Author Topic: My First Engine (s) - Another Elmer's Standby  (Read 13744 times)

Online Twizseven

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Re: My First Engine (s) - Another Elmer's Standby
« Reply #30 on: May 09, 2015, 11:39:01 PM »
Bill,

Thanks for the comments.

Well I made another pair of blocks today.  Milled the first 1/8" off using the Chester Superlux mill but finished off to final 9/16" with the Cowells.

Next task was to get them into the four jaw chuck and centralised on bore centre.  No problems with this just took my time.  Started with a centre drill and then on with 1/8", 1/4", 3/16", 1/4" and then 5/16" drills.  The Cowells does not have anough length to get any bigger drills in to the chuck on tailstock so now onto boring.  Next issue was to find a suitable boring tool bar.  Now onto my only ever second attempt at boring.  Tried a HSS tool which used to be my Dads, but was struggling a bit to clear the side of the bore at depth.  Had a nice 5mm Glanze boring bar but it only had  first three quarters inch of its length at that diameter so off to the grinder and thinned it down for another 3/8".  This now worked great.  Must admit counting up number of turns on the leadscrew began to get a bit boring (excuse the pun), 23 and 3/4 in and then 23 and 3/4's back out, timer and time again.  But got there in the end.  Finished off with large countersink for the champher at entrance to the bore.  Once one completed, the second was a little quicker.

Quite pleased with the finish in the bore and it appears parallel when tested with a 3/8" diameter test piece.



Two cylinders shown above.  Just need to make sure I do not drill into bore when drilling the holes for fixing to the upstand.


Colin

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: My First Engine (s) - Another Elmer's Standby
« Reply #31 on: May 09, 2015, 11:49:22 PM »
Those look good Colin and the bore finish looks very nice and should be fine as is. I agree counting handwheel turns is repetitive to say the least, but its a tried and true method that any machinist should be capable of in the absence of more modern methods. It keeps us on our toes :)

Bill

Offline arnoldb

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Re: My First Engine (s) - Another Elmer's Standby
« Reply #32 on: May 30, 2015, 08:07:54 PM »
Coming along really nicely Colin  :ThumbsUp: - the bore finish you got is excellent.

I know you just loosely assembled the engines in the second to last photo, but noticed that you have everything wrong-way around relative to the column...  Just thought I'd point that out - when it comes time to finish drilling the port hole into the bearing and final assembly, having things wrong way around will lead to a bit of heartache.  I've found that it's very good practice to always put things together in the intended positions when playing around even with loose assemblies or mock-ups, as one tends to "learn" the positions of parts rather quickly, and learning them the wrong way around can be a bit of a problem  ;)

Like Bill said, counting turns is a good thing!

Just take some care when drilling the mounting holes - if you have the option of using a depth-stop on your mill, that's a great way to prevent going too far, but once again, the machine dials are your friend.

Looking forward to your next update  :ThumbsUp:

Kind regards, Arnold

Building an engine takes Patience, Planning, Preparation and Machining.
Procrastination is nearly the same, but it precludes machining.
Thus, an engine will only be built once the procrastination stops and the machining begins!

Online Twizseven

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Re: My First Engine (s) - Another Elmer's Standby
« Reply #33 on: May 31, 2015, 06:42:10 PM »
Arnold, Bill,

Thanks for comments.  I must admit I'd not noticed that I had assembled it on wrong side, but realised once I had done the cylinder.  That is all drilled now.  The Z axis DRO on the Cowells mill was great for this.  Drilled and tapped a hole, then moved to the next one and used the drill chuck as guide for the tap. Just have the pistons to make, soldering of the air feed pipe to the bearing, and final assembling.  This will still take a few weeks fitting in around work and other stuff.

On the topic of counting turns I have a miniature counter with a little arm on it, did think this might be an idea to mount near leadscrew feed handle and let it count for me, its that or fit an X axis DRO to the Cowells ME90 lathe.

