Author Topic: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine  (Read 297193 times)

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #780 on: February 16, 2017, 09:14:17 PM »
Still following and enjoying  :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: the picture of the of full size one underway is excellent  :) :)

If you want to see more photos and videos, check out their museum website here, lots of great stuff!
General Info:
http://www.maineforestandloggingmuseum.org/lombard-log-hauler-resources
Videos:
http://www.maineforestandloggingmuseum.org/lombard-steam-log-hauler-38-runs

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #781 on: February 16, 2017, 10:34:30 PM »
Pretty fascinating stuff. Thanks for that.  :ThumbsUp:
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Offline 10KPete

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #782 on: February 16, 2017, 11:22:04 PM »
That whole thing is soooo cool!!! I did not know about the Lombard until you started this project, Chris, and I've been just fastinated by it.  It's like the ole boy just woke up in the middle of the night and decided that if it was too expensive to lay tracks for a rail road that he would just make the loco lay its own tracks!!  :facepalm:

What diameter is the boiler shell for that contraption?

Pete
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Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #783 on: February 17, 2017, 12:55:14 AM »
That whole thing is soooo cool!!! I did not know about the Lombard until you started this project, Chris, and I've been just fastinated by it.  It's like the ole boy just woke up in the middle of the night and decided that if it was too expensive to lay tracks for a rail road that he would just make the loco lay its own tracks!!  :facepalm:

What diameter is the boiler shell for that contraption?

Pete
Till Ron & company posted some pics and videos last fall I had never heard of them either. The Lombard seems to have filled a niche for areas too small to bother with laying track and too far for horses to be efficient. Neat stuff! I've found some old articles and books that reference the Lombard, its amazing how quickly he went from idea to prototype to production of a huge machine.


The boiler for the model is 3.25 OD, then there is a saddle tank for water over the top. I want to get the boiler tube blank page n soon to get a real feel for the looks, then I'll go back for differential and engine.

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #784 on: February 17, 2017, 03:46:22 PM »
With the skids made, it was time to knock out a set of wheels for non-snow/ice running. The wheels are fairly small diameter so that they fit under the steering gear and frame - they were used on the original just for off season transport, and used the same narrow axle as the skids. Some of the modern pictures you see show the haulers with larger rubber truck tires on wider axles, but I am going for the older style. It may be that I will make a wider/taller set for running, depending on how it behaves on these.

To start, turned/drilled the wheel blank on the lathe:

and then over to the rotary table to cut the spokes in. The spokes are approximately .150" wide, and I am using a 5/32" end mill (would have used a 1/8", but it was not long enough to reach through). The rotary table was centered on the cutter, then moved in .150 and left till it just cleared the hub. Drilled the holes for the inner arcs and out at the rim. For the second set of rim holes, the table was moved back .300. Same method as used on the sprockets, and used the method from Don's handy spoke spreadsheet.

then milled the first side of the spokes

then the other

and cleaned up the outer arc

One down, one to go...

Another hour or so for the second wheel, and ready to test on the axle:





Time for some painting, then on to the boiler front bracket...
« Last Edit: June 04, 2018, 01:30:37 AM by crueby »

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #785 on: February 17, 2017, 04:31:05 PM »
The skids and wheels both look fantastic Chris. I am loving these family pictures a lot!!

Bill

Offline Don1966

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #786 on: February 17, 2017, 04:45:22 PM »
Damn nice work and I am loving it Chris! Awesome looking Dog.


Don

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #787 on: February 17, 2017, 05:34:32 PM »
Thanks guys!

I was starting to lay out the boiler front bracket (supports the front of the boiler down to the frame), but realized that I used up the last of my 1/2" bar stock on the steering gear.

Elf Pucky!

So, gotta find some more of that, in the meantime I'll lay out the outer box for the firebox...

Offline 90LX_Notch

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #788 on: February 17, 2017, 07:04:48 PM »
It just continues to get better and better Chris.

-Bob
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My Engine Videos on YouTube-
http://www.youtube.com/user/Notch90usa/videos

Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #789 on: February 17, 2017, 07:39:20 PM »
Thanks Bob!

