Author Topic: Dickie a Crew works Shunting Loco  (Read 11951 times)

Offline mike mott

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Dickie a Crew works Shunting Loco
« on: April 19, 2015, 03:53:02 AM »
A few years ago I began building a model of the Crew Works Shunting Locomotive call Dickie. This engine was designed by F W Webb in 1876 the year an article in the journal "Engineering" on the 1st September described Dickie and the earlier engine called Billy
the engines were described here http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/e5/Engineering_22%2C_July-Dec_1876_-_Part_2.djvu/page48-1280px-Engineering_22%2C_July-Dec_1876_-_Part_2.djvu.jpg

http://www.gracesguide.co.uk/images/2/25/Im1876ev22-p178.jpg

First I made a plastic model



Then sorted out the splined shaft for the shifting of the valves for forward and reverse I took some steel pinion that i had in the scrap box and cut off every second tooth and then while it was clamped in the 3 jaw chuck on the Myford and also held in the drill chuck in the tailstock, I then used a propane torch to heat up the centre section when it was red hot I rotated the chuck by hand to create the spiral. 














I posted some of the progress about this engine a few years ago on a different website, I have now decided to get back to working on this model again  as well as the tiny IC engine.

I will show the development to the current state of this model in the coming posts, I will need to scratch my head a bit to remember some of the work I have uploaded a lot of pictures now to my Photobucket site so it will be easy to build the log.

Mike


If you can imagine it you can build it

Offline Roger B

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Re: Dickie a Crew works Shunting Loco
« Reply #1 on: April 19, 2015, 07:44:31 AM »
That looks to be an interesting project and a good solution to the first challenge  :ThumbsUp:  :ThumbsUp: I will be following along  :popcorn:  :wine1:
Best regards

Roger

Offline mike mott

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Re: Dickie a Crew works Shunting Loco
« Reply #2 on: April 19, 2015, 02:54:08 PM »
Roger thanks for having a look.
Making the Gears was a challenge because I did not want to set up the big rotary table which would mean also setting up a chuck on it so after machining the aluminum to the correct diameter I mounted a 30 tooth Myford change wheel to the end as a guide. mounted the lot between a new set of "V" blocks, I had the right cutter fortunately so this was used to cut the gear.



I am using the gear that is clamped to the end of the Aluminum rod. I indexed it by hand, un-clamping the shaft then using the gear cutter by moving the table and slowly slotting the cutter into the gear tipping it up and down until there is no movement rotating the gear then re clamping the gear and aluminum then making the next cuts, which are approx .090. tricky but it seems to be working.

This was the simplest way I could cut the gear blank, the thing is it works.......





While studying the Webb drawings in the Crew book I realized that the sliding gear only had to rotate the spline through 90 degrees, because the wheels are quartered.







Mike
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Online b.lindsey

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Re: Dickie a Crew works Shunting Loco
« Reply #3 on: April 20, 2015, 12:57:12 AM »
Interesting project Mike. I am curious as to how you cut the internal helical spline teeth in the brass bushing that fits through the gear.

Bill

Offline mike mott

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Re: Dickie a Crew works Shunting Loco
« Reply #4 on: April 20, 2015, 01:14:19 AM »
Bill the answer is that I didn't in these pictures







the ends if the brass screws are the shape of the gear tooth and since the torque on the gear is quite low I am confident that it will work well.

Next the cylinders were fabricated from bar stock.









In the next installment I will show how I did the wheel bearings.

Mike
« Last Edit: April 20, 2015, 01:21:13 AM by mike mott »
If you can imagine it you can build it

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Dickie a Crew works Shunting Loco
« Reply #5 on: April 20, 2015, 01:25:48 AM »
Hi Mike

Another interesting project; I had the same question as Bill, and earlier today I had seen the picture with the bolts in the bushing and never really gave any thought that they were driving the bushing along the splines.

I'm not a steam guy but I am looking forward to seeing more of this project.

Very nice work so far.

Dave

Online b.lindsey

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Re: Dickie a Crew works Shunting Loco
« Reply #6 on: April 20, 2015, 01:38:54 AM »
It makes sense now Mike. Like Dave, I saw the bolts in the picture earlier but didn't make the connection. Thanks for clarifying.