Regards.,

Colin

Online Twizseven

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Re: My First Engine (s) - Another Elmer's Standby
« Reply #34 on: July 07, 2015, 10:56:15 PM »
Finally got a bit further.  Decorating and carpeting, hall, stairs, landing, office, bedroom, kitchen along with work got in the way for last few weeks.

As office was being re-carpeted I had to move absolutely everything out, computers, filing cabinets, desks, work bench and Cowells Mill and lathe out.  Trouble is I can't find anything now I've tidied up.

Finally managed to put pistons on conrods and they appear to be a good fit in the cylinder.  Had to do a bit of relieving around the little end to ensure full range of movement in the piston.  Holding upside down and holding finger over the port the pistons and rods slide out very slowly.  If I pull them there is plenty of suction.



Silver soldering is the next thing to try - bearing and air feed pipe.

I need to shorten some unc 2#56 15mm long screws down to 9mm long.  Any advice on the best way to do this.  Current idea is to very carefully drill and tap a piece of 9mm thick steel, wind screw in and then grind of excess.

Colin

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: My First Engine (s) - Another Elmer's Standby
« Reply #35 on: July 08, 2015, 12:44:17 AM »
Looking good there Colin!!  As to shortening the screws the method you describe should work well and with 9mm through the stock there is plenty to hold the screws straight as you grind off the 6mm excess. If you have a belt sander that might even be better than using a grinder.

Bill

Online Twizseven

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Re: My First Engine (s) - Another Elmer's Standby
« Reply #36 on: July 26, 2015, 05:20:48 PM »
Finally managed to find time to get last few bits finished, other than a wooden base.

First off was the bearing and air feed..  First time ever tried to bed brass and also to solder it.  I did chicken out slightly and follow Arnolds lead and soft soldered rather that silver soldered the joint.

I have got oxy/acetylene kit and have a jewellers welding torch with tiny jets that I can use with it.  The issue with this if not too careful it is possible to melt the brasss,  After realizing I had just slightly melted the hose connector end I turned of the lights and could then see the red glow  (awkward when red/green colourblind).  The two air pipes bent okay.  AS I said I used ordinary resin cored solder, I put a small ring of it round the joint, then fluxed the joint.  I have a bottle of flux I have had around now for 40 plus years.  Bit of heat below the bearing and it flowed nicely.  Doing the second one it flowed a bit too well and blocked the air hole, necessitating melting solder back out and trying again.  Second time successfully
.
.


All bits ready for asembly



Then loctited the bearing into the body of the engine and left for hour or so to go off.  Then the fun of continuing the drilling into the bearing down through the frame.  I only had about 3/8" of drill shank to hold in the chuck and to drill through the brass. Had about 1/4" in the chuck, lined it up and drilled very carefully.  Brass plugs then made and fitted to block of the 1/16" hole (loctited these and then punched them in).  Then assembled both engines, picking best fit bits for each engine.

Finally, three views of the engines



Due to major dismantling of my office in the middle of doing these I had forgotten/mislaid the #2-56 unc dome head allen screws I had brought for the engine, and countersunk the body to take the #2-56 unc countersunk screws I had bought initially.  Doesn't look quite as nice with the screws but Heyho.





Now came the interesting bit, would they run.  Bit of 3 in 1 oil; and then stick them on the compressor, quick flick with the finger and away they each went in turn.   :pinkelephant: :whoohoo:

One appears fractionally slower than the other but I guess a few minutes running should cure that.  There are no knocking noises or anything like that, so very pleased.  I've built 20 plus car engines over the years and its nice to keep up record of no failures to start up to this point in time.  I'm sure this will change when I eventually try something significantly more difficult.

Just need to sort out a wooden base for them and a clean bit of hose and a 'T' piece and I can run them together.  Then get two nameplates (Kerry and Gina)

Colin

Offline Roger B

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Re: My First Engine (s) - Another Elmer's Standby
« Reply #37 on: July 26, 2015, 06:31:54 PM »
Nicely done  :praise2:  :praise2:
Best regards

Roger

Online Twizseven

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Re: My First Engine (s) - Another Elmer's Standby
« Reply #38 on: August 01, 2015, 02:58:19 PM »
Well they are running.  Just running them in on a small airbrush compressor.


