Author Topic: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine  (Read 278908 times)

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #60 on: October 28, 2016, 12:21:00 PM »
Hmmmm ... Your tracks are almost exactly the same size as the 64 pieces I have printed for a radio controlled excavator that must be nearly the same scale. I might have to "borrow" your drawings for the tracks as they are way more sturdy and realistic than the printed ones.

Tom

Did you make the rest of the excavator? I've thought about building one of those for a long time, but could not come up with a good way to control the arms/bucket without actual hydraulics.

This is the one I am doing.   http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:50110    It is all printed and I am in the process of making the fastenings and fitting everything together. The "real" R/C ones from Europe do have mini hydraulic systems in them and are all metal, so very heavy. The tracks on this one are very simplistic and since I am not so good with drawing programs, it would be easier for me to machine a set.

Tom
Thats a neat machine! The tracks are different in that the hinge point is on the inside with a wider lug, where on the lombard the pins are out at the surface. Changing that would mean changing the sprocket and follower wheels I would think. Its clever how that one has the servos right in the upper arms where the hydraulic pistons would be.

Offline wagnmkr

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #61 on: October 28, 2016, 01:30:08 PM »
You are right. After another look, I better stay with what is there.

That will be a neat way to weed the garden ... while sitting on the porch with cookies ... or stinking hoppies ... or something.

Tom
I was cut out to be rich ... but ... I was sown up all wrong!

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #62 on: October 28, 2016, 02:45:18 PM »
You are right. After another look, I better stay with what is there.

That will be a neat way to weed the garden ... while sitting on the porch with cookies ... or stinking hoppies ... or something.

Tom

Are the printed parts strong enough to actually dig?

Offline wagnmkr

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #63 on: October 28, 2016, 06:25:44 PM »
You are right. After another look, I better stay with what is there.

That will be a neat way to weed the garden ... while sitting on the porch with cookies ... or stinking hoppies ... or something.

Tom

Are the printed parts strong enough to actually dig?

In soft dirt or sand ... yes. With a metal bucket, probably even in a bit harder stuff. Follow this link ... http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:50110/#files ...
Should be the list of the files for this machine. Second file from the bottom of the list ... work.mp4 ... it is a video of the machine digging.

Tom
I was cut out to be rich ... but ... I was sown up all wrong!

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #64 on: October 28, 2016, 07:53:22 PM »
I got on a roll today, and finished up the first side of all the tracks:


So, on to the second side - shifted the starting position of the table over one slot width, worked out the new pattern (which has the ends a notch and a triple-slot in the middle to leave room for the sprocket to engage), and cut a test piece:

And test fit one of the other plates against it - fits fine!

As mentioned before, note that the ends of the slots are now rounded, that will be squared off in a later pass with the jig swung up vertically. Once they are squared off, the plates will move in closer to each other. For now, another couple hours worth of slot cutting (each plate takes probably a minute per side, not bad but the quantity of them makes it take a while given rests to let the fingers/hands rest up).
« Last Edit: May 31, 2018, 08:13:00 PM by crueby »

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #65 on: October 29, 2016, 01:35:55 AM »
That is a LOT of cutting Chris. The fit looks spot on though. This is one of those jobs where CNC would be nice but you are almost as fast in manual mode :)

Bill

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #66 on: October 29, 2016, 02:25:24 AM »
That is a LOT of cutting Chris. The fit looks spot on though. This is one of those jobs where CNC would be nice but you are almost as fast in manual mode :)

Bill

Thanks Bill! Even with CNC you would have to stay there and change parts, clear chips, etc. Doing these manually really isn't taking that long, and the results are so worth it. The spacing is making it straightforward, 1/8 mill for 1/8" slot, fingers are 1/8" too, so start at zero, turn in/out 4-1/2 turns, move down 5 turns, repeat. For opposite side, reset zero at 2-1/2 turns over once, and same process again. Its only a couple hours of shop time for the whole set.
Things will get interesting when I get to the drive and roller chains. To reproduce them accurately to the original will take a lot of time, but those are the details I love in a true scale model. Like the details in this ship model...

Offline Flyboy Jim

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #67 on: October 29, 2016, 03:00:17 AM »
That is a LOT of cutting Chris. The fit looks spot on though. This is one of those jobs where CNC would be nice but you are almost as fast in manual mode :)

Bill

Thanks Bill! Even with CNC you would have to stay there and change parts, clear chips, etc. Doing these manually really isn't taking that long, and the results are so worth it. The spacing is making it straightforward, 1/8 mill for 1/8" slot, fingers are 1/8" too, so start at zero, turn in/out 4-1/2 turns, move down 5 turns, repeat. For opposite side, reset zero at 2-1/2 turns over once, and same process again. Its only a couple hours of shop time for the whole set.
Things will get interesting when I get to the drive and roller chains. To reproduce them accurately to the original will take a lot of time, but those are the details I love in a true scale model. Like the details in this ship model...

