Author Topic: Melting crankshafts  (Read 1431 times)

Offline airmodel

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Melting crankshafts
« on: January 25, 2016, 05:11:39 AM »
Hi everyone

I was running low on scrap cast iron to melt so I dismantled some lawn mower engines and melted the crankshafts, have a look at the video 

Offline PStechPaul

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Re: Melting crankshafts
« Reply #1 on: January 25, 2016, 08:35:34 AM »
Very interesting. You make it look easy, but I'm sure that's from years of practice and learning. I would assume the crankshafts were some sort of alloy, and not just carbon steel, so what do you think the resulting metal is? And do you use further heat treatment to reduce the brittleness and increase strength?

Offline ths

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Re: Melting crankshafts
« Reply #2 on: January 25, 2016, 11:03:39 AM »
Nice looking iron you ended up with. Did you cut it in half on a bandsaw, the clean it on a linisher? Cheers, Hugh.

Online Jasonb

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Re: Melting crankshafts
« Reply #3 on: January 25, 2016, 11:46:51 AM »
Does the Ferrosilicon make the iron more like a grey iron as I would have thought that crankshafts would have been done with spheroidal iron?

Looks to be a nice pour.

Offline airmodel

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Re: Melting crankshafts
« Reply #4 on: January 26, 2016, 11:16:42 PM »
PStechpaul Crankshafts were cast iron before melting and still cast iron after pouring and I will not heat treat afterwards.

ths Cut it in half with a angle grinder and then put it on a linisher.

Jasonb Ferrosilicon softens cast iron.

Offline Myrickman

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Re: Melting crankshafts
« Reply #5 on: February 14, 2016, 04:16:22 PM »
Always enjoy your posts airmodel. Very informative and clear. Thanks Paul