Not too bad for a first attempt.

Colin
« Last Edit: August 01, 2015, 03:06:11 PM by Twizseven »

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: My First Engine (s) - Another Elmer's Standby
« Reply #39 on: August 01, 2015, 05:51:53 PM »
Well done Colin!!  Looks like they are running well at various speeds too.  So now that these are done, what will you tackle next?

Bill

Online Twizseven

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Re: My First Engine (s) - Another Elmer's Standby
« Reply #40 on: August 01, 2015, 06:03:48 PM »
Bill

Thank you for your comments. 

The one on the right is fractionally stiffer and needs a little flick of the flywheel, but if I set the cranks in the correct position they will both run as soon as the air is turned on.

I quite like the idea of a Webster.  I do have several sets of castings (Stuart half beam, S50 and No.9) but think these had better wait till I have a lot more experience.  The way work appears to be piling in at the moment I cannot see any free time until early next year.  I work for myself and sub contract out putting wireless networks in warehouses and factories.  Was thinking of retiring April next year ( at 66) but cannot see that happening maybe for another year.

Regards,

Colin

PS Webster has now been superceded.  Now have a Minnie Traction engine to complete.
« Last Edit: August 01, 2015, 08:43:04 PM by Twizseven »

Offline arnoldb

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Re: My First Engine (s) - Another Elmer's Standby
« Reply #41 on: August 10, 2015, 07:16:36 PM »
A bit late - Nicely done Colin  :ThumbsUp:

Looking forward to the Minnie.

Kind regards, Arnold
Building an engine takes Patience, Planning, Preparation and Machining.
Procrastination is nearly the same, but it precludes machining.
Thus, an engine will only be built once the procrastination stops and the machining begins!

Offline Alan Haisley

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Re: My First Engine (s) - Another Elmer's Standby
« Reply #42 on: August 12, 2015, 04:18:25 AM »
I'm glad both came out so well. With two daughters that's handy.  :ThumbsUp:
Near Raleigh, NC, USA

Online Twizseven

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Re: My First Engine (s) - Another Elmer's Standby
« Reply #43 on: August 12, 2015, 06:08:29 PM »
Arnold,
Thank you.  The Minnie is a different kettle of fish.  It has been through several peoples hands since being started in around 1999.  It is almost complete but has been partially painted in cellulose paint.  I don't think this will last if I manage to eventually fire it on coal, so I guess I'm going to have to strip the paint off and find something a bit more heat resistant.  I'm not sure what to use.  I guess something link Sperex might work but I'm open to advice.  I have to check through all the bits to see what is missing. I know I have to make all the ash pan and damper assembly,  the blowdown pipework from the sight glass, fit glass and gland nuts to the sight glass assembly, make the winch cable fairlead assembly, top for the oiler.  I also understand that to pass a steam test I need two means of getting water into the boiler, so will need some form of hand pump fitting in circuit with the standard boiler feed pump.

The pictures below show all bits I received.









Should be fun, but it will be a gradual back burner job.  Nice to get done before my old man pops his clogs just to prove I am capable of making things.  Not sure how long I've got, he is in good health but is 94.  Still occasionally uses his lathe but tends to be for wood turning or similar.  He still does marquetry to a high standard so I have a lot to live up to.  He worked for Cincinatti Milling Machines all his life the did a lot of jig and toolmaking after he retired.  Things have to be done properly.

Alan,

I'm glad as well,  although elder daughter did say "whats it do".  Her boyfriend will appreciate it if nothing else.

Regards,

Colin

Offline Roger B

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Re: My First Engine (s) - Another Elmer's Standby
« Reply #44 on: August 12, 2015, 07:13:47 PM »
That looks to be a fun challenge  :ThumbsUp:  :ThumbsUp: You need to find all the 'special features' that the other builders have added  ::)
Best regards

Roger