Author Topic: My workshop  (Read 7761 times)

Online Art K

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My workshop
« on: September 17, 2014, 02:51:09 AM »
Hi all,
I must admit not getting much done on my engine lately. We've sort of had this garage project going on lately. The concrete slab has been done for a bit now. Last weekend I tore off the old shingles, have muscles I never realized. :Lol: So here's me working on the second side Sunday.

This morning the work crew showed up and here's the slab with the guys starting to lay out lumber.

This is the last photo I will pester you with.

This photo is actually from the neighbor's yard with the walls up and the particle board outer walls being installed. I'll post more as the project advances. This will replace the roof and siding and add 8 feet to the back of the garage, replacing my old 8 X 12 shop with an 8 X 20 and give back the two car garage. Now it's time for a :DrinkPint:
Art
"The beautiful thing about learning is that no one can take it away from you" B.B. King

Offline Kim

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Re: My workshop
« Reply #1 on: September 17, 2014, 03:13:00 AM »
Looks like a great addition to the shop to me!
Be sure to keep us posted as you make progress on it,
Kim

Arbalest

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Re: My workshop
« Reply #2 on: September 17, 2014, 01:34:20 PM »
Looking good!

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: My workshop
« Reply #3 on: September 17, 2014, 01:39:29 PM »
That extra space is going to be nice!

Dave

Online Art K

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Re: My workshop
« Reply #4 on: September 23, 2014, 02:17:04 AM »
Hi,
Ok there has been more progress on the garage, workshop. Here are a few photos from late last week. They started on the back, replaced the bad plywood sections on the roof then loaded the shingles on the roof ready for the following day.

This was the results after they finished on Friday, ready for the siding.

What isn't reflected here is all the work I did tearing down the walls of the old workshop, scrapping the drywall and saving the 2 X 6's for new work benches. More later...
Art
"The beautiful thing about learning is that no one can take it away from you" B.B. King

Online Art K

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Re: My workshop
« Reply #5 on: October 05, 2014, 03:33:50 AM »
Hi all,
Ok more progress on the garage. The guys are almost done with the external portion of the project, and it looked like this.

They were only waiting for the garage door that was on special order. But when they got it home from the dig box store it looked like this.

It appears that they used my door as a pallet and had stacked 3-4 nine foot doors on my 16 footer, effectively folding it. So now it looks like this while I wait for the replacement.

They had already begun to cut the door up to fit the scrap it the truck, need I say haw upset the builder was. Other than that the rough electrical is done and ready for the city inspector. More news when it happens.
Art
"The beautiful thing about learning is that no one can take it away from you" B.B. King

Online Art K

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Re: My workshop
« Reply #6 on: December 21, 2014, 09:26:26 PM »
Hi all,
It took about three weeks for the replacement garage door to come in and then most of a day to install. They came back to install the drywall and to keep in budget I did the mudding.
I have discovered that it takes about two days for the mud to dry completely.
With the wonders of the internet I found a you tube video how to mud corners, more than I knew before. It feels like I'm plodding along, I hope to move the machines in January.
Art
"The beautiful thing about learning is that no one can take it away from you" B.B. King

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: My workshop
« Reply #7 on: December 21, 2014, 10:56:49 PM »
That is looking great Art. Will you be using the whole thing for your shop or just the addition. Either way I am envious  :LickLips:

Bill

Offline stevehuckss396

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Re: My workshop
« Reply #8 on: December 21, 2014, 11:08:59 PM »
NICE!
Do not be like the cat who wanted a fish but was afraid to get his paws wet.

Online Art K

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Re: My workshop
« Reply #9 on: February 23, 2015, 12:31:56 AM »
Hi all,
Ok I see I had grandiose ideas about moving the machines in January a few posts back. But I have been moving forward, the drywall seams took a while to do and sand flat. I have the shop heated with an electric baseboard heater, but even with that it took 2 days to dry before I could sand it. Then there was the painting, oil based primer nasty stuff, even with a mask on. The paint was water based and was much better to work with. Then was the electrical my friend came out and did that. Then was the moment of truth, the city inspector came and checked it and everything passed. :cartwheel:
The latest work has involved moving the machines into the shop. The lathe was no problem I managed to roll that through the door myself. The mill was another story. My nephew came over to give me a hand Friday. I rented an engine hoist from A to Z, the one that will lift 1500 lbs. Placed the mill on the pallet jack, which I couldn't maneuver through the door. I then placed it on the Harbor Freight castors I bought the last time it was moved and rolled it through the door, easy as pie. Sorry I didn't think to take pictures of this process. But did once it was in the new shop.
In the fore ground is the "new" mill stand I bought from a Tormach employee, I'm not sure if it was a prototype or made by a local shop. At any rate it was less than half the price of Tormach's. The main Problem was that he was using the 770 mill on it and I had to use the angle grinder, chisel and a BFH to remove the mounting pads. Bolt them onto the base of the mill, properly line up the mill on the stand and tack weld them in place. Unbolt, lift the mill, weld them solidly in place then re-paint.

