Author Topic: New Space  (Read 5727 times)

Online Jo

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Re: New Space
« Reply #15 on: September 20, 2014, 03:47:04 PM »
Dehumidifiers are expensive to run: I know I have got one. They also freeze in the winter if the air temperature gets too cold :facepalm:

Oil filled radiators are very nice and give good background heat. Personally I have solar power so my aim is to use all the free electric that comes out of the sky to heat the workshop while it is available so the last thing I need is a thermostat to stop using the available (free) power so I use a fan heater with the thermostat wound up so that it does no come on until it is very, very warm  8).

And I aim the fan heater at the larger machine tools to warm them so that they act as large storage heaters  ;)

Jo
Enjoyment is more important than achievement.

Offline mikemill

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Re: New Space
« Reply #16 on: September 20, 2014, 04:20:31 PM »
Arbalest

The most efficient heater is a small gas portable gas heater run on propane found on ebay, my one has a high and low setting I put it on high for about an hour the back it off to the lower setting and keeps a very comfortable temp, my workshop is around 30 x12ft, no problem with humidity as with butane. Thats a nice space you have built, but it soon disapears as you fill it wih kit!!
Mike

Online Jo

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Re: New Space
« Reply #17 on: September 20, 2014, 05:07:28 PM »
no problem with humidity as with butane.

(Propane) C3H8 + 5O2 ---> 3CO2 + 4H2O   :toilet_claw:

Jo
Enjoyment is more important than achievement.

Offline Ramon

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Re: New Space
« Reply #18 on: September 20, 2014, 05:43:30 PM »
Hi Arbalest - speaking from the experience of my own situation oil filled radiators are the way to go. Virtually everyone who visits the workshop for the first time remarks on how nice and warm it is!

My wood walled and floored  workshop - 14' X 14' which has an extension to one side 14' x 8' is heated by two of these radiators - one in each area. The walls are insulated with rock-wool covered with hardboard as is the roof. The windows are double glazed.
The 'seven finned' heaters whose output is 1,2 or 3KW have never been used on anything but the 1KW setting and except for the warmer months they are run all the time at the same setting - I do not use the frost setting nor have ever required the need for auxiliary heating. This way the temperature stays, within reason, stable around 60-65 degrees so the heaters are not having to 'work' constantly to heat air that is then allowed to cool only to be reheated.

Efficient? Cost effective? I can't honestly say but I do know that the 'Chancellor', who believe me keeps tabs and controls on such matters noticed a real difference in bills when these replaced the two tubular 260 watt greenhouse heaters that were on all the time without thermostats and they did require auxiliary heating on colder days. I like to be comfortable while I work - not wrapped up in several layers to combat low temperatures so these have completely done away with that situation. I don't know what the exact cost is but I see it as part of the cost of participating in the hobby - not much fun if you can't use it because it's too cold or cost the earth to heat and reheat large volumes of air but I do use my workshop every day.

One other benefit of keeping the temperature stable is that rust is never a problem either - the only thing that exhibits the faintest patina is steel stock under the bench which has not been touched for years and the small blocks I use as packing on the mill - again something that is not used with frequency. The lathe, mill, drill and surface plate are never affected.

After singing their praises at our Boat Club two 3KW heaters were bought last year. The 1920s concrete building is not the warmest of places but since fitting them the club room is always warm first thing - not like before when two fan heaters would struggle for ages to get the temp up creating loads of condensation.

As you can no doubt guess - I swear by them ;)

Hope this helps you some

Ramon

"I ain't here for the long time but I am here for a good time"
(a very apt phrase - thanks to a well meaning MEM friend)

Arbalest

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Re: New Space
« Reply #19 on: September 20, 2014, 06:47:29 PM »
Thanks for your thoughts folks, think I'll have a look at some oil filled radiators!

Arbalest

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Re: New Space
« Reply #20 on: October 04, 2014, 05:58:05 PM »
Some progress!


Offline Roger B

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Re: New Space
« Reply #21 on: October 04, 2014, 06:56:21 PM »
Coming along nicely  :ThumbsUp:  :ThumbsUp: How will you cope with swarf and oil on your nice new floor and walls (and maybe ceiling!)  ::)
Best regards

Roger

Arbalest

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Re: New Space
« Reply #22 on: October 04, 2014, 10:11:47 PM »
Compared to the rough concrete floor of my last few workshops it should be a bit easier to sweep clean.

The head is now on the mill with enough room to open the cover and remove the drawbar. There is however no room left to fit a riser block in the future so I'm now thinking it may be better to move the white cabinets in the picture to the right and move the mill to the middle of the end wall. Can't make up my mind though. I don't have a lathe big enough to make a riser and not sure I can afford to buy one. I do rather like the mill in it's present position as well. I had planned to take the hoist apart for storage after moving all the heavy stuff, I suppose I could put it all back together again later if I need it ... Decisions, decisions!  :naughty: