Author Topic: To the dark side CNC  (Read 19431 times)

Offline Jo

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Re: To the dark side CNC
« Reply #15 on: August 01, 2015, 05:19:13 PM »
I think it is time to mention....

 :pics:

Not that I am going to buy one  but we would like to have a little look at your new machine   ;D

Jo
Usus est optimum magister

Offline Vixen

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Re: To the dark side CNC
« Reply #16 on: August 01, 2015, 05:21:20 PM »
Hello H

Fusion 360 appears to require 64 bit versions of Win 7, Win 8 or Win 8.1 to run.
Mack 3 will not run on 64 bit versions of any of these OS. Mach 3 requires a  32 bit version of Win 2000, Win XP, Win Vista, or Win 7

CNC machining should be about hacking bits of metal to the required shape, but it soon degenerates to become hacking software instead.

Mike
« Last Edit: August 01, 2015, 05:47:11 PM by Vixen »
It is the journey that matters, not the destination

Offline kvom

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Re: To the dark side CNC
« Reply #17 on: August 01, 2015, 06:53:26 PM »
Fusion360, like Solidworks and several other modeling software products are for 3D modeling.  Only after the part is modeled do you produce a 2D view/drawing and export a DXF or similar for 2.5D machining.  There's a lot to be said for 3D modeling but for many the learning curve may be steeper than 2D CAD.  Once mastered, a 3D model can produce a solids file (.e.g, STL) that can then be used to generate 3D g-code.  That's one reason to select CamBam over a perhaps simpler program.

My workflow for the past 6 years or so has been to use Draftsight (free autocad clone) to transcribe paper drawings, export to DXF which then is loaded to CamBam for g-code production.  Recently I've been using Solidworks to model entire engines.  I have then used the models to create DXFs for some parts, but haven't yet machined anything from them.  Doing the modeling work on each part and then joining them in assemblies is very useful for confirming fits and dimensions.



Offline fumopuc

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Re: To the dark side CNC
« Reply #18 on: August 01, 2015, 07:49:29 PM »
Hi Stuart, I am a happy Vcarve pro user with my little proxxon mill now since 3 years. First intention was to start with Cut2D but after playing around with the tutorials at the Vectric home page I have spend the money for the more expensive package. I am using the CAM section only.
« Last Edit: August 03, 2015, 05:37:29 AM by fumopuc »
Kind Regards
Achim

Offline Stuart

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Re: To the dark side CNC
« Reply #19 on: August 01, 2015, 08:21:27 PM »
H

No good for the house I have a 150 meg internet but no PC only iMac ect. , ok I could boot camp windoze but it will upset the partition map of the fusion drive hence a no go

Hence the title the dark side being windows.

Thanks again for the the input as it is I have some software with the machine , TurboCad v8 for Mac so I will try that combo first if all that fails I will have to install a wifi booster to get a decent signal out to the WS and go with your surjestion

Thanks again for your input
Stuart
My aim is for a accurate part with a good finish

Offline Stuart

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Re: To the dark side CNC
« Reply #20 on: August 01, 2015, 08:31:04 PM »
Mike
I hate to tell you that mach3 will run on a 64 bit windows 7 with a motion controller that's how mine is running , however the PP will not run on any 64 bit only up to I believe W7 32 bit

Quote from Mach3 site note motion controller

"An appropriate external motion controller (options can be found on the Plugins page)
Desktop or Laptop with Windows 2000, Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7, or Windows 8
1Ghz CPU
512MB RAM
Video Card with 32MB RAM(Large G-code files, especially 3D files will require a video card with 512MB RAM or higher)"

It's the PP that limits it as the DLL for the PP that can only run in 32 bit OS . That's why the switch to motion controllers USB or Ethernet has had to happen because the modern PP do not output 5vdc only 3.3vdc hence they do not have the power to drive the hardware


So my system is a core duo optiplex running W7 64 bit pro and it's fine no problems now I have the correct software , this needs to be the current ver in all cases else it will not run

Stuart
« Last Edit: August 01, 2015, 08:35:34 PM by Stuart »
My aim is for a accurate part with a good finish

Offline Stuart

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Re: To the dark side CNC
« Reply #21 on: August 01, 2015, 09:15:56 PM »
Tomorrow  Jo

I will get some up for you

Stuart
My aim is for a accurate part with a good finish

Offline Vixen

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Re: To the dark side CNC
« Reply #22 on: August 01, 2015, 09:42:35 PM »
Stuart
Reading back through today's posts, I am so relieved that I do not have to start my CNC adventures with today's hardware and software.
A core duo optiplex running Win 7 64 bit pro driving Mach 3 software via an external motion controller. That is an impressive set-up.

I have an old 486 machine running Win 95 in DOS mode. DOS is a real time OS, whereas Windoz is not, therefore it needs the external motion control hardware. My control software is DeskNC which runs in DOS. I have used this stuff every day for the last twenty years, it may be old fashioned but it does exactly the same job as the expensive modern stuff. no more, no less. It does it without fuss and is totally reliable. Finding old PC's will one day become a problem for me, and then I will have to modernise. But until then.........