Bill


Offline joe d

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Re: Dickie a Crew works Shunting Loco
« Reply #7 on: April 20, 2015, 04:10:49 AM »
Mike

Like the looks of this already!  I'll be following along  :popcorn:

Joe

Offline mike mott

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Re: Dickie a Crew works Shunting Loco
« Reply #8 on: April 20, 2015, 06:26:45 AM »
Hi Dave,  Joe,   Bill thanks for following along, and the kind remarks.

At the moment this is moving along fairly quickly because I have already done a lot of this work.

The wheel bearing changed from straight circular bushings to something more complex.

First a simple quartering jig I used a couple of quick squares, and set the wheels with loctite.



I wanted to be able to take the wheels out of the bearing for future maintenance and it is better practice to be more prototypical in my view.









The slotted bearings worked better.



Next up was to machine up the connecting rods, a good friend who drives a 7.5 inch steam loco suggested using aluminum for the rods so I followed his advice. and set up a simple jig to do the milling.



Mike
If you can imagine it you can build it

Offline sbwhart

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Re: Dickie a Crew works Shunting Loco
« Reply #9 on: April 20, 2015, 07:34:01 AM »
Hi Mike

Being born and bred in Crewe I know of these trams engines they were used to transport goods around the Crewe Loco works the engine you are modelling was one of Webs later engines the earlier engines were designed by Ramsbottom, I have a book on these engines I'll post you the detail of the book later. One of Ramsbottoms engine is preserved at the York railway Museum, I took some pictures of it a few years ago, sorry there isn't a full picture but I was after pictures of detail as I was contemplating modelling it.





I'll get back to you later with book details

Stew
A little bit of clearance never got in the way

Offline mike mott

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Re: Dickie a Crew works Shunting Loco
« Reply #10 on: April 20, 2015, 02:27:54 PM »
Good morning Stew, thanks for posting the picture and drawing of Pet. I also have the book that you speak of, if it is the one I am thinking of. I have a lot of pictures of Pet because it is my other favourite engine, and I have been developing my own drawings for it as well as the ones for the Webb engine. my main drawings are in Autocad Lt the one I have posted is in Corel Draw 11

Marine IC engines are new to me and the tiny buffalo one I am working on is for a boat model.  I am a steam guy from way back. I have a few different locos part built, but that is another story.

here are a couple of pictures of my tiny pet in brass.









I have all sorts of pictures of the undercarriage and linkage and cylinders as well.

Back to Dickie and the rods, I used the rotary table to finish off the ends.








Mike
« Last Edit: April 20, 2015, 02:42:28 PM by mike mott »
If you can imagine it you can build it

Offline mike mott

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Re: Dickie a Crew works Shunting Loco
« Reply #11 on: April 21, 2015, 06:19:28 AM »
Today I had a one of those moments that makes the pit of your stomach knot up tight. while filing some 1/4 inch thick aluminum that is going to be used for the outside shell the boiler rolled off the loco and  hit the floor.

It all began after spending two hours cutting out the plates with a jewelers saw, no I did not break any blades.





these plates are meant to fit over this boiler like this first one



the second plat was just a little tight so I set it up in the vice and filed the inside a little at a time and kept testing it to be a nice slide fit over the boiler, then it happened!



both ends were damaged



I felt gutted.  the firebox end was the worst because both the outer and inner tubes were deformed. After taking it apart I turned up some Thornton bearing stock that I just happened to have into a shallow cone in order to tap it into the small tube to see if I could reform it without too much trouble.



After a few goes the tapered plug managed to reshape the bore the flange flattened out pretty easily the squashed holes on the perimeter were a different challenge.



I ground down a scriber to work the alignment little by little and managed to get the bolts back through the holes.





That is about it for today.

Mike 
If you can imagine it you can build it

Offline Roger B

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Re: Dickie a Crew works Shunting Loco
« Reply #12 on: April 21, 2015, 07:21:03 AM »
That's a good save  :ThumbsUp:  :ThumbsUp: Still following along  :wine1:
Best regards

Roger

Offline Steamer5

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Re: Dickie a Crew works Shunting Loco
« Reply #13 on: April 21, 2015, 11:03:29 AM »
Hi Mike,
 Real nice save!! :ThumbsUp:

Sitting back,  :popcorn: :DrinkPint: in hand waiting for the next update!!

Cheers Kerrin
Get excited and make something!

