Author Topic: Retlas  (Read 67660 times)

Offline Jasonb

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Re: Retlas
« Reply #270 on: March 01, 2017, 08:19:01 PM »
That is heat shrink, just don't overdo the heat when shrinking it. Holding the soldering iron near the sleeve will shrink it and won't put anywhere near as much heat into the sensor as the actual soldering did

Offline Chipmaster

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Re: Retlas
« Reply #271 on: March 01, 2017, 09:17:10 PM »
Thanks for the information Jason, I hope my soldering doesn't destroy the sensor.

Andy

Offline Bluechip

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Re: Retlas
« Reply #272 on: March 01, 2017, 09:30:28 PM »
Hello Dave,
Yes we are looking at one of these http://minimagneto.co.uk/documents/MCL-1.pdf.

Could you tell me what the insulating sleeves are likely to be on my sensor so I can order some and should I use some sort of heat sink when I solder the three wires onto the sensor? I am concerned heat shrinking insulation might destroy the sensor.

Andy

I use one of these for heat-shrink :

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Bosch-PHG-600-3-Heat-Gun/dp/B0001GRV4Q/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1488402927&sr=8-1&keywords=bosch+hot+air+gun

Well, not that one but similar. Mine is donkey's years old  .... personally designed by Bob himself ..  ;D

Don't buy heat-shrink. Send me your address by PM and I'll send you a selection. Got oodles of the damn stuff here.

Best way to solder is make sure the iron is really hot and tin the wires and leads first. Then touch the wire, lead and iron bit together and it's done. You have enough solder on the parts, no need for more. Solder one connection then wait for about 30 secs. and do the next. This avoids heat build up in the device. ( Although I don't bother and have not killed one of mine yet, but I do have a Weller Station which is temp. controlled. )
Unless you really roast them most devices are fairly robust.

If you are doubtful you can put two aluminium angle bits in your vice jaws and gently grip the plastic bit with the leads sticking up. This will act as a heat sink.

Dave




« Last Edit: March 01, 2017, 09:37:55 PM by Bluechip »

Offline Chipmaster

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Re: Retlas
« Reply #273 on: March 06, 2017, 05:26:33 PM »
I used a piece of 3.5" continuous cast iron bar to make a pile of swarf and a pulley for the engine yesterday in anticipation of being able to build a dynamo to go with it.

P1060288 by Andy, on Flickr

Here's a short video of the engine making a nice chugging sound this afternoon.


Andy

Online Jo

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Re: Retlas
« Reply #274 on: March 06, 2017, 05:31:08 PM »
 8)

Andy do you not have problems with your propane heater causing rust in your workshop  :paranoia:

Jo
Enjoyment is more important than achievement.

Offline Chipmaster

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Re: Retlas
« Reply #275 on: March 06, 2017, 06:00:50 PM »
Gosh Jo and what about the vapour from the engine exhaust?
Actually I get very little rust and how much of that is attributable to the butane gas heater I can't tell. I find lathe chucks and flywheel rims are the most vulnerable to rust in my garage. However, I do keep everything very well oiled. :LittleAngel:
My detached uninsulated garage workshop is 20ft square and a bit draughty but it would be too cold for me during the winter without heat, I have the portable heater right by me wherever I'm working. I'm not out there all day every day. Reckon I use three bottles of gas over the winter and currently I'm being charged 28 for a 15kg refill I wonder if there are effective affordable alternatives?

Andy

Offline Jasonb

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Re: Retlas
« Reply #276 on: March 06, 2017, 06:30:23 PM »
And don't forget the steam comming off that mug of tea :disappointed:

Offline Chipmaster

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Re: Retlas
« Reply #277 on: March 06, 2017, 06:37:44 PM »
Yes Jason, reckon I should limit the number of hot drinks visitors get!
Andy

Online Jo

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Re: Retlas
« Reply #278 on: March 06, 2017, 07:08:00 PM »
Gosh Jo and what about the vapour from the engine exhaust?

I would be more bothered about breathing in the carbon monoxide coming out of it  :slap:

Quote
I'm not out there all day every day. Reckon I use three bottles of gas over the winter and currently I'm being charged 28 for a 15kg refill I wonder if there are effective affordable alternatives?

That's like spraying your beloved machine tools with a water mister every evening before you leave them to chill out over night ... that water vapour is in turn attracting the rust bug  :paranoia:

New house... new workshop.... sounds like it needs a log burner to keep them warm and drylining would help  :)

Jo

Enjoyment is more important than achievement.

Offline Chipmaster

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Re: Retlas
« Reply #279 on: March 06, 2017, 07:37:27 PM »
Yes a log burner would be excellent. I had a nice Spencer wood burner in a large shed / workshop two houses ago, made the workshop so cosy  :smokin2:
I've been using the butane portable heater for about 20 years and ventilation has probably kept rust at bay.
How do you heat your workshop?

Andy

Offline scalemodel

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Re: Retlas
« Reply #280 on: March 06, 2017, 07:50:07 PM »
Andy
I heat my workshop with a lot burner with us great all ways ad I get head and a cooking surface for a kettle and frying pan!!
The fact I can make hot drinks is ideal as before I have the fire I never drank enough once I got going and nearly passed out a couple of times.
If you was thinking of a fire I maybe able to fix you up as I got a newish pot belly stove lying about.

P.s the retlas is lovely!!!

Online Jo

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Re: Retlas
« Reply #281 on: March 06, 2017, 07:50:56 PM »
How do you heat your workshop?

Solar Power dumped into a night storage heater. At this time of the year if the sun is out I get enough free juice on top of the 1.5KW the night storage heater uses to top it up with a 1.5 Kw fan heater while I am making swarf over lunchtime  ;D The days I know the sun won't come out it costs me a fortune (nearly 40p a day :disappointed:) to top up night storage heater using my economy 7. I priced up a log burner but decided for the few days that I need to top up the solar powered heater I would never get my money back.

I had a butane/propane heater in my previous workshop until someone pointed out where all the rust was coming from. It is not the surfaces you oil that is the problem it is all those you miss  :(

I do have a log burner but I use that to heat the house and a second house hold night storage heater gets the excess solar power in the afternoon  :naughty:

Jo
Enjoyment is more important than achievement.

Offline Chipmaster

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Re: Retlas
« Reply #282 on: March 06, 2017, 08:45:06 PM »
Hi Jonathan,
Very nice, sounds like a wild workshop or there are typos in your opening sentence :LittleDevil:

There are so many flammable liquids - paints and solvents in my garage that I would be wary of having a wood burner that might have to be left unattended.

When I fitted a wood burner in my shed perhaps 30 years ago, the Selkirk twin wall flue and cowl cost more than the wood burner!

Cheers
Andy
« Last Edit: March 06, 2017, 09:25:26 PM by Chipmaster »

Offline Chipmaster

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Re: Retlas
« Reply #283 on: March 06, 2017, 08:50:29 PM »
Sounds like you've got it nicely sorted out Jo.
Bring on the warmer weather  :whoohoo:
Andy

Offline Chipmaster

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Re: Retlas
« Reply #284 on: March 07, 2017, 07:24:05 PM »
Hi Dave, a photo to show that I used a little of the heat shrink sleeve you sent to me. The sensor came from CPC Farnell, cost only 1.19 and it works. Although my soldering isn't neat at least it didn't destroy the sensor. Thanks for your help.

P1060301 (2) by Andy, on Flickr

Andy