Author Topic: "Dutchman"  (Read 1426 times)

Offline scc

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"Dutchman"
« on: June 13, 2016, 10:16:37 PM »
I recently posted on my Burrell 4" SCC thread (vehicles and models) a comment about fitting small pins under the heads of clevis pins to stop them rotating. I have always been told they are called "Dutchmen". I asked on the thread if anyone knew of the origin of this seemingly odd name. As I have had minimal response I thought I would try again in this section.                  Answers on a postcard............................ Terry

Online Jasonb

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Re: "Dutchman"
« Reply #1 on: June 14, 2016, 07:37:34 AM »
I have not heard the term used for these pins before. Have heard Dutchmen used in woodworking where they can be used to tie two halves of a split piece of timber together and stop them spreading.

Offline DTR

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Re: "Dutchman"
« Reply #2 on: June 14, 2016, 08:28:32 AM »

I have not heard the term used for these pins before. Have heard Dutchmen used in woodworking where they can be used to tie two halves of a split piece of timber together and stop them spreading.

In woodworking a Dutchman is normally just a piece of timber that is let in to replace a defect or damage. When it is used to stabilise a split, it's known as a butterfly due to the shape :)

Back on topic, that looks like a neat idea
Dave

Offline Maryak

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Re: "Dutchman"
« Reply #3 on: June 15, 2016, 02:00:02 AM »
I always thought they were known as keeps, lugs or locators. I too had not heard the term Dutchman.

Regards
Bob
« Last Edit: June 15, 2016, 02:32:45 AM by Maryak »
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