Offline wagnmkr

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Re: Dickie a Crew works Shunting Loco
« Reply #14 on: April 21, 2015, 11:13:56 AM »
Good Job on repairing the damage.

This is a very interesting engine and build. Love the reversing mechanism.

Tom
I was cut out to be rich ... but ... I was sown up all wrong!

Offline mike mott

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Re: Dickie a Crew works Shunting Loco
« Reply #15 on: April 21, 2015, 02:50:34 PM »
Roger, Kerrin, Tom, thanks it was a bit tense to say the least, now back to the progression to get to the present state.

After the cylinders were mostly fabricated the cross slide guide is a wide flat plate that is bolted to the frames the original is a casting from the look of it on the drawings in the crew book but I fabricated it from some flat stock. the cross slide is a piece of brass bar.







The footplate is cut from a sheet of 1/4 inch thick flat aluminum sheet. The edge was milled to give the illusion that the top part of the plate is only 1/16th thick. 







and the support plates for the boiler were done so that the inner support plates would create a simple cradle with a top part that slipped over the boiler tube like a u clamp with four bolts up through the bottom. it was while making these clamps that the boiler rolled off yesterday.



because the boiler will have cross tubes I wanted to be able to clean and do maintenance on the boiler so chose to fabricate it in a similar way to the original by bolting it all together in a bit of a hybrid way, but it seems to be working out.



I made the fire bars from some old BBQ grill I found at the dump after leaving them in the bonfire to clean off any organic material I broke them up and machined the parts into some nice flat cast iron bars.







So this is where things are now A partially finished boiler, frames and cylinders. but I am glad that I have taken it down from the shelf to get back working on it. So I can now alternate between a big and small engines, one steam and one I.C.

Mike

 
If you can imagine it you can build it

Offline AOG

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Re: Dickie a Crew works Shunting Loco
« Reply #16 on: April 21, 2015, 04:24:57 PM »
I have a question. If you bolt it together like that how will you make it steam tight?

Tony

Offline mike mott

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Re: Dickie a Crew works Shunting Loco
« Reply #17 on: April 21, 2015, 05:13:00 PM »
Hi Tony, when i have all the surfaces mated properly I will use a high temp silicone as a gasget, this will be a low pressure boiler not a high pressure one.

Mike
If you can imagine it you can build it

Offline sbwhart

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Re: Dickie a Crew works Shunting Loco
« Reply #18 on: April 21, 2015, 05:54:15 PM »
Nice fix with the damage Mike.  :ThumbsUp:

You're doing some great work.

 :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp:

And I really like your Pet Model what gauge is it?.

Stew
A little bit of clearance never got in the way

Offline AOG

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Re: Dickie a Crew works Shunting Loco
« Reply #19 on: April 21, 2015, 05:56:59 PM »
Will that work for sealing the fire tube? I thought that stuff was only good up to about 200C.

Thanks

Tony

Offline mike mott

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Re: Dickie a Crew works Shunting Loco
« Reply #20 on: April 21, 2015, 06:05:47 PM »
Stew, thanks for your  kind remarks the gauge on the little pet is 16.5mm

Tony, the way that the boiler is set up I plan to ensure that there is no contact with flame on the gasket materials at the smokebox end. this will still need a bit of work to sort out completely, but I am working on it.

Mike
If you can imagine it you can build it

Offline mike mott

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Re: Dickie a Crew works Shunting Loco
« Reply #21 on: April 23, 2015, 05:28:20 AM »
The fall of the boiler actually did a fair bit of damage that was not fully apparent at first, I spent most of the day working at getting the surfaces flat again, a lot of elbow grease with files and sanding sticks and plates. The first picture shows just how much the plate has been bumped out of flatness, fortunately copper is soft after the silver soldering so it is not too difficult to get it flat it just takes time.



getting there



The big tube was not as difficult at one end more work at the other end.





The most difficult part to get flat and smooth was the inside of the plate that is silver soldered to the firebox tube at the firebox end it was this end of the boiler that sustained the most deformation.





The smokebox end had the least deformation but is the end that has to mate with both the inner and outer tubes



I have begun finishing the bolts to hold the tubes and plates together these are 2x56 allen head cap screws with brass nuts that I am making from hex stock, all the screw are 11/32" which means cutting down longer ones, tedious work for sure. the plates mate very well so I am confident that the high temp silicone will work. The boiler pressure will be 50 psi max for this model, it is not an express but a small works engine.



