Author Topic: Project #3 and #4  (Read 1812 times)

Offline doubletop

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Project #3 and #4
« on: July 26, 2012, 10:10:40 AM »
Buoyed by the success of my first attempt at building an engine and boiler I needed something a bit more ambitious. Again free plans from the internet for the engine


As it's marine engine it needed a marine boiler. The Scotch boiler looked interesting but I couldn't find and plans, so did my own.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xLdz6jHvYi8" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xLdz6jHvYi8</a>

I'll admit that the burner doesn't stay alight that we'll and occasionally 'pops' out. Not good for a boat so it never got near one. But if you want the plans they are attached below

Pete

?To achieve anything in this game, you must be prepared to dabble on the boundary of disaster.? - Stirling Moss

Offline mzt

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Re: Project #3 and #4
« Reply #1 on: July 26, 2012, 11:01:51 AM »
Is that a nice take on J.P.Duval's MV-DEO 10x20?

Marcello
This is a fitting job,
not a production job that can be measured in.

Offline lazylathe

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Re: Project #3 and #4
« Reply #2 on: July 26, 2012, 11:45:09 AM »
Great job Pete!

Looks like a good runner you have there!
Pity the burner makes so much noise, i wanted to hear the engine running.

Andrew
A new place to hide my swarf!

Offline doubletop

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Re: Project #3 and #4
« Reply #3 on: July 27, 2012, 09:07:22 AM »
Marcello

Yes it's JP Duvals design. He does some great engines

Adrian

I also have this video of its first run.  I now realise how noisy it is, but in my defence it was one of my earlier efforts. I particularly like the speed control and how effective it is.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vW-cKh8jIM0" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vW-cKh8jIM0</a>

Pete
?To achieve anything in this game, you must be prepared to dabble on the boundary of disaster.? - Stirling Moss

Offline mzt

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Re: Project #3 and #4
« Reply #4 on: July 27, 2012, 12:16:00 PM »
Pete,

I've built it, too. My third, the first from metric plans.
I see You've been lazy.. ..screws in place of the brackets, tsk, tsk.  :Lol:
I didn't think about screws: made my brackets from steel sheet ... using an angle grinder. 

I had made it for a boat, too: never got close to making a boiler. Still have the boat plans, somewhere.
I do not have speakers on my pc, but for what I can see Your engine runs very well.

Marcello
This is a fitting job,
not a production job that can be measured in.

Bogstandard

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Re: Project #3 and #4
« Reply #5 on: July 28, 2012, 08:49:15 AM »
Pete,

It is that one I used to make (much modified from the original plans) as a bit of a commercial enterprise.

You say they are noisy, but I don't think so.

People tend to put too much pressure through them. On live steam, at most 20 psi, preferably 15, they will power a 4 to 5 ft boat. With the correct sized steam prop, about 3" diameter, they just gently nod away giving out plenty of power. It is because it is a long stroke engine, so is designed not to turn very fast.

I think you may have seen these before, the two types of engines I made them into.



This is a nearly 5ft long boat being powered by one of my engines.



He just took out the large Gemini engine, and dropped mine in it's place. It performed a lot better, plus it was much easier to control and more steam efficient.



BTW, a very nice build indeed. :NotWorthy: :NotWorthy:

 
John

Offline chuck foster

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Re: Project #3 and #4
« Reply #6 on: July 28, 2012, 02:23:46 PM »
nice engine and boiler pete  8)

i wonder why the flame goes out on the burner, not enough air to keep the flame burning??

thanks for posting the plans for the boiler.

chuck

Offline doubletop

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Re: Project #3 and #4
« Reply #7 on: July 29, 2012, 08:08:02 AM »
Thanks guys

I make no excuses for the screws they were supposed to be temporary but did the job. I also take no credit for the idea, take a look at Johns engines.

I do make an excuse for the noise it was making running. This was the first thing I'd made on my mill that was new at the time, in fact it was the first time I'd ever used a mill. The video was also the first time the engine had been run. As John pointed out anything over 20psi is too much, if you take another look at the pressure gauge I believe it was well above 20psi. After running in the engine has quietened down a lot and is now very smooth running.

These engines are superb, the speed control/reverser makes them very versatile. I'd imagine hundreds if not thousands have been made. John used to make a lot and I recall Stew did a batch of 15 at one point.

The boiler burner was a compromise in the end. I had originally intended to use a poker burner in a tube.



But that wouldn't work; there was no way enough secondary air was going to get down the far end of the tube. I tried various things without luck. In desperation I stuck the my Sievert burner into the end of the tube to see what happened. That worked so I copied it, hence the roar.  But still not enough secondary air really so it goes out occasionally. I know the commercial guys are successful with end on ceramic burners and I tried those as well, but that wasn't too good either. I think the starting point is a  larger fire-tube and possibly larger diameter boiler barrel and perhaps a bit shorter. That would  require the safety calculations re-doing. I was just using what I had to hand.

Hope that helps

Pete




?To achieve anything in this game, you must be prepared to dabble on the boundary of disaster.? - Stirling Moss