Thankfully I have a good friend from High School who does auto body and has a "working" welder. The one I got from my Dad didn't, almost ruining my plans for the weekend move. The final part is dropping off the rental hoist before 8:00 am Monday.
Art
"The beautiful thing about learning is that no one can take it away from you" B.B. King

Online Art K

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Re: My workshop
« Reply #10 on: March 25, 2015, 02:08:56 AM »
Ok not to much to show, translated means no pictures. But some movement, the baseboard trim is installed and the machines are in place. This past Friday my tool and die friend came over with his Starrett machine level and within about 45 minutes we had both the lathe and mill in the middle of the bubble or .0005 in 10 feet. We'll check it again in the fall. He enjoyed putting on the supervisor hat. Next on the agenda is moving the old bench and getting things set up. I feel like I moved & cant find anything.
Art
"The beautiful thing about learning is that no one can take it away from you" B.B. King

Offline philjoe5

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Re: My workshop
« Reply #11 on: March 25, 2015, 02:41:57 AM »
Super work space Art.  Take lots of pictures while it's in mint condition.

See you soon.

Cheers,
Phil
If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man.  - Mark Twain

Offline 90LX_Notch

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Re: My workshop
« Reply #12 on: March 25, 2015, 09:01:15 AM »
Very nice Art, very nice.

-Bob
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Offline Jo

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Re: My workshop
« Reply #13 on: March 25, 2015, 09:09:49 AM »
This past Friday my tool and die friend came over with his Starrett machine level and within about 45 minutes we had both the lathe and mill in the middle of the bubble or .0005 in 10 feet. We'll check it again in the fall.

 :headscratch: I am never sure about the need for all this machine levelling. To quote the manual of my next  :naughty: lathe:

"The Hardinge HLV :Love: lathe is designed to operate without the need of a special foundation, any substantial floor is satisfactory if it is reasonably flat and level. The three point bearing arrangement make accurate levelling unnecessary. Levelling should be such as to be reasonable and so that coolant will properly drain back into sump from the ends of the pan. "

I just need the lathe  :embarassed:

Jo
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Offline Stuart

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Re: My workshop
« Reply #14 on: March 25, 2015, 12:24:13 PM »
My two pence

Ships have lathes and they are never level

My thoughts are that the machine should have no twist and be true to itself


Stuart
My aim is for a accurate part with a good finish

Offline pgp001

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Re: My workshop
« Reply #15 on: March 25, 2015, 12:59:35 PM »
I agree

As long as the bed has no twist or misalignment then all is well.
I have my lathes set so that the coolant drains to one end effectively.

Phil

Online Art K

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Re: My workshop
« Reply #16 on: March 26, 2015, 01:31:32 AM »
It may not be absolutely necessary, but a lathe can seem straight but be twisted and I think I've used some of those ones. Runs a taper when there was no reason for it and I was always polishing it out. I think it helps overall accuracy, and eliminates a potential problem. And my friend has a machine level and all it cost me was a beer :DrinkPint:
Art
"The beautiful thing about learning is that no one can take it away from you" B.B. King

Offline Stuart

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Re: My workshop
« Reply #17 on: March 26, 2015, 08:04:19 AM »
I will pose a question re machine levelling

On a long machine and the ones that do not have a bed persay only a pad to set up the carage and tail stock ,levelling is not possible in the normal way , because the said machine including steam turbines for power generation sit on a big ball , so if the ends are level then the middle Is high?

So we're is the level here .

The old way before lasers was to use a wire but this still left the middle high ?

Just a bit of thinking out loud so to speak

Stuart

My aim is for a accurate part with a good finish

Offline Mark

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Re: My workshop
« Reply #18 on: May 28, 2015, 02:13:32 PM »
Hi Art

Workshop is looking good have to say though I have Mill envy  :)  have watched a lot online about those Tormach CNC mills they look great John over at NYCCNC https://www.youtube.com/user/saunixcomp on YouTube has some great videos about setting up and using might be of use to you.
Hope all progresses well.

Regards

Mark