It is easier to cut down the 1/2 inch long screws than the 3/8th ones so that is the progress to date.

Mike
If you can imagine it you can build it

Offline peatoluser

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Re: Dickie a Crew works Shunting Loco
« Reply #22 on: April 23, 2015, 09:17:26 AM »
I'm glad your repair worked. very impressive indeed.
with all those bolts , it really does look like a scale replica rather than a model facsimile.
How are you cutting the bolts down to size? like making studs, it's one of those jobs I find a chore so am always looking for easy ways of doing it.

yours

peter

Offline mike mott

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Re: Dickie a Crew works Shunting Loco
« Reply #23 on: April 23, 2015, 02:41:11 PM »
Hi Peter thanks , the way I am shortening the bolts is simple but slow. the hex is cut to the length I need and the bolt is slipped in with about a 1/16 inch of thread at the cutting end so I don't have to thread it all the way once it is cut off the a quick lick of a very fine fine.

If you can imagine it you can build it

Offline peatoluser

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Re: Dickie a Crew works Shunting Loco
« Reply #24 on: April 23, 2015, 05:34:29 PM »
thanks for the reply and photos. I like the idea and shall file away for later use

cheers

peter

Offline mike mott

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Re: Dickie a Crew works Shunting Loco
« Reply #25 on: April 23, 2015, 09:01:14 PM »
Finished the bolts at the firebox end, after they were all installed I gave then a final leveling on the flat sheet using the traditional figure eight motion. Now to finish making the next sets at the smokebox end. when I take it all apart again I will put a slight rounding on the outer face of the nuts to dress them up a bit.

Mike

If you can imagine it you can build it

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Dickie a Crew works Shunting Loco
« Reply #26 on: April 24, 2015, 01:07:09 AM »
Wow that's a lot of nuts and bolts; it sure looks nice Mike!

I'm glad you were able to salvage the boiler; I'll bet your heart just sank when it dove for the floor. :wallbang:

Dave

Offline Bearcar1

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Re: Dickie a Crew works Shunting Loco
« Reply #27 on: April 25, 2015, 02:32:29 AM »
Mike, I love  :Love:  seeing the WIP, I am wondering where you acquired the drawings for such a charming project. Being a 'plans collector' of sorts, I would be very interested in obtaining a set of the drawings…..


BC1
Jim

Offline mike mott

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Re: Dickie a Crew works Shunting Loco
« Reply #28 on: April 25, 2015, 04:08:32 AM »
Dave, yes the sound of copper colliding with concrete was definitely sickening my first words were  :censored:

Jim I am using the works drawing that is published in the "Crew Works Narrow Gauge System" by Edward Talbot and Clive Taylor. second edition 2005 ISBN 0-9546951-1-1-9 to create my own plans for the model after supper I will upload a PDF of what I have draw so far.

Mike
If you can imagine it you can build it

Offline mike mott

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Re: Dickie a Crew works Shunting Loco
« Reply #29 on: April 25, 2015, 04:45:32 AM »
Hi Jim this is a PDF of the work in progress of the drawings I am developing for the 18 inch gauge loco of Dickie, The completed drawings will end up as a suit of drawings of all the parts and a general arrangement when I have finished them

These are by no means final, the actual drawings are in Autocad LT 2000, as I am building parts i am going back and adjusting the drawings to reflect the as built condition. The scale is a little odd because I am using 2 1/2 inches to represent 18 inches it comes out to 1:7.2, but of course the beauty of Cad is that once the data base is drawn the scale can be manipulated to be whatever one wants.

anyway here is the PDF

Mike
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Offline mike mott

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Re: Dickie a Crew works Shunting Loco
« Reply #30 on: April 26, 2015, 12:46:16 AM »
Managed to complete the bolts on the smokebox end. I  bent an allen wrench to create a special one to position and hold the bolts through the small ring.











Next I want to finish the bolts for the top of the steam dome then when that is done I will continue with the rest of the boiler bushings for the various fittings.

