Author Topic: new acquisition  (Read 9644 times)

Offline ziggar

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new acquisition
« on: August 05, 2012, 09:21:03 PM »

went out to day to deliver something as promised and returned with a [new to me] myford ml10.............. :embarassed:

dont really know anything about them but i think i got a deal

has a 3 jaw chuck, dog clutch ??, tumbler reverser ???, longer topslide, indexable toolpost filled with indexable tools, big tailstock thingy with extra levers and stuff, powerdrive on the topslide, big 'ol metal stand/bench, and some change wheels and some little extras

so whatchya reckon ??

did i do good?

not wired up yet, just placed in the shed for now after having a bit of a clean up






Offline joegib

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Re: new acquisition
« Reply #1 on: August 06, 2012, 05:34:41 PM »
Looks like you've picked up a much-loved machine there. The previous owner seems to have applied every enhancement he could think of to the basic machine. The non-standard items are the:

Tumbler reverse ? I think your's is the Dave Noble version.

Leadscrew dog clutch ? I've got one on my ML10 and I've always been a bit uncertain about it's usefulness. What would make it very useful, though, is fitting an independent leadscrew drive at the tailstock end of the lathe bed. This normally comprises a low-rev motor attached to the bed back driving a belt or gear train linked to the leadscrew handwheel. So in day-to-day usage you can leave the changegear banjo and leadscrew clutch disengaged and control all your fine feed surfacing cuts via the independent drive. That way, the only time you ever need to set up a changewheel gear train is when you specifically need screwcutting. That eliminates half the rigmarole with setting up a train and then restoring the machine for fine feeding. Anyway, that's something you might think about after you've had a chance to enjoy your machine.

Crosslide power feed ? Your's seems to be a commercial unit marketed in the 50s/60s (?). Very rare beast ? I've only ever seen one in print, never in the flesh. Nice feature.

Large apron handwheel ? This looks to be a homemade adaptation. The standard handle is a ball-ended effort that is awkward in use. Your version should provide much more confortable operation.

Capstan tailstock drive ? At least I think that's what you've got ? it's not quite shown by the photo. If so, that's another nice feature. Getting enough torque to drive a large diameter drill with the standard handwheel can definitely be troublesome.

I note your machine is the Mark 1 ML10 with plain iron bearings (newer machines came with a taper roller bearing headstock). You may see disparaging remarks on the Web about plain iron bearings being inferior but take it with a pinch of salt. Sure, you should operate the lathe within the limited range of speeds suitable for plain bearings but subject to suitable lubrication (a few drops of oil per session), your machine should be fine. Incidentally, in his blurb on the ML10 over on Lathes.uk Tony Griffiths remarks that he has had a number of plain bearing ML10 machines through his hands over the years and he's never come across one whose bearings were worn.

My own experience is that I acquired a Mark 1 plain bearing machine that performed perfectly satisfactorily for years. Then I had the opportunity to acquire a new, complete Mark 2 headstock and I couldn't resist it. Given the construction of these lathes, the changeover took minutes and I've been running the machine in its taper-roller guise for nearly 20 years. But, to be entirely honest, I've since had the niggling feeling that I've never achieved the fine finish with this that the old plain-bearing headstock effortlessly provided.

Joe   

   

Bogstandard

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Re: new acquisition
« Reply #2 on: August 06, 2012, 06:39:40 PM »
You are quite right there Joe about plain bearings and surface finish.

OK you can't get the top speeds, but I and many others have found that a correctly lubricated plain head will give far superior surface finishes.

It was the same on my old Atlas. The original Babbitt bearings gave far better finishes than when I converted it to a Timken bearing head.

John

Offline ziggar

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Re: new acquisition
« Reply #3 on: August 06, 2012, 07:21:35 PM »
Joe , Thanks for the comprehensive reply. much appreciated.

i had a little 5 minute mess about with it today and did think to myself that the finish i got on the old rustolium piece i tested it with ended up with a nicer finish than i usually got on my little Sieg C1.

i read the bit about the bearings on the Lathe website so am ready for the comments dissing me new lathe  ;D

i havent tried the cross-slide power-feed yet, still getting things set up and installed. although the lathe is now fully bolted together and down and in its resting place
not too sure about it to be honest

i was considering getting rid of the apron wheel cos all i did yesterday was smash my knuckles when trying to use it
but i might end up getting used to it in time

i can easily put up other photos if anyone needs or wants to look at something in more detail




Offline HS93

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Re: new acquisition
« Reply #4 on: August 06, 2012, 11:29:19 PM »
I am about to change to a bigger apron hand wheel as my wrists are very weak (Gout) , Ill  buy yours off you if you want save me adapting, and if anyone has one of the tail stock mods they dont want ill  buy it. depends wether you are in the uk

Peter
« Last Edit: August 07, 2012, 12:02:49 AM by HS93 »

Offline steamer

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Re: new acquisition
« Reply #5 on: August 06, 2012, 11:52:07 PM »
You are quite right there Joe about plain bearings and surface finish.

OK you can't get the top speeds, but I and many others have found that a correctly lubricated plain head will give far superior surface finishes.

