Author Topic: A short DRO story---  (Read 2529 times)

Offline Brian Rupnow

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A short DRO story---
« on: November 10, 2015, 09:17:20 PM »
Literally---A short DRO. Although my new lathe has a lot of carriage travel, most of the work I do on models will be made using the topslide to move the tool longitudinally, with the carriage locked in position.  Although the dials are marked in thousandths of an inch, and I don't really need the DRO, it is certainly nice when doing something like cutting fins on an air cooled cylinder to be able to "zero" the measuring device after each cut, instead of trying to remember all the dial settings and keep track of the math in my head. The total longitudinal travel of my topslide is only 1.650", so a 4" digital caliper works just fine for what I need and can be "zeroed" after each cut. It's a bit difficult to see exactly what I done in the photograph, but the solid model shows it a bit better. Anything shown in grey is part of the lathe. Anything shown in color is new stuff I have added.----Brian


Offline Tennessee Whiskey

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Re: A short DRO story---
« Reply #1 on: November 10, 2015, 10:40:23 PM »
It must be a totally British inspired thing, as I never use my "top slide " or compound as us old redneck machinist call it,  for anything but cutting a taper or theading .  I usually just keep mine set where the handle is out of the way.  The rest I do with the cross slide and carriage.  Ain't sure of the exchange rate,  just my two cents worth. 

Cletus

Online Jim Nic

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Re: A short DRO story---
« Reply #2 on: November 11, 2015, 12:10:34 AM »
I rather think it may be a Canadian thing, Cletus.   ;)
As a Brit I'm with you since after I use the topslide for taper cutting I return it to centre using only the marking inscribed on the carriage.  I know this not to be particularly accurate and if I have a reason to use the topslide for a parallel cut I check my setting with a DTI in the toolpost and a test bar.
Having said that, Brian's device suits his way of working, seems a good way to make use of a 4" caliper and let's face it there ain't no right or wrong way to enjoy a hobby.   :)
Jim
The person who never made a mistake never made anything.

Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: A short DRO story---
« Reply #3 on: November 11, 2015, 01:14:47 AM »
There is some "method behind my madness". My previous lathe had a handle and dial on the right hand end of the leadscrew. This let me advance the carriage by hand in a very controlled manner by turning the handle, and it was very accurate. My new large lathe does not have this ever so handy handle, and I find that trying to advance the carriage by means of the large wheel on the front of the apron to be very coarse and impossible to do so with any accuracy, unless the lathe is kitted out with a full DRO set.  By using a dial gauge to set my topslide up parallel to the main lathe axis, I once again have the control and accuracy I was accustomed to having on my old lathe----but only for relatively short travel. ---Brian.

Offline 10KPete

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Re: A short DRO story---
« Reply #4 on: November 11, 2015, 01:50:22 AM »
I use the compound when I need close control of the cut in the long direction, like the depth of a groove or the like. I find
the carriage hand wheel is not sensitive enough for very close work. But that's the only time. Other wise the compound is
set at 29.5* for threading.

Nice mount Brian!

Pete
Craftsman, Tinkerer, Curious Person.
Retired, finally!
SB 10K lathe, Benchmaster mill. And stuff.

Offline mikemill

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Re: A short DRO story---
« Reply #5 on: November 11, 2015, 09:52:28 AM »
Digital scales are very useful gadgets, as I have a taper turning attachment fitted to my Super 7 I have no mounting place for glass scale based DRO, so I fitted digital scales to saddle, cross slide, and tailstock some years ago and would not be without them now. The only downside is remembering to turn them off!! There were some scales available that had a built in timer thus turning off, but I could not find them.

Mike

Offline BillTodd

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Re: A short DRO story---
« Reply #6 on: November 15, 2015, 11:56:27 AM »
Nice mod Brian :)


Nothing wrong using the top-slide. In fact, if the lathe carriage is worn and cutting a taper, then adjusting  the top-slide maybe the most accurate way to turn short lengths.

[edit] I saw a lathe on Tony's site with a find-feed carriage adaption on the right side of the apron , blowed if i can remember the name of the thing :old:
« Last Edit: November 15, 2015, 12:00:29 PM by BillTodd »
Bill
wy omnibus Latinis taurus stercore?

Offline rotorhead

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Re: A short DRO story---
« Reply #7 on: November 21, 2015, 02:55:00 PM »
Hi Folks,

I approached the same objective slightly differently, I constructed a 'Poor Man's ARO' from a 2" travel dial gauge from our friends at Syston, works a treat, also confirming the topslide feedscrew is accurate.

It's always best to use what you have, for whatever you need it for, I fitted my digital vernier to my pillar drill, Aldi strikes again.

Chris Wright
Ulceby, North Lincolnshire.UK
Colchester Master 6 1/2", Elliott Rapidmil, Clarkson Mk1+