I suppose you knocked out that ship on coffee break!  :Lol:

Now that you posted the picture of that beautiful model.........we need more details about it......lots of details!  :)

Jim
Sherline 4400 Lathe
Sherline 5400 Mill
"You can do small things on big machines, but you can do small things on small machines".

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #68 on: October 29, 2016, 03:24:35 AM »
That is a LOT of cutting Chris. The fit looks spot on though. This is one of those jobs where CNC would be nice but you are almost as fast in manual mode :)

Bill

Thanks Bill! Even with CNC you would have to stay there and change parts, clear chips, etc. Doing these manually really isn't taking that long, and the results are so worth it. The spacing is making it straightforward, 1/8 mill for 1/8" slot, fingers are 1/8" too, so start at zero, turn in/out 4-1/2 turns, move down 5 turns, repeat. For opposite side, reset zero at 2-1/2 turns over once, and same process again. Its only a couple hours of shop time for the whole set.
Things will get interesting when I get to the drive and roller chains. To reproduce them accurately to the original will take a lot of time, but those are the details I love in a true scale model. Like the details in this ship model...

I suppose you knocked out that ship on coffee break!  :Lol:

Now that you posted the picture of that beautiful model.........we need more details about it......lots of details!  :)

Jim

Okay, you want details, here are details!

Actually that one was built over a period of almost 10 years, it kept getting interupted with other projects, from carvings to full size sailboats. It is a French 74-gun ship, Napoleonic era. I was up in Maine on vacation and in a used book store came across a 4-volume set of books published about the 74 gun ship by the French national maritime museum. The books were large format, about 9"x12", couple inches thick each, and comprised a full set of plans for the ship, down to every timber. Almost every page is a fold-out sheet, very detailed - just amazing stuff. Small detail was that it was written in French, which I did not read or speak, but there was not a lot of text anyway, mainly part names which were not hard to translate. The model was built to the same scale as most of the drawings, it came out approximately 46" long, all scratch built (yes, 74 canon barrels, carriages, etc to make!). Partway through the project I found a set of the same books in English, and sold the French ones. Due to the size of the ship, I only built up to the top of the lower masts, otherwise it would have been so large that building a case for it would have been a bit impractical. It was set on a base like a launching way in a shipyard, and finished simaler to how an Admiralty model would have been done, with most of the hull planking omitted to show the construction details of the hull. The model was finished in 2007 - biggest one I have done to date (other than the 1:1 boats!). Needless to say I have been building ship models for a LOT more years than I have been building engines - started as a kid.

Here are a few more photos of it:

















« Last Edit: May 31, 2018, 08:13:24 PM by crueby »

Offline Flyboy Jim

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #69 on: October 29, 2016, 05:56:56 AM »
Oh wow...........that's an incredible model Chris! Especially considering how you came across the plans.

Thanks for the details and pictures.

Jim
Sherline 4400 Lathe
Sherline 5400 Mill
"You can do small things on big machines, but you can do small things on small machines".

Offline Steamer5

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #70 on: October 29, 2016, 09:34:02 AM »
DAM that's nice!

Cheers Kerrin
Get excited and make something!

Offline fumopuc

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #71 on: October 29, 2016, 10:16:09 AM »
Hi Chris, I do like your Lombard Hauler project very much. I will follow with big interest. I am also impressed by the "Shay" type concept of this hauler.
By the way, nice sailboat.
Lombard HaulerLombard Hauler
Kind Regards
Achim

Offline wagnmkr

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #72 on: October 29, 2016, 12:17:38 PM »
Some folk are just flat out good at everything they do! What a superb job on the ship! Gorgeous!

Tom
I was cut out to be rich ... but ... I was sown up all wrong!

Offline scc

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #73 on: October 29, 2016, 02:06:21 PM »
A stunning ship model.... Well done indeed :NotWorthy:         Terry


(And I'm following along on the Lombard and loving that too.)

Offline Don1966

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Re: Chris' Build of a Lombard Hauler Engine
« Reply #74 on: October 29, 2016, 05:58:14 PM »
Damn son you been busy! Quiet impressive work Chris with so much amazing talent. I will definitely be following along on this build....... :ThumbsUp:


 :popcorn:
Don