Author Topic: Flathead V-8  (Read 140834 times)

Offline DavidF

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Re: Flathead V-8
« Reply #15 on: July 18, 2014, 05:08:59 AM »
Im tuned in!!!

Online gbritnell

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Re: Flathead V-8
« Reply #16 on: July 24, 2014, 10:54:56 PM »
I've had time to model a few more parts, the intake and exhaust manifolds. As with the heads the intake will also be a fabrication, the main upper part and the lower cover plate/mounting flange. This will be made from brass like my 302 intake and silver soldered together.
gbritnell
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Offline kvom

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Re: Flathead V-8
« Reply #17 on: July 24, 2014, 11:02:42 PM »
Rounding the ends on all those little fins in the heads might be tricky.  Waiting to see how you handle that.

Fascinating project.

Online gbritnell

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Re: Flathead V-8
« Reply #18 on: July 27, 2014, 02:10:19 PM »
Gentlemen,
Not much time spent in the shop as this summer seems to be racing by at supersonic speeds so I have to enjoy every minute of it that I can. In the evenings when everything quiets down I sit at the computer working with my CAD programs and continue with the design and modeling of the engine. I have the timing cover finished along with a water pump. The parts that require mirror opposites won't be modeled mainly because of the many hours that it takes to do just the original and one is all that's needed to see what it looks like and how it will fit.
To give an idea of the size of the engine I kind of started making drawings of a full sized Ford flathead and then scaled them by 3 tenths (.30). With the change in design the cylinder spacing was moved a little closer so that shortened the block by a little. Right now the length of the bare block is 6.75 and the width is about 3.00 inches.
As with any of these projects adjustments have to be made for the purposes of modeling, wall thicknesses, fastener sizes etc.
gbritnell
Talent unshared is talent wasted.

Offline maury

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Re: Flathead V-8
« Reply #19 on: July 27, 2014, 05:32:48 PM »
George, very nice modeling. I can't  wait to see this one next April. BTW, thanks for the video of the 6 cyl over on the Smokstak. It was a pleasure to watch. Also a vey nice engine.

It's good to see someone preserving these historic engines.

maury
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Offline Johnmcc69

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Re: Flathead V-8
« Reply #20 on: July 27, 2014, 10:18:45 PM »
Nice work George! I'm loving this! I'm not sure what CAD you are using, but some programs have the ability to save a mirror image of parts & assemblies as new (or dependent) files. In Pro-E, I can go to "file" & "Mirror part/assembly". I use this a lot when modeling traction engine wheels with the grouters, hubs, & spokes.

 Keep the updates coming.

 John

Offline Mosey

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Re: Flathead V-8
« Reply #21 on: July 27, 2014, 10:26:18 PM »
george,
I have my seat belt fastened for another fantastic journey watching you build! Can't wait.
Mosey

Offline Art K

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Re: Flathead V-8
« Reply #22 on: July 27, 2014, 10:57:05 PM »
George,
It's great to see your progress on this engine. Just out of curiosity how did Ford route the exhaust through the block? I know they have 3 ports on the outside of the block, Did they all run through the water jacket with the center cylinders siamesed? I wish I knew someone with a block laying around to look at.
Art
"The beautiful thing about learning is that no one can take it away from you" B.B. King

Online gbritnell

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Re: Flathead V-8
« Reply #23 on: July 28, 2014, 01:55:40 AM »
Hi John,
I'm using an older version of Solidworks that my son used in school. I'm self taught on this one so I pick up things as I use it. It does have the ability to mirror images but if you delete the original the mirror is corrupted, at least the way I'm doing it. If someone can help me I'm open for suggestions.
Art,
The center 2 exhaust runners come from the valve pockets on top of the block and curve around the inner two cylinders which are spaced farther apart to accommodate them. Where they meet they are siamesed together and then exit the outside of the block. The end two runners curve around the outside of the end cylinders and then out of the block. The runners are spaced away from the cylinder walls to allow coolant to circulate between them. Even at that these engines were known to overheat rather easily. If you do a search for Ford flathead block images and look at the head deck you will see a large water opening between the center two cylinders and inside of this opening you will see the exhaust runner curving around the cylinder.
gbritnell
Talent unshared is talent wasted.

Offline Art K

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Re: Flathead V-8
« Reply #24 on: July 28, 2014, 03:37:13 AM »
George,
Thanks for the photo and explanation.
Art
"The beautiful thing about learning is that no one can take it away from you" B.B. King

Online steamer

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Re: Flathead V-8
« Reply #25 on: July 28, 2014, 09:46:28 AM »
Coming along great George!    Following along!

Dave
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Offline jschoenly

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Re: Flathead V-8
« Reply #26 on: July 28, 2014, 02:02:31 PM »
George,

If you don't mind the file size getting a little large, here is what I do (with Solidworks).  You can create a new part file (say "Left" if the currently modeled part is "Right").  Under insert, you can bring in the "right" part in this new model (don't give it any constraints and it uses the same original as the other part).  Then (using the cylinder head as an example) I would use the sealing surface of the head as the mirror plane and use the mirror function BUT....  Look for the "merge" either results or solids check box.  Un-check that box and you will end up with two heads touching at the gasket surface.  Having not merged them, you should also end up with a "solid bodies" section of the model tree and there should be 2 if you open the check box.  If you hide the original body, you are left with the mirrored head (and a little larger file size).  The cool thins about this is if you then make changes to the "right" head, when you open the "left" you just created, it will update the changes in the mirror's version. 

This is a great way to make a "complete" model.  If you also wanted to make a right and left with MOST of the same mirrored features, make a generic Right model, then insert that (which has the shared features) into a new "right" part like above without the mirror and make some other features there.  Then you can do the "left" part like above as well.  You can do some really amazing things with a little patience. ;)  If you need any help with that or interested in other tid-bits, feel free to contact me. 

Jared
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Offline dieselpilot

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Re: Flathead V-8
« Reply #27 on: July 28, 2014, 02:59:52 PM »
If the parts are truly identical the mirror function is perfect and you shouldn't have a situation where you delete the original part. If you must create a mirrored part with no associations I create a copy and go through the feature tree from top to bottom reversing extrude directions, etc., feature by feature and correct errors as I go along. This is much easier than it sounds as most features fall right into place.

Greg

Online gbritnell

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Re: Flathead V-8
« Reply #28 on: July 28, 2014, 03:12:21 PM »
Thanks fellows,
I knew someone out there would steer me in the right direction.
gbritnell
Talent unshared is talent wasted.

Online gbritnell

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Re: Flathead V-8
« Reply #29 on: July 30, 2014, 07:54:57 PM »
Well I have now added mirroring to my skill set but it took a little doing. Since then I have added a few more parts. Thanks again fellows. The pan took some head scratching but came out the way I wanted it.
gbritnell
Talent unshared is talent wasted.