Author Topic: Flathead V-8  (Read 141379 times)

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Flathead V-8
« Reply #30 on: July 30, 2014, 09:37:19 PM »
Lots of parts there George, just waiting for your magic touch!!  Looking great.

Bill

Offline Johnmcc69

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Re: Flathead V-8
« Reply #31 on: July 31, 2014, 03:11:09 AM »
Wow George! Fantastic modeling for being self taught. No doubt this will be another work of art. Can't wait to see the chips fly.

 John

Offline Mosey

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Re: Flathead V-8
« Reply #32 on: July 31, 2014, 05:49:31 PM »
If ever there was a good candidate for 3D printing, it's that pan, but then, we'd miss seeing George carve it out of billet!
Mosey

Offline Roger B

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Re: Flathead V-8
« Reply #33 on: July 31, 2014, 06:36:54 PM »
Or make some dies and deep draw it  :mischief:
Best regards

Roger

Offline cfellows

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Re: Flathead V-8
« Reply #34 on: August 01, 2014, 04:47:39 AM »
Issue 31 of Model Engine Builder has an article featuring Roger Butzen's Ford flathead model engine.  Plans are apparently also for sale.

Chuck
So many projects, so little time...

Offline gbritnell

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Re: Flathead V-8
« Reply #35 on: October 30, 2014, 11:58:13 PM »
Gentlemen,
Well the exhibition season is over. I attended the Zanesville, Ohio show a couple of weeks back and when I got home everything was cleaned up and put away till spring. Boy I don't know if I'll make it!
It was time to start making some chips. Although I had purchased the aluminum about 6 weeks ago I got sidetracked helping a fellow get one of his engines running so with that out of the way it was time to start. To get a piece of aluminum large enough I had to buy a piece of 6" round 7-1/4" long. Man I thought brass was getting expensive but it trickled down to the aluminum also.  I took the piece of stock over to my buddy's shop and we cut a big chunk from the round vertically. Trying to get this thing squared up was truly a chore. Even with the new mill it took some tricks to set it up.

Talent unshared is talent wasted.

Offline gbritnell

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Re: Flathead V-8
« Reply #36 on: October 31, 2014, 12:09:21 AM »
With the overall dimensions cut to size, leaving a couple of thousands for the eventual need for cleanup or resquaring, the next step was to make a fixture plate to work from. My same friend who cut the slab from the original bar has a nice surface grinder so he flattened up a piece of 1/2" aluminum plate for the job. This plate will serve for the many machining operations yet to come. I put 3 holes in each end of the plate, one a clearance hole for a 5/16 bolt which will go into a T-nut in the angle table. Another a 5/16 threaded hole for a bolt to hold down the block and a third hole that was threaded and counterbored for a locating disc that would fit snugly in the T-slot on the angle  table. Rather than try to hold the part with clamps there are 2 blocks that fit over brass plugs which go into the cam hole at each end. The block is also drilled through for the 5/16 bolt and threaded 1/4-20 for a jack post out on the end.
Talent unshared is talent wasted.

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Flathead V-8
« Reply #37 on: October 31, 2014, 12:16:18 AM »
Nice to see you making chips again George...and LOTS of them too!!

Bill

Offline gbritnell

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Re: Flathead V-8
« Reply #38 on: October 31, 2014, 12:20:55 AM »
The fixture plate also has 2 sets of holes to locate the block, 2- .125 diameter holes in the top surface, which eventually will be milled away and 2- .093 holes on the pan rail which will be covered by the oil pan when assembled. The fixture plate was mounted on my 7x10 angle table and everything was indicated square. The block was mounted and the table tilted to 45 degrees and indicated for a true angle.
Cuts were made until I was close to the layout line then the clamps were removed so I could depth mike down to the brass dowel pins. A finish number was established so the clamps were reset and the final cut taken. While I was cutting the head deck I removed a little stock from the outer side wall.
The whole fixture plate was removed from the angle table, turned 180 and remounted. This was much easier than tilting it 45 degrees back the other way and then having to reindicate the angle.
As with any job cut from solid the chips sure build up quickly.
gbritnell
Talent unshared is talent wasted.

Offline gbritnell

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Re: Flathead V-8
« Reply #39 on: October 31, 2014, 12:25:34 AM »
Thanks Bill,
Yes I was really getting anxious to start cutting on this engine. It's kind of like painting a picture. When you're staring at the blank sheet of paper you hate to dive in but one you make some marks you just keep going. With this really huge piece of aluminum staring me in the face I didn't know if I really wanted to do this but once the first cuts were made it was like old home week.
I don't think this one will be a fall, winter spring project. I'm sure this one will take me into 2016 with no trouble. Although I might surprise myself.
gbritnell
Talent unshared is talent wasted.

Offline Don1966

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Re: Flathead V-8
« Reply #40 on: October 31, 2014, 01:13:23 AM »
George I'm glad to see you back making Swarf. You have made some amazing progress and I don't think 2016 will be your completion date, more like 2015. I will be following with great interest.

 :popcorn:
Don

Offline Roger B

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Re: Flathead V-8
« Reply #41 on: October 31, 2014, 08:53:44 AM »
Glad you're back in the workshop  :ThumbsUp: That's a good lump of aluminium. It reminds me of a spoof advert in Mad magazine many years ago. The advert was for a wooden model ship describing all the features and saying that full instructions and tools were included.

What was actually supplied was a block of wood, a knife and a picture of the ship. The instructions were 'cut away everything that does not look like the picture'.

That's what you are doing 'cut away everything that does not look like a flathead V-8 cylinder block'  ;)
Best regards

Roger

Offline Tennessee Whiskey

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Re: Flathead V-8
« Reply #42 on: October 31, 2014, 12:42:40 PM »
George, great start to a great project. You mentioned a new mill and from the pic it looks to be the same mill Don and I have; so, how's it working for you? You also mentioned grinding the fixture plate on a surface grinder. Being the un-proud owner of a grinder that didn't work out, but, still looking for the "right one", I'm curious as to what type of wheel do you use to grind aluminum. Since the first brush stroke has been cast, I can't wait to see this one "framed and hung" ;)

Eric

Offline Mosey

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Re: Flathead V-8
« Reply #43 on: October 31, 2014, 12:58:03 PM »
George,
Brilliant, instructive, and amazing  .

I have a pile of chips, also, the similarity stops there.

Steady on!   :smokin2:
On further thought, it occurs to me that the greatest value of George's post is the illustration of his thoughtful planning of the necessary steps to machining the work, and creation of a jig to hold his work to make that possible. That's what I learned.


Mosey
« Last Edit: October 31, 2014, 02:20:42 PM by Mosey »

Offline gbritnell

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Re: Flathead V-8
« Reply #44 on: October 31, 2014, 02:33:15 PM »
Hi Eric,
Here's a write-up I did about the mill, from purchase to use.
gbritnell
http://www.homemodelenginemachinist.com/showthread.php?t=15713
Talent unshared is talent wasted.