Author Topic: A smaller Boring and Facing head  (Read 6287 times)

Offline Stuart

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Re: A smaller Boring and Facing head
« Reply #15 on: March 17, 2016, 05:01:56 PM »
Don

I have the book ,had it a long time that's where I found the dog clutch , working with Gray he produced a set of drawings for the big bore Myford
This is a new design smaller than the one in the book , I must say it sound the dog dangly bits


Chris
Hope Gray does not mind but it's a boring and facing head as you say it can bore , but it can face as well you hold the collar and it put on the cut itself . Hence a bore with a true face

They have many more uses

Stuart
My aim is for a accurate part with a good finish

Offline Graham Meek

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Re: A smaller Boring and Facing head
« Reply #16 on: March 17, 2016, 05:15:45 PM »
Hi Chris,

Here is an example of facing the cylinder barrel location face on a side valve engine square with the cylinder location hole. Plus a picture of the Old Boring and Facing Head to show the torque arm which makes the feed ring remain stationary while the head rotates. It is because this part is stationary that the boring head auto feeds.

Stuart,

No problem,

My best regards
Gray,

Online Jo

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Re: A smaller Boring and Facing head
« Reply #17 on: March 17, 2016, 05:55:03 PM »
Hi Chris, an automatic facing head has a gear on the screw that is used to adjust the bore diameter, the ring that is held stationary has a ratchet on it that engages in that gear each time it goes round. If the ring that is attached to the ratchet is held still then each time the head goes round it pushes the screw around a little bit so you get automatic feed.

Now you need some sort of stop that you can set and a clutch to prevent it going too far: So as the screw goes round it comes up against the stop and the clutch prevents the ratchet from pushing the adjusting screw any further round.


So an example: if you wanted an undercut in a bore you would poke your boring head in and adjust the stop to let the boring bar move outwards into the bore. Then you could under power bore down just like you would on a lathe, back to the top add a bit more under cut under power.... on you go. I have attached a few more examples of what you can do with one

Jo
Usus est optimum magister

Offline petertha

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Re: A smaller Boring and Facing head
« Reply #18 on: March 17, 2016, 06:23:22 PM »
The plans for the larger 66 mm diameter boring head shown in "the Clan" are in "Projects for your Workshop Vol 1" as well as a good descriptive text on how to cut dovetails painlessly.
I had no idea a book was available. Found this link.But no delivery to Canada
http://www.amazon.co.uk/RDGTOOLS-Projects-your-Workshop-Graham/dp/B00S9SOJ1G

Found it in Tee. No international shipping info on website, anybody know?

I don't see available in Amazon N-Am but did see on ebay. What an oh-so-familiar bummer. Any recommendation as to how to procure to Canada?

Offline tangler

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Re: A smaller Boring and Facing head
« Reply #19 on: March 17, 2016, 07:19:41 PM »

Found it in Tee. No international shipping info on website, anybody know?


Have a look at "postage" under "Additional Information" at the bottom of the left hand bar on the TEE website

HTH
Rod

Online crueby

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Re: A smaller Boring and Facing head
« Reply #20 on: March 17, 2016, 07:39:10 PM »
Hi Chris, an automatic facing head has a gear on the screw that is used to adjust the bore diameter, the ring that is held stationary has a ratchet on it that engages in that gear each time it goes round. If the ring that is attached to the ratchet is held still then each time the head goes round it pushes the screw around a little bit so you get automatic feed.

Now you need some sort of stop that you can set and a clutch to prevent it going too far: So as the screw goes round it comes up against the stop and the clutch prevents the ratchet from pushing the adjusting screw any further round.


So an example: if you wanted an undercut in a bore you would poke your boring head in and adjust the stop to let the boring bar move outwards into the bore. Then you could under power bore down just like you would on a lathe, back to the top add a bit more under cut under power.... on you go. I have attached a few more examples of what you can do with one

Jo

Thanks Jo - great diagram! Looks like an incredibly versitile tool, and one you could get into trouble with very quickly if not set up right!

Offline petertha

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Re: A smaller Boring and Facing head
« Reply #21 on: March 18, 2016, 12:36:20 AM »
Have a look at "postage" under "Additional Information" at the bottom of the left hand bar on the TEE website
HTH Rod
Missed that detail, thank you! Ordered!
« Last Edit: March 18, 2016, 12:47:15 AM by petertha »

Offline Graham Meek

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Re: A smaller Boring and Facing head
« Reply #22 on: April 03, 2016, 06:33:16 PM »
As promised a couple of photographs of the boring and facing head in use.

In the first photograph the boring head has sized the bore for the ball bearing race. Then using the automatic radial feed the bottom face of the bore was cleaned up and lastly, "caught in the act", facing the mounting face which bolts to the engine. Another cut has to be taken to reduce the flange thickness and clean-up the entire face.

The second photograph shows a similar facing operation under way, cleaning up the cover mounting face. I did try to fly-cut this face initially but the finish was awful, using the automatic facing facility produced a chatter free finish without any problem. Each individual face is cleaned up by stepping over the co-ordinates for each of the gear centres. The height setting remains constant throughout the operation and therefore all three faces are in the same plane. One more cut has to be taken to bring the flange thickness to the correct size and two more ball race bores have to be bored within the fabrication. This will ensure these bores are square to the cover face.

My best regards
Gray,