Mike
It is the journey that matters, not the destination

Offline Don1966

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Re: To the dark side CNC
« Reply #23 on: August 02, 2015, 02:24:01 AM »
It's the PP that limits it as the DLL for the PP that can only run in 32 bit OS . That's why the switch to motion controllers USB or Ethernet has had to happen because the modern PP do not output 5vdc only 3.3vdc hence they do not have the power to drive the hardware


So my system is a core duo optiplex running W7 64 bit pro and it's fine no problems now I have the correct software , this needs to be the current ver in all cases else it will not run

Stuart
Hi Stuart there are converters to handle handshaking.............http://www.epapersign.com/lpt2usb0/lpt2usb-features-and-functionality?gclid=CNLayMGdiccCFYI7aQodix8ChA

Don

Offline Floating around

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Re: To the dark side CNC
« Reply #24 on: August 02, 2015, 07:44:30 AM »
Hi Stuart,

Thanks for the clarification. I have always run 2 computers, one slow/old dedicated windows box for the cnc machine and the other a faster more modern one at a nice comfortable desk for design and cam, (seem to spend a LOT of time there!) transfering the G code file between the 2 with a usb stick.
Trying not to go banging on about fusion 360... But it also runs happly on a Mac in OS10. I'm curently using it on a 4 year old macbook pro but with the latest version of OS10.

What motion controler are you using?

H

Offline Stuart

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Re: To the dark side CNC
« Reply #25 on: August 02, 2015, 07:57:14 AM »
H

Now you have me interested runs on a Mac OS X 10.  I will try it out on OS X 10.11 B5 note I am under NDA on that system so there will be no detail except for it run or not


Thanks for the info I did not look hard enough

It will solve a problem no need to be in the WS in the evenings and can sit comfy at my desk

Stuart
My aim is for a accurate part with a good finish

Offline Stuart

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Re: To the dark side CNC
« Reply #26 on: August 02, 2015, 11:39:19 AM »
Here are a couple of pic

at the left is the pipes fore the one shot lube system
note the rt is a 100 mm one




engine room

note the holes are the ser. no.  I have blanked it because you can use it to reg on the support rite

The WS is a mess please excuse a new toy comes in and they make a mess

if you look the front of the thing is over the bench but a heavy steel angle is to be bolted on to provide support although the thing is very rear end heavy weight wise its 80 Kg

Stuart
« Last Edit: August 02, 2015, 11:43:11 AM by Stuart »
My aim is for a accurate part with a good finish

Offline jadge

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Re: To the dark side CNC
« Reply #27 on: August 02, 2015, 10:00:14 PM »
Stuart: Welcome to the world of 21st century machining.  :stir:

I've been running a 4-axis CNC mill for the last eight years, and it opens up a whole new world. It allows you to design parts in a completely different way, but it requires a slightly different mindset. I tend to run 6mm and 10mm cutters as standard and I run at much higher spindle speeds and feeds than I would, or could, run on the Bridgeport. In HE30 I'd run a 10mm cutter at 3000rpm and 900mm/min feedrate. I can't turn the handles on the Bridgeport that fast.

I would disagree with some of the previous posters in some cases. Personally I'd go straight for 3D CAD. I find it much easier to use than 2D (essentially an electronic drawing board) and it allows you to build assemblies to make sure all the parts fit together properly. Speeds and feeds are the biggest problem. I wouldn't be too cautious, the tool needs to cut not rub, so make sure the chip load is sensible. I agree that climb milling gives the best finish (at least on some materials) and I tend to make the finish pass climb milling, but otherwise I don't worry about climb or conventional milling. I normally use a combination of both to get the machining done in the shortest time.

I use 3D models in my CAM software, even for 2D machining. I also use backplotting software (NCPlot) that plots a toolpath from the actual G-code that has been generated. Rarely my CAM program doesn't generate G-code that matches the toolpath it thinks it is using. I used to air cut first, but don't normally bother now.

Here's the first part I made on my CNC mill, it wouldn't have been easy on manual machines:



For the curious the part is an end cover for custom common mode and differential chokes wound on iron powder cores. The chokes were carrying 50A at 600V, so the wire was heavy gauge with thick insulation. The end covers prevented the wire from being cut by the cores, and the curved radial grooves helped to uniformly space each turn.

Andrew
« Last Edit: August 21, 2017, 10:39:02 PM by jadge »

Offline Stuart

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Re: To the dark side CNC
« Reply #28 on: August 03, 2015, 07:08:58 AM »
Thanks for the reply Andrew

I wil have to digest all the information given by you and others , but by ekk it's going to take some chewing

Yes it's a new mindset with far more fixtures and pockets to hold the parts I want to make

i do know that first cut into metal is going to be a bit twitchy


Stuart
My aim is for a accurate part with a good finish

Offline Stuart

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Re: To the dark side CNC
« Reply #29 on: August 03, 2015, 10:49:33 AM »
Back to the soft limits these sit just inside the limit switches and also define the workable area .

They are set by homing the machine , change to work DRO zero these an drive each axis to the limit switch note down the numbers

Then go to the soft limits page and set them to just short of your note figures .

In use the software shows the work area as a dotted line then you can make sure that the job will fit , and second it slows down when approaching the defined area limit.

This give you belt and braces safety .

But a big note make sure you reboot mach3 if you change any soft limit as it needs to start up with valid data.

Others may not use them but I am new to this so any hand holding will be useful

So as of now the machine is in position bench support fitted to the front PC do da put on a shelf and the monitor thingy on a wall bracket

Have I said I hate windoze with a passion but it look with help of Floating Around I have found a CAD CAM package that runs on a Mac as well as the other one and he has explained how to get it for free if you are an enthusiast/hobbyist  legally
Their is no ser numbers only hour log on as the home equipment has a very fast connection it will be fine , one package to do both jobs , and it has a post processor for Mach3

Stuart
My aim is for a accurate part with a good finish