Author Topic: Gothic Beam Steam Engine Build  (Read 26167 times)

Offline maury

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Gothic Beam Steam Engine Build
« on: May 30, 2015, 10:13:47 PM »
It's been a few weeks since I've returned from CF & NAMES, and thingh are setteling down
a bit. So I get some shop time.This week end I started cutting iron on the Gothic Beam Steam
Engine. I have never built a beam engine before, so this should be really exciting.

The background on this engine is onterestoing, so here are a few tid bits. THe engine was
built by Novelty Iron in New York City in about 1851. The engine was used to power a lead
smelting plant in Philladelphia. Currently the engine is in the Henry Ford Museum.

When I was in Detroit between the engine shows I visited the Henry Ford Museum, and saw the
Gothic Beam Engine.It's quite an imposing sight, and the architecture is a magnificent work
of art.

So, enough chit chat, here is the start of a new project.

The first pict shows the engine partially built by an unknown builder.

I started working on the base, so the second pict shows the base castings.

The rest are picts of machining the top, bottom and face of the castings. I set up for
cutting the bottom edge first, the setup focusing on getting the pattern on the face
centered vertically. After those cuts I set up for cleaning up the faces of the 4 castings.
Last, I did another setup for cutting the top to the correct height. Also, the notch for
the top plate was cut in this same setup.

maury.
"The trouble with socialism is that you eventually run out of other people's money."... Margaret Thatcher

Offline sshire

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Re: Gothic Beam Steam Engine Build
« Reply #1 on: May 30, 2015, 10:47:01 PM »
I also saw the "real" engine at The Henry Ford. Absolutely beautiful. And big.
I'll be following this one , Maury.
Best,
Stan

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Gothic Beam Steam Engine Build
« Reply #2 on: May 31, 2015, 01:21:45 AM »
Hi Maury

Good to see you working on a new project; I was thinking about you to day and hoping that you were keeping your feet dry and not out filling sand bags.

Looks like you are off to a great start; how about a picture of the original engine at the Ford Museum.

Dave

Offline kvom

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Re: Gothic Beam Steam Engine Build
« Reply #3 on: May 31, 2015, 12:32:52 PM »


Offline maury

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Re: Gothic Beam Steam Engine Build
« Reply #4 on: May 31, 2015, 01:05:06 PM »
Stan, it was good meeting you and the MEM guys at York, hope to do it again. Thanks for tuning in

Dave, I kind of botched photographing the Gothic at Henry Ford. I never got a shot of the whole engine, even though it would have been difficult had I tried. I did get some detail shots though. I'll include some here.

KVOM, thanks for the pict of the whole engine. I wonder if you could email me a full res copy of that sometime.

maury
"The trouble with socialism is that you eventually run out of other people's money."... Margaret Thatcher

Offline Jasonb

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Re: Gothic Beam Steam Engine Build
« Reply #5 on: May 31, 2015, 01:16:12 PM »
looks an interesting subject Maury, I'll be following along. I see that it does not have the commonly used Watt linkage and instead uses a cross head and guides to keep the piston rod vertical.

J

Offline gbritnell

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Re: Gothic Beam Steam Engine Build
« Reply #6 on: May 31, 2015, 01:19:30 PM »
Hi Maury,
It's good to see you back in the shop again. I had a good time at York and enjoyed our meeting. I have been to the Ford Museum a number of times and not only is the Gothic Beam imposing but quite a few of the others on display. I'll be following along on your build.
gbritnell
Talent unshared is talent wasted.

Offline kvom

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Re: Gothic Beam Steam Engine Build
« Reply #7 on: May 31, 2015, 04:40:36 PM »
I just found that photo on Google.  Not mine.

Offline maury

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Re: Gothic Beam Steam Engine Build
« Reply #8 on: June 01, 2015, 02:05:31 AM »
Guys, thanks for tuning in. This is going to be a fun ride. I spent most of the day at the Bridgeport again today, making groves and slots. There is a lot more cutting to these parts then I thought. I might mention I am very happy with the performance of my Bridgeport since rebuilding it this past winter.

More  on the base castings. One thing I did was to modify the geometry a bit. I guess have to admit I've never actually built a kit exactly per the print. The thing is, the print shows the ends being held on by countersunk SHMS. This just goes against everything that I believe in about how period engines should be built. I airainged things so the screws can attach internally, and will be invisible. I want to have the external machined surfaces polished instead of being painted, so I can't fill the countersinks.

The Pics.

maury
"The trouble with socialism is that you eventually run out of other people's money."... Margaret Thatcher

Offline Steamer5

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Re: Gothic Beam Steam Engine Build
« Reply #9 on: June 01, 2015, 08:24:44 AM »
Hi Maury,
 Another master class coming up!  :popcorn: stocked up on.

Like you idea on hidden fixing, will be much better than having the heads showing

Cheers
Kerrin

Get excited and make something!

Offline smfr

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Re: Gothic Beam Steam Engine Build
« Reply #10 on: June 01, 2015, 05:07:04 PM »
That's a good start, Maury, and I like your approach to hide the fasteners. Will be following along!

Simon

Offline tvoght

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Re: Gothic Beam Steam Engine Build
« Reply #11 on: June 01, 2015, 07:13:55 PM »
I'm here for the duration.

--Tim

Offline Don1966

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Re: Gothic Beam Steam Engine Build
« Reply #12 on: June 02, 2015, 12:01:42 AM »
I'll be pulling up a chair also Maury........... :DrinkPint:


 :popcorn:

Don

Offline derekwarner

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Re: Gothic Beam Steam Engine Build
« Reply #13 on: June 02, 2015, 12:43:32 AM »
I shall be watching too Maury...........contrary to opinion offered, Gothic design does have a place in modern engineering


Just digressing a little.......we used the neo-classical tear drop design as an element of strength in a forged clevis/piston rod over conventional screwed rod & clevis

The hydraulic cylinder is 360 bore x 160 rod........when the original rod sheared at the clevis interface, it caused a lost profit of just over $1,000,000 [26 hour delay] in the Hot Strip Mill of Australia's largest steel producer

FEA confirmed this one piece forging had a fatigue rating of x13 over the theoretical value conventional screwed rod clevis....[which was never attainable]....

My name is in the title block of this Drawing...................Derek
« Last Edit: June 02, 2015, 12:51:26 AM by derekwarner_decoy »
Derek Warner - Honorary Secretary [Retired]
Illawarra Live Steamers Co-op - Australia
www.ils.org.au

Offline maury

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Re: Gothic Beam Steam Engine Build
« Reply #14 on: June 03, 2015, 06:21:24 PM »
Guys, thanks for the responses and comments

So, another day in the shop. Today I finished up the screw holes to assemble
the 4 base plates. To my amaizement they actually fit nicely and the base is
square. So on to the top plate where everything is mounted. I changed the
plans a bit again, I used 1/8 steel instead of 3/16 called out in the plans.
The castings have columns internal to the base, and the pedistals would be
almost completely removed using a 3/16 plate for the top plate. 1/8 gives a lot better
look. The pics show the setup for drilling the holes in the ends of the front
and back plates, the setup for the top plate and cutting it square and adding
the cutout for the crank.

maury
"The trouble with socialism is that you eventually run out of other people's money."... Margaret Thatcher