Author Topic: Building Kozo's New Shay locomotive  (Read 153665 times)

Offline crueby

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Re: Building Kozo's New Shay locomotive
« Reply #30 on: June 29, 2014, 02:52:45 PM »
Its beautiful crueby!! What is the overall length of the frame?

Bill

Thanks! The overall length is 32", width 6.75". Weighed in at a little over 10 pounds so far.

Offline crueby

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Re: Building Kozo's New Shay locomotive
« Reply #31 on: June 29, 2014, 02:59:58 PM »
I like that mill set up! :ThumbsUp:

Very creative!   Should work just fine, and pushes the limit of a small mill!


Dave

Didn't need it for these parts, but also have a headstock riser block that increases the reach out front by another inch, comes in handy for clearance to cut large gears. The column I have on is a taller aftermarket one, sherlines column runs out quick with rotary table, chuck, drillchuck, and drill all stacked up...  So far on the loco I only used the lathe for the poling pocket cylinders, everything else has been just on the mill.


Offline crueby

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Re: Building Kozo's New Shay locomotive
« Reply #32 on: June 30, 2014, 08:37:58 PM »
I got a coat of paint on the main frame assembly - amazing how it changes the appearance of it all. I used some satin-finish high temperature grill paint, thinned down and airbrushed on. Below are some pictures of it sitting out in the sun to cure up (another 90 degree (F, not C!) day, perfect for it).

While waiting for it to dry, I read ahead the next chapter in Kozo's book on the truck assemblies. Sure are a lot of parts in those (wheels, axels, suspension, brakes, gears) - more than in a lot of whole engines I have done - should keep me busy for a while! So far a very enjoyable build, learning a lot from his book.

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Building Kozo's New Shay locomotive
« Reply #33 on: July 01, 2014, 12:25:34 AM »
That looks really nice crueby!!  I do hope its less humid though where you are. Down here it would take a week to dry...especially outside. Almost a shame to cover up that brass but it does look more loco-ish in black :)

Bill

Offline PStechPaul

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Re: Building Kozo's New Shay locomotive
« Reply #34 on: July 01, 2014, 02:03:52 AM »
Do you have a track layout for this to run on? I have often dreamed of building a rideable railway on my 2.5 acre property which includes a rather steep hill (maybe a candidate for a cog railway), and lots of forest and a stream (which would make for a challenging and exciting bridge. My idea was to make it electric and use it to haul down cut logs from the forest on top of the hill and possibly recouping much of the energy used going up with dynamic regenerative braking. Of course, I might also be able to use a wood-powered steam engine, and the Shay design is good for steep hills and uneven temporary tracks. My feeling is that it would cost about the same amount of effort and time, and not that much more in materials, to make one that is rideable.
 
Actually, looking into rideable trains, I found that 1" and 1.5" scale trains are rideable, and yours may be large enough. Tracks are 4-3/4" gauge for 1" scale and 7-1/4" or 7-1/2" gauge for 1.5" scale:
http://www.ridingrailkits.com/scale/oneinchscale.php
 

Offline crueby

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Re: Building Kozo's New Shay locomotive
« Reply #35 on: July 01, 2014, 03:49:41 PM »
I dont have my own layout, though there are some clubs around here that maintain them.

If I lay enough track in the yard, and have it tow the lawn mower..... hmmmm!

Offline crueby

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Re: Building Kozo's New Shay locomotive
« Reply #36 on: July 05, 2014, 08:39:16 PM »
Got a start on the wheels for the loco - started off with a length of 2 3/8" steel round bar (heavy sucker!) for the rims, and sliced it into a series of hockey pucks, one per wheel. First one I tried using a hacksaw, then after the arm turned to rubber most of the way through, went and dug out the reciprocating saw and a metal cutting blade to do the rest. Much easier!

Following Kozo's sequences from the book, first faced off the blanks and drilled a hole in the center to start boring out to the inner diameter of the rim. Then cut a step, which will form the bearing surface of the wheel, and then turned it around to face off the back side to thickness and turn the high part of the step down to diameter.

This (and 7 more to do) form the slightly oversize blanks for the rims of the wheels. They will get spokes and inner hubs silver soldered in, then will be trued/turned down to final outer dimensions. Right now they dont look like much, but lot of work given the size of them - largest pieces I can turn on the Sherline without putting in a riser block...

Offline PStechPaul

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Re: Building Kozo's New Shay locomotive
« Reply #37 on: July 05, 2014, 11:54:45 PM »
Nice work! You might look for steel discs precut to 1/2" or 1", or possibly something like schedule 80 steel pipe where 2" nominal size is 2.375" OD and 1.913" ID. Maybe schedule 160 if you need thicker walls (0.343"). Might save a lot of cutting and boring!
http://www.engineersedge.com/pipe_schedules.htm
 
Like this:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Pipe-Nipple-Pipe-Size-2-x-3-Seamless-Black-Steel-Schedule-160-Class-150-/331223720918

 
 

Offline crueby

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Re: Building Kozo's New Shay locomotive
« Reply #38 on: July 06, 2014, 01:18:39 AM »
The sched 160 is remarkably close, did not know they came that thick. Have to keep that in mind for future work, thanks! It would have worked for these rims with only a 0.040 change to the inner diameter, just making the spokes a bit longer. Oh well, next time!