It was the same on my old Atlas. The original Babbitt bearings gave far better finishes than when I converted it to a Timken bearing head.

John


John is quite right.....gotta love a good plain bearing spindle.....but properly adjusted!....and lubricated!

Dave
"Mister M'Andrew, don't you think steam spoils romance at sea?"
Damned ijjit!

Offline swilliams

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Re: new acquisition
« Reply #6 on: August 07, 2012, 12:46:05 AM »
I'm also a long time plain bearing user. One thing I've learnt about them is that if you want to part off without chatter you must clamp right down on the end thrust adjustment. Even as little as a thou end float can make them sing like a banshee when parting.

Steve

Offline ziggar

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Re: new acquisition
« Reply #7 on: August 08, 2012, 05:24:41 PM »
well after a bit more time playing with it i think im gonna stick with the bigger apron wheel for the time being
seems that i can actually use it without ripping my knuckles apart if im just a little bit careful :)
so, sorry Peter, ill not be swapping at this time
sorry about that

and after trying to get the power feed to work it seems theres no light at the end of that tunnel
put a plug on it and plugged it in and no joy
no light on the control box, no movement in either direction when tried
not being an electrics bod all ica n do is check the internal fuse and see if theres leccy getting to the transformer and thats it
thats the limit of my 'lectrics ;)  :zap:
no noises, no humming, burping, clicking or whirring at all.
so thats been removed until such time as i can find some way of getting it repaired

and while im here,  :help: can anyone direct me to some information on the tailstock as i cant find anything relating to it at all
been searching all week and cant find anything about it

thanks all




Offline HS93

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Re: new acquisition
« Reply #8 on: August 08, 2012, 05:34:19 PM »
No problem  have the  thread size and am going to make a folding one , it is a bigger pain with the standard handle far to small.

peter

Offline panzer4

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Re: new acquisition
« Reply #9 on: October 19, 2012, 08:23:24 PM »
Hi
I to had a ML10 from 1982 to 2010.
I made a counter shaft clutch from a bicycle hub brake, which i believe was
written up about, in i think the model engineer but can,t be sure.
It saved the motor i,m sure for it was still going strong when i sold it
Yours Tony
p.s. i believe i may have some photo,s of it if your interested

Bogstandard

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Re: new acquisition
« Reply #10 on: October 29, 2012, 09:27:20 AM »
Ziggar,

As has already been mentioned, and your question about it, the tailstock.

Your one has been modified to give a lot more force to the drill tip than would normally be available to a standard one, plus they are usually a lot faster acting.

You should count your blessings having that one fitted, as it could solve a lot of problems. But it also raises a major problem as well.

You might start to get a lot of small drill breakages because of the extra forces it can impart, and also it wouldn't really have a fine feed action.

If it was me with it, I would keep it on there, and make or buy a sensitive drilling tool to fit into the MT nose taper. Doing it that way, you should have the best of both worlds.

If you want to consider making a sensitive drill fitting, then I do have the plans of a very good public domain one that is fairly easy to make, and will post them here if you want.

John


Offline ziggar

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Re: new acquisition
« Reply #11 on: October 29, 2012, 11:50:17 PM »
Hi John, thanks for the reply
definitely interested in the plans as that's one of the things ive been looking into
and the tail stock as it is now is a joy to use when im doing a little drilling on the lathe compared to what ive used in the past
also makes using just about anything else in the tail stock easier too


Goldstar31
a faceplate and some steadies are on my wanted list :o)
do you have any more details on the books you mention, such as a title or an ISBN number?


Panzer4
would also be interested in seeing those photos you mention, thanks



Thanks all




Bogstandard

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Re: new acquisition
« Reply #12 on: October 30, 2012, 07:20:40 AM »
Here are the plans.

John

Goldstar31

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Re: new acquisition
« Reply #13 on: October 30, 2012, 10:27:07 AM »
Hi Ziggar

The Books are G.H. Thomas and are
A Model Engineers Workshop Manual from Tee Publishing  ISBN- 1-85761-000-8
Workshop Techniques again from Tee                               ISBN-1- 85761-106-3

Mine are very old. My good friend Bill Bennett edited them years ago and they may be up dated so check. The last time Bill and I nattered it was when he and my wife were celebrating theur 50 years from graduating as dental graduates at their re-union. We were hardly in a fit state to discuss  model engineering :DrinkPint: :stir:

I can say that Martin Cleeve's Screwcutting in the Lathe is by Argus 0-85242-838-3 and you might like to go for 'top' and buy Improvements and Accessories for your lathe by J A Radford again by Tee as ISBN-1-85761-105-5. This is primarily written for the Super 7 but the 'words and the music' are first class background reading  to your somewhat smaller Myford.
I am pretty sure that armed with these excellent books that you will even happier in the years to come.
Cheers

Norman

Offline ziggar

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Re: new acquisition
« Reply #14 on: October 30, 2012, 11:41:15 AM »
Thank you both, John and Norman

most helpfull
and im sure the books will fit on a Christmas wish-list somewhere  :D