Author Topic: RLE questions!  (Read 21171 times)

Offline Jasonb

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Re: RLE questions!
« Reply #90 on: February 22, 2016, 07:47:07 AM »
Most of the construction ones were just done with my phone an aging HTC Wildfire S but it started to not focus so I'm now using a small Sony cybershot WX350. Photos of finished engine were with an equally aging Minolta Dimage.

Workshop pics are just with the fluro tubes no flash and finished ones natural light in the conservatory again without flash but with tripod and remote release.

Offline Manorfarmdenton

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Re: RLE questions!
« Reply #91 on: February 22, 2016, 09:33:49 AM »
I must try harder!  I take mine with a Canon 500D, usually with a Canon EFS 17-85mm lens, but there doesn't seem to be enough light in the workshop to not use flash, and the house is worse - old with small windows.  I'm going to experiment!

John.
John Fearnley

Offline tangler

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Re: RLE questions!
« Reply #92 on: February 22, 2016, 10:01:08 AM »
Hi John,

I take my photos with an SLR (Nikon D90).  I usually set the camera to aperture priority at f11 or f16 to get good depth of focus.  I use a tripod as the shutter speeds tend to get extended but you can also try  increasing the ISO speed - I usually have mine on 800 or 1600. This will affect the quality but as I reduce my photos to 800 pixels wide and a Jpeg setting of 5 for publication on the web then the quality reduction won't show.

HTH,

Rod

Offline Manorfarmdenton

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Re: RLE questions!
« Reply #93 on: February 22, 2016, 12:21:36 PM »
Hi Rod,

Good thinking - I used to have a Fuji that kept defaulting to high ISO numbers whenever the battery went flat so the results were very grainy, so now I set the Canon to 100 (and always shoot in RAW).  As you say, the low ISO number isn't necessary at all for this purpose.  I've got a tripod and remote zapper too - why don't I use them!  Sloth probably  :)

Thanks for the suggestions.  John.
John Fearnley

Offline Manorfarmdenton

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Re: RLE questions!
« Reply #94 on: February 22, 2016, 10:36:29 PM »
Another question for those more experienced than me.  I've decided to play safe and make my own main bearing bushes rather than use the Oilite ones I bought.  That way, apart from the density issue I can incorporate flanges to locate the crank endwise.  Do I use brass or bronze?  I've got some brass round of suitable diameter in stock, but I'd need to buy some bronze.
John.
John Fearnley

Online Jo

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Re: RLE questions!
« Reply #95 on: February 23, 2016, 07:01:44 AM »
You use bronze, Brass is not a suitable bearing material  :ShakeHead:.

Jo
Usus est optimum magister

Offline Jasonb

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Re: RLE questions!
« Reply #96 on: February 23, 2016, 07:28:24 AM »
Yes bronze, I usually use SA660 leaded bronze

You can buy flanged oilite bearings that is what has been supplied in two of the engine kits I have made

Offline Manorfarmdenton

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Re: RLE questions!
« Reply #97 on: February 23, 2016, 02:03:50 PM »
Thanks.  Bronze it is. 

Jason, I had second thought about the oilite bushes, flanged or straight, because of the density issue.  Do you think they are ok for mains then?  If they are it saves a little while on the lathe.  I've got the straight ones in at the moment - they were tight in the 9/16" reamed caps as you predicted, and are a good fit on the crank after reaming to 7/16".

John.
John Fearnley

Offline Roger B

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Re: RLE questions!
« Reply #98 on: February 23, 2016, 02:09:28 PM »
A lot depends on what you are going to do with the engine. If it runs for a few minutes a few times a year to show to friends oilite (why does it keep changing to iolite  ::) ) will be fine. if you are intending to use it for long periods under load bronze will be better. If you are going to use bronze be aware that it can snatch badly during drilling and reaming.
Best regards

Roger

Offline Jasonb

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Re: RLE questions!
« Reply #99 on: February 23, 2016, 02:50:13 PM »
The couple of engines that did have the oilite bearings have both been rehomed so I don't know how well they have stood the test of time but I don't think either gets run very often so as Roger says should be OK for light use. These were well known and popular American kits so I would have though they would have stopped supplying the bushes if there head been negative feedback.

