Author Topic: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine  (Read 295220 times)

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #120 on: November 06, 2016, 01:07:25 AM »
That is one heck of a cotter pin!!

Bill

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #121 on: November 06, 2016, 01:13:32 AM »
That is one heck of a cotter pin!!

Bill
Or a very very small finger...!  Always wanted to get one of those giant penny paperweights to put in the photos.

Offline vcutajar

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #122 on: November 06, 2016, 12:24:33 PM »
WOW. Lovely job on the tracks Chris.

Vince

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #123 on: November 06, 2016, 01:43:58 PM »
WOW. Lovely job on the tracks Chris.

Vince

Thanks Vince!

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #124 on: November 06, 2016, 02:04:56 PM »
With the pivot holes done, its time to move on to the shaping of the inner and outer faces of the tracks. The inside face has a recessed groove down either side for the roller chain to run along (thanks to Captain Jerry for pointing that detail out, I had missed it when laying out the part originally). On the outside, there is a ridge down the center that gives the track more track-tion. I will start with the inside groove, since once the outside ridge is cut the plates wont lay flat in the jig. There is also a lug at the center of the plate on the inside that engages with the sprocket wheel between the pivot bars - I am not sure if I am going to include that detail, I need to spend some more time with the pictures of the real tracks to figure that detail out.

So, on to the milling. With the holding jig back down flat, and the plate held lengthwise, I put in a 5/16" end mill (worked out perfectly for the groove size), and set it for a 0.025" deep cut. One pass back/forth, and the groove is done, same on other end of the plate and on to the next part... Repeat for the next hour...

Here is what the first couple look like, the ones behind them are not grooved yet.

And the first track's worth grooved - time for a break, will come back and do the other half of the plates later. They go quick, about a minute per plate.


For you guys with the Sherline lathe/mills, one side upgrade I have been wanting to do on the mill was to change out the original handwheels (2" diameter with zero resettable dials) with the larger 2-1/2" version, which I already had on the long axis on the lathe. It does not seem like a big difference, but it makes a big difference when do a lot of cranking - easier to turn, better fine control. But, I had been choking on the price - $42 apiece for a simple chunk of aluminum. While stocking up on the metal needed for this build, I had found a 3' offcut of 2-1/2" aluminum round bar at a very cheap price, so I cut off some discs and made up the two handwheels. The dimensions for the narrow end where they dial is were copied from the originals, a simple handle on a pivot was added, and for about $2 in materials the new handwheels were done - work very well. Here are a couple pics of the old and new handwheel. If you are using the smaller ones, I highly recommend making up the larger set.




« Last Edit: May 31, 2018, 08:19:26 PM by crueby »

Offline RonGinger

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #125 on: November 06, 2016, 03:15:27 PM »
How about a power feed for the Sherline? My idea is to drill and tap the center of the handwheel for an allen cap screw with a 1/4" hex hole. Locktite that into the handwheel, then use a battery powered screwdriver with a hex driver. Just pickup the screwdriver, place it into the allen screw and drive the wheel either way.

I bought a very neat screwdriver to keep on my bench with a countersink in it to debur holes. I found one (Dewalt I think, its yellow and black) that has a gyroscope in it- you place it in the screw and just slightly twist your wrist in the direction you want it to turn- there is no for/rev button to press, just twist your wrist. It works in any direction, pointed straight up, or down or however you need to hold it. It has proven to be very useful.

A power feed is not just easier, it gives a more constant speed and nicer surface finish.

How are you going to finish all those track pieces? I think a short ride  in a tumbler would give them a perfect texture and knock off all the sharp corners. They would look a lot like the original castings.

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #126 on: November 06, 2016, 04:20:51 PM »
How about a power feed for the Sherline? My idea is to drill and tap the center of the handwheel for an allen cap screw with a 1/4" hex hole. Locktite that into the handwheel, then use a battery powered screwdriver with a hex driver. Just pickup the screwdriver, place it into the allen screw and drive the wheel either way.

I bought a very neat screwdriver to keep on my bench with a countersink in it to debur holes. I found one (Dewalt I think, its yellow and black) that has a gyroscope in it- you place it in the screw and just slightly twist your wrist in the direction you want it to turn- there is no for/rev button to press, just twist your wrist. It works in any direction, pointed straight up, or down or however you need to hold it. It has proven to be very useful.

A power feed is not just easier, it gives a more constant speed and nicer surface finish.

How are you going to finish all those track pieces? I think a short ride  in a tumbler would give them a perfect texture and knock off all the sharp corners. They would look a lot like the original castings.

I was wondering about tumbling them to give them that cast look. I have a vibrating tumbler for cleaning pistol/rifle brass, but I don't think the normal walnut shell media would do more than polish them. What works for smoothing parts like these, some sort of ball bearing media? I draw the line at hand sanding each one, and the shop elves just laughed and rolled off the bench!