Got the initial drawings made for the firebox and boiler tube shell


« Last Edit: June 04, 2018, 01:30:57 AM by crueby »

Online Flyboy Jim

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #790 on: February 18, 2017, 12:27:16 AM »
Looking good, Chris. The wheels and skids came out great!

With the wheels on it, it looks like a dragster.  :lolb: Not only did Lombard invent the "Hauler" he invented the first ever dragster...........a really s...l...o...w dragster!  ;D

Jim 

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Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #791 on: February 18, 2017, 01:11:46 AM »
Looking good, Chris. The wheels and skids came out great!

With the wheels on it, it looks like a dragster.  :lolb: Not only did Lombard invent the "Hauler" he invented the first ever dragster...........a really s...l...o...w dragster!  ;D

Jim
Plenty of torque, but the power to weight ratio is not that great!

Instead of a gasser, its more of a 'coaler'

 :cheers:

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #792 on: February 18, 2017, 02:05:08 PM »
The wheels look really sharp.

I enjoy seeing your drawings. Pretty cool stuff!
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Online crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #793 on: February 20, 2017, 07:15:27 PM »
All right! Back in the shop again finally after a few days knocked flat by a bad cold, fortunately it didn't hang on too long and I can move and think again, almost lifelike...   :insane:

Since I am waiting for a new supply of some 1/2" thick steel bar stock for the front boiler bracket assembly, I figured I'd get started on the firebox shell. This model will be steam powered with its own boiler, but I am going to use a single flue butane burner setup rather than coal firing it, with a single horizontal outer tube for the boiler. MUCH simpler than the original one. That means that the lower firebox shell is just that, a shell, with no function other than holding up the back of the boiler tube. It may also hide a larger steam whistle - the scale size one would make dogs run.

So, I got out some 0.050" thick brass sheet, and cut out the sides and ends, leaving a 1/4" extra on the length of the sides and the top of the ends to use for bending in some assembly tabs. I also cut some blocks of hardwood down for bending forms - they are .200 shorter than the finished sides need to be to allow for the thickness of the tabs and the overlap of the ends.

Then, heated the area at the ends of the sides up to a dull red to anneal them, cooled in water, and clamped them between the wood blocks with 1/4" sticking out, then bent them over with a nylon hammer to avoid edge dings.

Here are the two side plates all formed up, pretty simple shapes.

Then I cut a semicircle in the sides of the blocks to form the end plates with. This arc is the size of the OD of the boiler tube (3.125"), plus 0.050 for the thickness of the plate, so the final curve should match the tube.
The end plates were also annealed along the edge to be bent over, cooled, then clamped in the vise between the blocks:

A little hammering later (the annealed brass bends like butter), and the shape was done. If I was to make another set, I would leave the plates wider, and trim them after this step - you can see how the tops pulled in from the forms somewhat.

After a slight tweak with some pliers they fit the tube pretty well,

and a little trimming on the side plate flanges made them fit the end plates,

With the forming done, time to drill holes for the rivets. Lots of holes for the rivets. LOTS and LOTS of holes...
Using the wood forming blocks as a backer, the plates were clamped down in the mill to drill the holes along the edges to join them, as well as the rows of holes across the flat areas to simulate the stay bolt pattern in the real boiler. There is no stress on this firebox like in the real one, so this will just be for show. If this was a true firebox under pressure, it would have been made out of thicker copper with bronze staybolts.

Matching holes were drilled along the tabs on the side plates

as well as across the sides to mimic the staybolt and seam patterns

Both end plates are drilled, and one sideplate is too, still need to drill the other side plate, but it is time for a nap - have not got full stength back after the cold, but its very nice to be up and about again with the brain functioning, rather than in 'duh, what?' mode!   :insane:

« Last Edit: June 04, 2018, 01:31:11 AM by crueby »

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #794 on: February 20, 2017, 07:45:31 PM »
Nice work Chris.

I've read different things about cooling heated brass. Some let air cool, others quench in water.
Does it make a difference?
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
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