Author Topic: Making a small marine steam engine the beginners way.  (Read 12498 times)

Offline crueby

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Re: Making a small marine steam engine the beginners way.
« Reply #45 on: June 04, 2016, 08:41:47 PM »
Very nice!!

Offline Gas_mantle

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Re: Making a small marine steam engine the beginners way.
« Reply #46 on: June 04, 2016, 09:00:51 PM »
Thanks guys :-)

I need to get round the timing problem - either cylinder will easily run the engine on i's own so it kind of suggests they are both set correctly as individuals but when they are both under power the engine runs more slowly - they were both under power in the video.

Is it likely that the timing (or valve position) needs adjusting or does that suggest something else is at fault ?

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Making a small marine steam engine the beginners way.
« Reply #47 on: June 04, 2016, 10:28:21 PM »
Looking great!  :ThumbsUp:

On an airbrush compressor? What kind of pressure was it giving?

For whatever reason, I thought the engine was smaller. The video (i.e. your hands) put it into perspective.
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Offline crueby

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Re: Making a small marine steam engine the beginners way.
« Reply #48 on: June 04, 2016, 10:33:04 PM »
Hmmm... If the timing was off, seems like you would accentuate the problem when just running one one side. Since it is slower with BOTH, I'd suspect the air supply cannot deliver the same pressure and volume when both are going. You mention an airbrush compressor. If it has no tank for a resevoir, that is probably the issue - the compressor cannot put out enough volume to supply both cylinders at the same pressure as just one. Do you have a pressure gauge you can put inline? If so, and if that is the problem, you would see a lower reading when both are connected than just one. That is a pretty good size cylinder, could be eating a lot of air, and airbrush compressors are not known for putting out high volumes.

The engine looks great!   :cheers:

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Making a small marine steam engine the beginners way.
« Reply #49 on: June 04, 2016, 11:16:19 PM »
That looks mighty fine to me Peter. And yes, it is bigger than I had thought but well done all around!!

Bill

Offline pgp001

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Re: Making a small marine steam engine the beginners way.
« Reply #50 on: June 05, 2016, 10:56:19 AM »
There you Peter, I told you everyone would be appreciative and supportive.

The engine is very impressive and looks to run pretty well, I agree with the comment that your compressor might be struggling to keep up though.
I have a bigger compressor if you want to bring the engine and give it a try sometime. The other thing you could do is rig up a reservoir, an old car wheel and tyre would do as a start.
I did that and then progressed onto an old calor gas bottle, prior to getting a bigger compressor.

Phil

Offline Gas_mantle

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Re: Making a small marine steam engine the beginners way.
« Reply #51 on: June 05, 2016, 11:11:58 AM »
Thanks for the replies everyone,

As for the compressor issue, I hadn't really thought about it till it was mentioned - it hasn't got a tank or a pressure gauge so I'm not sure what it gives out.

At the moment I'm using 8mm ID cheap aquarium air line, it's very thin walled and because the compressor hasn't got a regulator valve it means the tube balloons near the compressor outlet - it is so thin in does actually explode after a few minutes running !  I've got round the problem temporarily by slightly opening another outlet so part of the air vents to atmosphere.  This means of course I am losing some of the pressure.

The fact that the airline swells up up suggests to me it isn't capable of passing the amount of air the compressor can deliver ?  I'm inclined to think a larger bore tube and slightly larger inlets on the engine itself would improve things and allow each cylinder to function better when working together.

It's a sunny day here in Yorkshire so I'm going to have a few hours tinkering with it outside.

Phil I'll see how it performs after a bit of work but if need be I make take up the offer of trying it on your compressor :-)

Thanks
Peter.

Offline gary.a.ayres

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Re: Making a small marine steam engine the beginners way.
« Reply #52 on: September 28, 2018, 09:20:05 AM »
A significant step in your impressively short journey from beginner to skilled engine builder.

Nice one!