Mike
If you can imagine it you can build it

Offline peatoluser

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Re: Dickie a Crew works Shunting Loco
« Reply #31 on: April 26, 2015, 07:42:10 AM »
like the bent allen wrench.
still like looking at those bolted flanges. very professional.

peter

Offline Kim

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Re: Dickie a Crew works Shunting Loco
« Reply #32 on: April 26, 2015, 04:18:02 PM »
That is a LOT of bolts!
Kim

edit: fixed the spelling of bolts!  :-[
« Last Edit: April 26, 2015, 10:00:21 PM by krt2 »

Offline mike mott

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Re: Dickie a Crew works Shunting Loco
« Reply #33 on: April 26, 2015, 05:17:03 PM »
Peter, Kim, thanks for the comments.

Started the firebox insert late last evening and finished off the basic shaping this morning. the insert will allow me to fit the castable fire wall at the smokebox end of the firebox, and the structure for the fire bars. The way the loco looks at the firebox end is markedly different than the smokebox end, in that the large outer ring of bolts is not visible only the inner ring of the main flue tube which houses the firebox. To get a perfectly telescoping tube as the starting point I cut a length of the same diameter tube as the flue tube, and did the math for the inner and outer diameters of the tube in order for the piece to slide in I had to remove a section that was .472" along the length. I did that with the metal cut off saw, then annealed it and used a file for the final clean up the the correct slot width. just squeezing it shut with hand pressure until it fit snug.
Next I used a pipe clamp to hold it while I removed the unwanted section. The cross cut was again done with the cut off saw then the lengthwise cuts were done with the jewelers saw. 





A final clean up with an assortment of files



Ready to do the next steps which include soldering the flange ring and adding the grate and firewall.





Now for some domestic work, to keep the authorities happy.

Mike


If you can imagine it you can build it

Offline mike mott

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Re: Dickie a Crew works Shunting Loco
« Reply #34 on: April 27, 2015, 02:53:28 PM »
Continuing with the firebox plate, first I cut some 11 gauge copper sheet and  cut an 11 thou groove to register it to the tube part, then set it up in my square grinding vice that I made as an apprentice back in 1964.





This vice is great for laying out because I can just flip it and the work is square.



today I will drill the holes and fret out the firebox door and ash clean out holes, and silver solder it together.

Mike
If you can imagine it you can build it

Offline peatoluser

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Re: Dickie a Crew works Shunting Loco
« Reply #35 on: April 27, 2015, 03:21:57 PM »
At some point in the near future I have couple of condenser flanges to mark out and drill, and I was wondering how best to go about marking them out...and then I read your latest up date...and I have  one of those  vices... just never thought about using it like that!
once again, thanks for posting

peter

Offline joe d

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Re: Dickie a Crew works Shunting Loco
« Reply #36 on: April 27, 2015, 03:43:50 PM »
Mike

Still following along, this is just getting better and better.  Looking forward to more!

Joe

Offline Roger B

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Re: Dickie a Crew works Shunting Loco
« Reply #37 on: April 27, 2015, 07:33:32 PM »
Still following along and enjoying  :ThumbsUp:  :ThumbsUp:  :wine1:
Best regards

Roger

Offline mike mott

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Re: Dickie a Crew works Shunting Loco
« Reply #38 on: April 28, 2015, 06:12:19 AM »
Peter, Joe, Roger thanks for your kind remarks.

Used the rotary table to drill the holes.



Next the flange plate was silver soldered to the inner tray.



Need to make another 30 nuts and bolts.



Cut out the end plate, At first I was looking for a piece of copper sheet the right thickness and then realized that it did not need to be copper, so cut it out of a sheet of brass.



Mike
If you can imagine it you can build it

Online Dan Rowe

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Re: Dickie a Crew works Shunting Loco
« Reply #39 on: April 28, 2015, 01:57:56 PM »
Wow Mike, that sure is a lot of bolts and that really makes it look good. That is some nice progress on this build.

Dan
ShaylocoDan

Offline wagnmkr

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Re: Dickie a Crew works Shunting Loco
« Reply #40 on: April 28, 2015, 02:18:59 PM »
Another excellent project to watch. I have pulled up a chair.

Tom
I was cut out to be rich ... but ... I was sown up all wrong!

Online b.lindsey

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Re: Dickie a Crew works Shunting Loco
« Reply #41 on: April 28, 2015, 04:05:19 PM »
I have to agree with Tom, this has been fun to watch and your progress is amazing. You must be seeing nuts and bolts in your sleep now though... :lolb:

Bill

Offline mike mott

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Re: Dickie a Crew works Shunting Loco
« Reply #42 on: April 29, 2015, 07:48:16 AM »
Thanks for following along .