Online Jo

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Re: RLE questions!
« Reply #100 on: February 23, 2016, 03:09:17 PM »
If you choose to machine oilite or other sintered bearings don't forget that, due to the turning temperature, they will loose their oil during the turning process. The oil should be replaced before use, which is not difficult just immerse the bearing in SAE 20 starting at 80 degrees and let it and the oil cool naturally. (And don't forget if you operate oilite above 70 degrees it will quickly loose all of its oil  :( )

I have normally used oilite for slow moving bearings that are difficult to lubricate.

Jo
Usus est optimum magister

Offline Manorfarmdenton

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Re: RLE questions!
« Reply #101 on: February 23, 2016, 05:37:35 PM »
Whichever bushes I use, they will be fitted with a greaser like the ones on the Red Wings, as will the big end.  I use the ordinary grease I have for the full sized machinery, which seems to be fine.  I only bought oilite because they were readily available from my trade supplier, not for their lubricating properties.  John.
John Fearnley

Offline Manorfarmdenton

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Re: RLE questions!
« Reply #102 on: February 15, 2018, 06:00:27 PM »
Jo - apologies for posting in your thread about the RLE!  I had a thread of my own but somehow got lost - put it down to fast-approaching senility!
In this thread you said  <<I don't know which thread set you have been using on the remainder of the model. But please, please keep to one thread type don't mix them>>  So wise!  I have used every thread under the sun on this project and now spend ages trying to ascertain whether a stud is metric, Imperial, or BA!

Jason - I think the saying has it that imitation is the sincerest form of flattery? :)  I have just installed the Hall effect sensor as advised by you.  The equipment from Minimag seems to work perfectly, at least in set-up mode.

Re. machining the base to take holding-down bolts, I used a long-reach 10mm end mill but broke it on the first pad through clumsiness!  I then Loctited a short one into a length of 1/2" silver steel and with a lot more care machined the other three without further mishap.  The holes were drilled with a long series 4mm drill to take 3BA or 4mm bolts.

I haven't done anything about the carburettor yet.  That's about all there is left to do.  The casting that came with the bits and pieces I bought on eBay leaves a bit to be desired.  One of the little holding-down lugs is very miss-shapen.  I'm wondering whether to fabricate one to that design or whether to buy a Lunkenheimer casting from Forest Classics and go down that route.  Any suggestions Jason and Graham? 

Carl - off-topic, but a couple of photos of what a mole drainer looks like when its ready for work.

John.

John Fearnley

Offline Jasonb

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Re: RLE questions!
« Reply #103 on: February 15, 2018, 06:39:43 PM »
That does not look as much fun as a couple of Fowler's pulling the mole drainer between them.

The Lunks are quite fiddly to make but they seem to work well enough and you don't need to worry about the tank being higher than the carb. But a simple venturi with a tube in te middle will work just as well.

As for mixing threads on an engine what is one to do with a metric M10x1 plug, BSP larger pipe fittings, 40tpi ME threads for various bits like oilers though Metric fine can be used but that means using metric stock on an imperial model and then general fixings in either metric coarse or BA, almost impossible to keep to one thread form. And if it's a big model and you need larger than 0BA then thats another thread form to add.

Offline Alyn Foundry

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Re: RLE questions!
« Reply #104 on: February 15, 2018, 07:11:51 PM »
Hi John.

Letís have another of your excellent photos of the miss shapen carburettor casting, we can move on from there.

The R.L.E.ís carburettor was borne of a similar one fitted to an American stationary engine I once owned called a Pilter. This was so simple but worked so well that I scaled it down to work for the R.L.E. My first attempt of a carburettor, shown on the main drawing, didnít work at all well. The vibration caused the ball valve to let the fuel column fall and the engine would starve. The Mk 2, scale Pilter carburettor sits directly on top of the fuel tank and is virtually unaffected by vibration.

Cheers Graham.