 :ThumbsUp:

Offline Ramon

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Re: Making a small marine steam engine the beginners way.
« Reply #53 on: September 28, 2018, 02:27:50 PM »
Hello Peter - I've just caught up with this thread and would like to say a big 'congratulations' on such a fine result and particularly so with the limited resources you had at your disposal. Nothing should inspire people more to have a go than seeing examples such as this. Having good kit is one thing - being able to achieve something like this without it is totally another - well done indeed :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp:

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Offline Gas_mantle

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Re: Making a small marine steam engine the beginners way.
« Reply #54 on: September 28, 2018, 02:55:11 PM »
Thanks guys,

To be honest it's a cosmetic disaster, everything is out of proportion and it's just an ugly looking thing. It kinda demonstrates that when you make something without any plans and just rely on what's in your head then things don't always turn out right. It was a great learning curve though and gave me chance to try out a few techniques I'd never used before.

I made it pretty much on the kitchen table using just a small lathe and a few files so I suppose that's my excuse for the way it turned out.  :Lol:

I never quite finished it by adding an extra support bearing outside of the flywheel or a few other details that needed doing. Once I proved to myself it was a runner I cannibalised it to use the barstock on other projects.   ---  R.I.P the ugly marine engine  :D

On the plus side it was a decent little runner though and could give a nasty kick :-


Offline Ye-Ole Steam Dude

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Re: Making a small marine steam engine the beginners way.
« Reply #55 on: September 28, 2018, 04:01:48 PM »
Hello Peter,

From the video it is quite nice looking and a good runner, one that you should be proud of.

Have a great day,
Thomas

Offline propforward

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Re: Making a small marine steam engine the beginners way.
« Reply #56 on: September 28, 2018, 07:04:49 PM »
I second that. To be honest, what Gas_Mantle rates as ugly, kicks my best effort to date into a cocked hat, and that's not an exaggeration.
Stuart

Offline JC54

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Re: Making a small marine steam engine the beginners way.
« Reply #57 on: September 28, 2018, 07:27:13 PM »
Hello Peter,
         As a beginner this motor has given me some ideas to get around some parts that I was not sure of being able to machine. I like the action with the extension through the top of the cylinder, helping to eliminate the need for accurate crosslides . I would not call this motor ugly I just love the action...

Offline Gas_mantle

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Re: Making a small marine steam engine the beginners way.
« Reply #58 on: September 28, 2018, 08:11:36 PM »
Thanks guys,

It's a crude engine and very much a beginner barstock project that I used really as a bit of a learning exercise for myself.

I'd love to be able to build an elaborate model like some of the highly skilled members here but until that's possible I'm happy to post a few simpler builds in the hope someone else new to the game might think 'I can build one of those'.

Learning model engineering from being a beginner isn't going to happen in a week but with some very basic tools and a bit of forum advice it's possible to build very satisfying working engines very quickly. The little engine I made in this thread has a lot wrong with it (hence I cannibalised it) but I think you'll agree it's a decent little runner. The basic idea works so I'd like to think another beginner can look at it and see its an easy build then improve on the design and maybe build something along similar lines.

There's a wealth of great advice on this form and it is all free if you ask, I'd strongly advise any other newbies to post their simpler build logs and ask questions along the way.

The 'Ugly marine engine' would have been a damn sight more ugly without the advice of members here  ;)

Peter.


Offline Jeff123

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Re: Making a small marine steam engine the beginners way.
« Reply #59 on: October 02, 2018, 07:09:22 PM »
Hi Peter,

First time I've looked at this thread, read all the posts in one go!!!!

I like it , well done and I admire your adventurous approach.

I am a beginner and currently designing a small freelance oscillator. like you much of the design is all in my head, hope it turns out as well as yours.

Yes I do intend to start a build log. Still planning at the moment!!

Treat yourself to days fishing as a reward for your endeavours

Geoff :) :)