Sounds like a good source for flywheel rim material too... Hmmm....

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Building Kozo's New Shay locomotive
« Reply #39 on: July 06, 2014, 01:35:44 AM »
Crueby, despite the extra work, I think you will be far happier with the steel you used. You can expect a  far better finish which is evident in the picture of your completed blank!! I am not a fan of machinine black iron pipe and find it very stringy at best.

Bill

Offline crueby

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Re: Building Kozo's New Shay locomotive
« Reply #40 on: July 06, 2014, 01:49:07 AM »
Crueby, despite the extra work, I think you will be far happier with the steel you used. You can expect a  far better finish which is evident in the picture of your completed blank!! I am not a fan of machinine black iron pipe and find it very stringy at best.

Bill

Thanks for the tip - have not tried using it before - have used cast iron castings, which are messy/grainy to work with. I was just checking prices too, and it was not all that different for solid steel vs the iron pipe. Once I settled on a way to cut the disks, it has gone pretty quickly. Guess it like most things, you can get convenience, usually at a price (in one form or another).

Offline crueby

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Re: Building Kozo's New Shay locomotive
« Reply #41 on: July 09, 2014, 06:16:03 PM »
I got the hubs for the wheels cut - simple cylinders, with a 2-56 hole tapped in one side to hold it into the soldering jig (the hub and all 8 spokes will have a screw holding them to the jig, which rests on the back of the rim for soldering). The extra-observant of you may notice that there are 9 sets of parts - am making up an extra wheel, just in case of problems doing the final machining/truing. If all 9 come out okay, then one will make a nice display piece (hang it on the back of the tender like a Jeep spare tire maybe??!)

For the spokes, took a length of rectangular bar and rounded one side on the sander. The spoke material is held in the machine vise, and using a dial indicator to get the length of cut, the spokes are cut off with a slitting saw.

The last photo is a shot of the test fit of the first batch of spokes with the first wheel. Got a close fit (took a few tries to get the correct length), so time to run off the spokes on the rest of the wheels.

Offline crueby

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Re: Building Kozo's New Shay locomotive
« Reply #42 on: July 17, 2014, 01:04:54 AM »
Been an interesting few days - got the spokes made, and also the soldering jigs as Kozo describes. The jigs made soldering them up a breeze.

First step since last time was to put a notch in the back corners of the spokes - this notch is to hold the little length of silver solder wire in place for each end of the spokes. They were done up in batches, using an alignment jig made from a scrap of brass to line them all up in the vice,where they were notched with an end mill.

The spokes and hub are all held in place with a sheet metal soldering jig, with holes at all the joints that both served to let me put the solder in, and also to keep the sheet metal from soldering itself to the wheel (had one wheel where the solder floated up on a bubble as the flux melted - had to break that one free like a sardine can lid, it will get faced off in the lathe in the next step anyway, so no harm done). There are also larger holes between the spokes to let the flame/heat through - they assembly is placed sheet metal up between two firebricks for soldering. The book gives all the dimensions for the jig, well worth the time to make up. I made 4 of them, drilled all together in a stack. That let me solder up all the wheels in two sessions.

Each piece is held in place with a 2-56 screw - meant a LOT of small holes to tap, did break a tap in one near the last piece, but was easy to drill out after heating it red with a torch and letting it air cool - that took the hardness out of the tap end so it would drill out easy.

After soldering, the back face of the wheels is faced off to thickness, and the steps in the spokes are also turned off.

Very happy with how they all soldered up - getting more comfortable with silver soldering with each piece.

Next step will be to face off the front of the wheels, bore for the axles, and finish turn the rims. The hubs/spokes will be painted, think I will put a little JB weld in the holes in the backs of the spokes first to smooth them out.

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Building Kozo's New Shay locomotive
« Reply #43 on: July 17, 2014, 01:17:53 AM »
Lots of work on those crueby, but they sure turned out well. Thanks for the update.

Bill

Offline crueby

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Re: Building Kozo's New Shay locomotive
« Reply #44 on: July 20, 2014, 11:43:48 PM »
The wheels are almost done now (just need to drill for the gear bolts and paint the spokes/hubs).
Got the wheels faced off to final width and the axle holes bored/reamed to size, then mounted the wheels on an arbor (turned to a sliding fit on the wheels, and left in place in the chuck till all were turned so it was absolutely true) for turning the tread and rim to size. Then, the headstock was turned 3 degrees so I could taper the tread surface, then 10 degrees the other way to taper the rim. The corners were rounded with a file while turning.

That completes the main fabrication on the wheels. The right side hubs will be drilled/tapped for the bevel gears, and all of them will have the hubs/spokes painted black. The rims stay clear, just polished.

As it turned out, I am glad I made one extra wheel assembly - one did get botched somehow in the axle hole, think it slipped in the chuck or the drill wandered a touch - came out slightly wobbly. So, that one goes in the trains trunk as a spare...!