It was a long day, first laying out and drilling the regulator bushing holes, the tricky part is that they needed to be matched at each end.  Had i had my wits about me when I drilled the flanges and plates for the bolt holes, instead of ganging them all together they were done piecemeal. I could have registered it all as the flanges were soldered.

Be that as it may, thing are now taking longer.

the firebox end regulator bushing is longer so that it protrudes just enough to meet the outside surface. the flange on the brass will be bolted and will act as a stuffing box to block steam. There will be a slightly different set up at the smokebox end both handles are connected to the long shaft, there will be a lever fitted in the area of the steam dome to open and close the valve at the top of the dome collector pipe.

I also had to clean up the steam dome inside where the boiler tube and the steam dome intersect in order to not foul the regulator shaft. It would have so much easier to shape before soldering into the boiler tube.

I had trouble getting enough heat with the propane torch so switched to the air acetylene one but ended up grabbing the propane one as well it was when soldering the flange at the smokebox end when the plate was fixed to the boiler. After it cooled down I cleaned it took it off the boiler and reheated just the plate and flange , much easier without all that heat sink.

The other end I worked with the flue tube plate without the boiler connected straight away, it worked right away.

Mike

 
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Offline Johnb

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Re: Dickie a Crew works Shunting Loco
« Reply #43 on: April 30, 2015, 09:14:01 PM »
Very interesting. Thanks for all the pics. Makes a lot more sense.
John Browning. Member of Ickenham and District SME

Offline mike mott

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Re: Dickie a Crew works Shunting Loco
« Reply #44 on: May 02, 2015, 05:52:01 AM »
Today i fitted the cross tubes in the flue there are 8 tubes slanted at 30 degrees four left and four right. the drilling was a bit of a Heath Robinson type set up with wood clamps as well as the milling vice.



the tubes were soldered in two session so that I worked on the the left and then the right sides with the flue turned so that the tubes were on the top to help with the flow of the solder.



Another eccentric looking clamp job to drill out for the exhausts ports to the blast nozzle the port goes right through the boiler and so I needed to ensure that the holes were lined up properly. I drilled it with a lot of small incremental size increases up to 3/8"



The opposite end was more to prevent any wobbling. All of the drill bits were honed on the front face of the cutting edge with a micro flat to prevent the copper from getting snatched by the drill.

The brass back plate was also drilled out for the two valves pipes with bushes soldered to the copper and extending out to the surface of the back plate. The works drawing is very poor in this area and there are no photographs that I know of of the firebox end of the loco. I suspect that the large flange was riveted and the flue was bolted on the outside, I think i will need to open up the hole in the brass plate and slide the brass plate up to the flange from the other side. I am at a loss as to how they accomplished tightening blind bolts on the original. The flue was evidently extracted from the firebox end. The way I have constructed it, it will work, because I have changed the boiler so that I can slide out the firebox. Overall it will look like the real loco when it is all assembled. 



The last shot shows the bushing in the flue. the distance between the two tubes at the bottom is .180" the bushing surface between the two tubes is 1/2 inch in diameter with a 5/16 hole through them both. The outer tube bushing and the inner tube bushing are not quite touching and there is a small bevel on each bushing so that when it is assembled an O ring fits between and as the flange plate is pulled to line up the two tubes the O ring gets squeezed and when the 5/16 exhaust nipple is inserted and locked with a nut on the inside and outside the O ring will be squeezed just a bit more providing a good seal. (that is the plan and I'm sticking to it)



The next bushes will be for the sight glass which is at the smokebox end and the odd thing is that the smokebox end was not used and the throttle lever was removed early in the working life. also the feedwater pipe from the pump at the right rear side from the drivers position. running off a connecting rod from the wheels. The water tanks were connected via a pipe running under the axles with the connection to the bottom of the boiler at the smokebox end.
The odd thing about this engine is that there does not seem to be a place for carrying coal on the loco so I am assuming it was carried on one of the flat wagons behind the driver, unlike the other locos at the crew works which had a hopper above the water tank.  Some of the plumbing for the steam and sight glass, pressure gauge, feed to the cylinders is still a bit of a mystery.  It certainly would have been easier to have embarked on building one of the Ramsbottom engines first because I have far more detailed information about them. 

Mike

     
If you can imagine it you can build it