track type has a chain link structure with track shoes that bolt to the chain  and is the type used where traction and travel are a major factor.  It is a descendent of the Lombard track  but it is one of two branches in crawler track design.

http://www.tractorparts.com/PDFs/undrcarguide.pdf

The other branch, which is used primarily on large cranes, more closely resembles the Lombard style in that the track shoes are pined together with no separate link.  This type of track is primarily used to provide a stable, low ground pressure base for a rotating platform.  Traction and wear are not a factors because the work site is carefully leveled and dressed and the machine is actually moved slowly, carefully, and rarely.

Here are a couple of pictures of modern crawler crane tracks and you can see how much more closely they resemble the Lombard track.  Notice the prominent drive lug on the inner face of the shoe.  It provides the drive face as well as the track allignment.

Jerry - the first attachment is a .htm type, but I can't seem to get it to open - can you retry it?

Offline Captain Jerry

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1028
  • Summerfield, FL USA
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #139 on: November 07, 2016, 05:44:26 PM »
Chris, I don't know what happened to the file but it won't open for me either, not even directly on my system.  Here is another attempt at a similar picture.  Chinese version.

http://www.crawlercranesparts.com/images/qie_r1_c1.jpg

NOTARY SOJAK

There are things that you can do and some things you can't do. Don't worry about it. try it anyway.

Online crueby

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9054
  • Rochester NY
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #140 on: November 07, 2016, 07:18:15 PM »
Thanks Jerry!

The profiling of the plates for the first track are done, about to start in on the ones for the other half...




And last night was another run of our RC submarine group at the local Y pool, here is a quick clip of my Alfa running (other guys were still prepping thiers, not in the water yet).
« Last Edit: May 31, 2018, 08:17:57 PM by crueby »

Offline Perry

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 194
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #141 on: November 07, 2016, 07:30:15 PM »
Those tracks looks fantastic !

Online crueby

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9054
  • Rochester NY
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #142 on: November 07, 2016, 08:38:51 PM »
Those tracks looks fantastic !

Thanks Perry! The parts of this build that are the most challenging for me are the tracks, drive chains, and roller chains - 1 down, 2 to go! 
 :cheers:

Online crueby

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9054
  • Rochester NY
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #143 on: November 07, 2016, 11:48:33 PM »
Another hour in the shop, and the plates for the other track set are fully shaped!


Next up will be the rollers that go on the pivot pins, in the center of the track in the long slot. Very simple to make, drill a hole in some round bar, and part off to length. Aside from needed a whole handful of them...! That will probably be done in a couple days, lots of other stuff on tap for tomorrow...
« Last Edit: May 31, 2018, 08:17:42 PM by crueby »

Offline Captain Jerry

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1028
  • Summerfield, FL USA
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #144 on: November 08, 2016, 12:39:08 AM »
Tracks look great.  You are really moving along.  Those rollers are called "bushings" in trackspeak.
NOTARY SOJAK

There are things that you can do and some things you can't do. Don't worry about it. try it anyway.

Online b.lindsey

  • Global Moderator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13705
  • Dallas, NC, USA
    • Workbench-Miniatures
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #145 on: November 08, 2016, 12:42:17 AM »
Those tracks are just amazing Chris!! Nice job on the larger handwheels too for the Sherline.

Bill

Offline Don1966

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5999
  • Morgan City, LA (Along the Gulf Coast)
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #146 on: November 08, 2016, 12:48:20 AM »
Woooo! Damn Dog you been busy. I.........like......... :Love:


  :popcornsmall:
Don

Offline Dave Otto

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3619
  • Boise, Idaho USA
    • Photo Bucket
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #147 on: November 08, 2016, 01:16:28 AM »
The tracks are looking very nice Chris!

I was going to comment on the tumbler or vibratory bowl (not sure which you have)? There is a wide variety of ceramic media usually in the form of cones or stars; these are used with a surfactant to vibrate around and deburr your parts. If you are using a vibratory bowl the media and parts need to roll; if there is no rolling action the parts will just wear against each other and you will not be happy with the results. I have had mixed results with my small Burr King vibratory bowl using the ceramic media. It is tricky getting the right amount of liquid to achieve the rolling action.

If you have a tumbler I can't offer much insight to how well it will work. I have a friend who used to make Llama pack frames and he band sawed the parts out of 1/2" aluminum plate then threw them into a home made tumbler that used a 55 gallon plastic drum with sand and gravel for the media. The parts were just fine for the intended purpose. you may need to experiment a little to obtain the finish you are after.

Dave

Online crueby

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9054
  • Rochester NY
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #148 on: November 08, 2016, 01:50:31 AM »
Tracks look great.  You are really moving along.  Those rollers are called "bushings" in trackspeak.

Gotcha - still looking for a copy of the 'TrackSpeak for Dummies' book! I'm learning... slowly...

Online crueby

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9054
  • Rochester NY
Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #149 on: November 08, 2016, 01:52:54 AM »
The tracks are looking very nice Chris!

I was going to comment on the tumbler or vibratory bowl (not sure which you have)? There is a wide variety of ceramic media usually in the form of cones or stars; these are used with a surfactant to vibrate around and deburr your parts. If you are using a vibratory bowl the media and parts need to roll; if there is no rolling action the parts will just wear against each other and you will not be happy with the results. I have had mixed results with my small Burr King vibratory bowl using the ceramic media. It is tricky getting the right amount of liquid to achieve the rolling action.

If you have a tumbler I can't offer much insight to how well it will work. I have a friend who used to make Llama pack frames and he band sawed the parts out of 1/2" aluminum plate then threw them into a home made tumbler that used a 55 gallon plastic drum with sand and gravel for the media. The parts were just fine for the intended purpose. you may need to experiment a little to obtain the finish you are after.

Dave
Mine is the vibratory type, use it mainly for polishing rifle/pistol brass, usually with walnut media or the like. Worth some experiments with these parts, may not get anywhere but fun to try it.