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #127 on: November 06, 2016, 07:35:37 PM »
Coming down the home stretch on the track plates now - got the rest of the inside grooves milled in, and have gotten the setup for the traction ridge on the outside face done. With the holding jig at a slight angle, a ball-end mill is used to cut the shape of the ridge that runs down the center, first from ones side then the other.

Here are the first few cut:

Now, just a whole lot more of them to do....

« Last Edit: May 31, 2018, 08:19:07 PM by crueby »

Offline Don1966

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #128 on: November 06, 2016, 07:46:02 PM »
Looking damn good Chris and the tracks are looking on track bud...... :ThumbsUp:

Don

Offline Captain Jerry

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #129 on: November 07, 2016, 02:08:21 AM »
Chris

Those tracks look great.  I held my breath while you were drilling those pin holes and due to that, they came out straight and true.  The roller grooves also look good. Your angled approach to the traction bar was an eye opener.  It let you raise a bar where you had no material.  Good outside the box thinking.  By the way, in current terminology, that thing is called a grouser bar or just grouser.   It is pronounced as if the "S" were a "Z".  I don't know when that became common terminology.

I think that you will be fine leaving the drive lug off of the inside face.  Modern crawler tracks are driven by contact with the bushing only with no secondary drive lug.  It will also make calculating the sprocket pitch easier
NOTARY SOJAK

There are things that you can do and some things you can't do. Don't worry about it. try it anyway.

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #130 on: November 07, 2016, 02:52:36 AM »
Chris

Those tracks look great.  I held my breath while you were drilling those pin holes and due to that, they came out straight and true.  The roller grooves also look good. Your angled approach to the traction bar was an eye opener.  It let you raise a bar where you had no material.  Good outside the box thinking.  By the way, in current terminology, that thing is called a grouser bar or just grouser.   It is pronounced as if the "S" were a "Z".  I don't know when that became common terminology.

I think that you will be fine leaving the drive lug off of the inside face.  Modern crawler tracks are driven by contact with the bushing only with no secondary drive lug.  It will also make calculating the sprocket pitch easier
Thanks for the breath holding! It actually went easy, since the gaps let the chips clear so no pecking needed, just needed oil to keep it from overheating. The first couple were a small angle off true, small tweak to the way the jig sat in the vise got it straight. I would drill through a finger section, advance to the next, and start slow to let it effectively center drill a start, then crank through.

If I had thought far enough ahead I would have bought thicker stock, but angling the cut for the grouser gave the right look. I have most of one track milled, just the other half of the plates to do. I am very happy with how well the jig has worked out.

Can you make me a list of proper terms for the track bits? I know all the correct terms for parts on my sailboat, but these terms are new to me! Probably a wiki page somewhere with a diagram...

After the pins are done I will lay out the sprocket, and make a test one (or two, three, ... ) out of wood before making the steel one. I got a deal on a 2' x 3' drop chunk of .120" thick 304 stainless plate that wil be great for the sprockets and the center plate.

Thanks for your help!!

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #131 on: November 07, 2016, 02:54:10 AM »
Looking damn good Chris and the tracks are looking on track bud...... :ThumbsUp:

Don

Thanks Don!

 :cheers:

Offline Flyboy Jim

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #132 on: November 07, 2016, 03:23:29 AM »
Dang Chris..............with these tracks, you've gone from a wood carver to a metal carver!  :lolb:

The bigger hand wheels came out great! I just added some 2 1/2" 6061 to my next Speedy Metals order. There really is a difference in the feel of 2 1/2" hand wheels vs 2". I like the custom handle as well. Of course the downside is............. now all the plastic handles are going to look like the devil, so you've got to make all new handles!  :LittleDevil:

Jim
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"You can do small things on big machines, but you can do small things on small machines".

Offline fumopuc

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #133 on: November 07, 2016, 04:38:22 AM »
Hi Chris, very nice. Jigs and fixtures seems to be a must for this job. The result is fantastic.
Kind Regards
Achim

Offline Captain Jerry

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #134 on: November 07, 2016, 01:35:32 PM »
Chris

Here is a pretty complete discussion of modern crawler tractor tracks.  It is from Dresser Industries but applies to the tracks used on almost all earthmoving equipment.  This track type has a chain link structure with track shoes that bolt to the chain  and is the type used where traction and travel are a major factor.  It is a descendent of the Lombard track  but it is one of two branches in crawler track design.

http://www.tractorparts.com/PDFs/undrcarguide.pdf

The other branch, which is used primarily on large cranes, more closely resembles the Lombard style in that the track shoes are pined together with no separate link.  This type of track is primarily used to provide a stable, low ground pressure base for a rotating platform.  Traction and wear are not a factors because the work site is carefully leveled and dressed and the machine is actually moved slowly, carefully, and rarely.

Here are a couple of pictures of modern crawler crane tracks and you can see how much more closely they resemble the Lombard track.  Notice the prominent drive lug on the inner face of the shoe.  It provides the drive face as well as the track allignment.

NOTARY SOJAK

There are things that you can do and some things you can't do. Don't worry about it. try it anyway.