Author Topic: COLUMBINE - The Boat  (Read 22624 times)

Offline bent

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Re: COLUMBINE - The Boat
« Reply #120 on: November 20, 2017, 08:54:00 PM »
What a cool project.  Looking great so far, Robert!  :popcorn:

Offline Robert Hornby

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Re: COLUMBINE - The Boat
« Reply #121 on: December 10, 2017, 04:34:20 AM »
I managed to locate some Teak from a fellow "Men's Shed" member. It was from old furniture which had been dismantled. I cut some up and laminated them together as I plan to do with the decking and then applied some clear polyurethane lacquer. The colour of the Teak was much darker than I would like so I tried the same test with Tasmanian Oak and I am much happier with it's colour. 


This is the Teak as given to me.



Cutting the oak into 8mm strips.



Milling down the strips to 6.4mm thickness



Gluing together.




A trial piece of the fore deck knocked up from scrap wood, mainly to see how I was going to make the finished item. The deck has a pronounced convex shape to it, so some hand work will be in order here.
Age and treachery will always overcome youth and skill

Offline Robert Hornby

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Re: COLUMBINE - The Boat
« Reply #122 on: June 29, 2018, 09:01:50 AM »
The decking is progressing quite well and going according to plan, though slowly due to other non workshop jobs.





I made my own disc sander for fine dressing of the edges. I was unable to find one at the hardware store.



And gluing the outer dress edge.



And now for the brain stretching to work out how to clamp the final 150mm of edging.



Robert
Age and treachery will always overcome youth and skill

Online Jasonb

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Re: COLUMBINE - The Boat
« Reply #123 on: June 29, 2018, 09:09:13 AM »
Just bandsaw a caul to go on the opposite side that follows the curve of the hull and then cut notches in it to take your clamps, holes would also work, I'd also use a caul on the other side to protect the strip from clamp marks.
« Last Edit: June 29, 2018, 09:16:34 AM by Jasonb »

Offline Robert Hornby

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Re: COLUMBINE - The Boat
« Reply #124 on: June 30, 2018, 12:52:32 AM »
Thank you Jason, that solution looks great and I will use it. The outer edges of the trim still have to be dressed level with the hull so any clamp marks will not be a problem.
Robert
Age and treachery will always overcome youth and skill

Offline crueby

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Re: COLUMBINE - The Boat
« Reply #125 on: June 30, 2018, 12:58:10 AM »
I've had similar issues clamping the sheer boards on full size boats - if the boards are dense enough, you can also run a small nail or pin or two at the inside edge of of a wedge, the pin digs into the wood to keep the clamp from sliding. On softer woods, the method Jason describes is a great one.
 :popcorn:

Offline Ramon

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Re: COLUMBINE - The Boat
« Reply #126 on: June 30, 2018, 08:30:58 AM »
Hi Robert - getting closer and looking real good  :ThumbsUp:

'Caul' is a new word to me Jason but I know what you mean. I found Robert, if you insert a folded piece of abrasive paper, abrasive sides outwards, between said clamp pieces and work that really helps enhance the grip too.

Not too long now I guess before that sees the water eh ? :)

Regards - Ramon
"I ain't here for the long time but I am here for a good time"
(a very apt phrase - thanks to a well meaning MEM friend)

Offline Robert Hornby

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Re: COLUMBINE - The Boat
« Reply #127 on: July 02, 2018, 07:24:31 AM »
Following Jason's suggestion of the clamping method I knocked a rough Caul and it worked beautifully  :cartwheel: :pinkelephant:



 



Age and treachery will always overcome youth and skill