Author Topic: The dynamo and the tu-tu  (Read 31288 times)

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: The dynamo and the tu-tu
« Reply #90 on: February 18, 2014, 07:39:21 AM »
Thanks Doc and Ian.

Jeff that's a beautiful engine. Thanks for posting it.
I'm very familiar with voltage regulators. I'm not sure at this point if I'll take it that far. My main purpose was to do some machining, any machining, after a long long dry period.

I did take another look at spot facing the mounting holes for the base. I don't know what I was thinking earlier but it seems I have everything I need to do it.

One (or two) question I had...Should I have painted first? Doesn't seem right. How to keep the paint off the spot faced areas?
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Offline steamer

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Re: The dynamo and the tu-tu
« Reply #91 on: February 18, 2014, 10:24:26 AM »
For the bearings of a little generator/motor, the same steel as the shaft, unhardened would do, it only has to take off .001" or .002", and probably only off one bush, job done. But it would be worth hardening and tempering the reamer, and put it away carefully, and in years to come you can make another one "cause you can't remember where you put the first one,  it will turn up just after you finish with the new one :ROFL:  Ian S C

Or you do find it and you stand there wondering....what the hell did I make this for?.... :headscratch:

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Offline Ian S C

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Re: The dynamo and the tu-tu
« Reply #92 on: February 18, 2014, 12:23:18 PM »
Jeff, you'r right about varying voltages, and the speed of motors.  when I built my second Stirling Engine, I decided to run it for a long time, ended up at 2000 hours until an over haul was needed.  At the beginning, with the generator I used through out the test I was lucky to get 1.5volts to start with, a couple of days later,  it blew the 3V bulb I was using, put in 6V bulb, and a week later it was gone, its been running 12v automotive instrument panel bulbs since then.  I know I should have a voltage regulator, but I always try to squeeze as much out of my set up as I can, and where there is a circuit in place there is a voltage drop(how ever small).      Ian S C

Offline mklotz

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Re: The dynamo and the tu-tu
« Reply #93 on: February 18, 2014, 05:02:47 PM »
The object here isn't to provide dead flat DC to a Wheatstone bridge.  An open frame generator with a solid state regulator is a real technology clash.  Next thing you know you'll want to use LEDs.

No, instead you want a filament bulb flickering in synchrony with the engine to prove that it's really generating electricity and there aren't any batteries hidden in the base.
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Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: The dynamo and the tu-tu
« Reply #94 on: February 18, 2014, 10:49:36 PM »
An open frame generator with a solid state regulator is a real technology clash.

Oops

Next thing you know you'll want to use LEDs.

Oops again.

Actually haven't decided to do anything. But if I do...yeah, probably a voltage regulator and an LED.  ;D
Was that a decision?  :thinking:
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
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Offline Don1966

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Re: The dynamo and the tu-tu
« Reply #95 on: February 18, 2014, 11:58:36 PM »
Carl on my setup I didn't use a voltage regulator but I did use a jumbo Led because it looks more like a lamp bulb. I put the ballast resistor under the base in the wire tray. I select the resistor after finding out how much the generator would produced then calculated the resistor value to keep it bright.
http://s1247.photobucket.com/user/don1966/media/PROJECTS%20BUILT/MARINEENGINE_zps9336274e.mp4.html?sort=6&o=53


Don

Offline Tennessee Whiskey

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Re: The dynamo and the tu-tu
« Reply #96 on: February 19, 2014, 12:15:29 AM »
Hold on Don. If Zee hasn't and publicly stated he hasn't decided on something, well, let's just say, this may take awhile. Just remember which "save our world" law went into effect concerning light bulbs. And by the way, you can call it bubble, it's still big. Streisand once said; " I'm a curvy gal, it starts at my nose" :lolb:

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Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: The dynamo and the tu-tu
« Reply #97 on: February 19, 2014, 01:42:55 AM »
I remember seeing that Don. It may have been what got me wanting to build the generator in the first place.
We use a number of LEDs at work...blue, green, red and several infra-red (useless for this purpose). Used to scan banknotes for recognition. I haven't done much hardware for a number of years. But I remember (at least with the old LEDs) using a 330 or 180 ohm in a 5V circuit. Doesn't really matter. My main desire is that the light turns on and off...not brighten or dim. So a switch is probably in order.

And by the way, you can call it bubble, it's still big. Streisand once said; " I'm a curvy gal, it starts at my nose"

Well...you have seen it (zee bubble) so you're entitled to your opinion. But if I get a grope at CF...I will have to assume it's you since you've expressed so much interest.  ;D

As for Streisand...love her...always have. I remember a thread or two on the old forum that discussed this. Surprising to me the "love her / hate her" dichotomy. I did not get involved in that thread. Just didn't seem right.  ;D
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
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Offline Ian S C

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Re: The dynamo and the tu-tu
« Reply #98 on: February 19, 2014, 11:48:55 AM »
Another thing I use as an electrical load is a beat up old transistor radio.   Ian S C

Offline PStechPaul

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Re: The dynamo and the tu-tu
« Reply #99 on: February 22, 2014, 03:38:14 AM »
Interesting little dynamo project. I've always been fascinated with motors and generators. The one you have looks something like the little motors in my HO trains. I know how difficult it can be to get straight bushings to line up for smooth rotation. For the small switched reluctance motor I'm building, I am using some little 5mm ball bearings I popped out of some old plastic gears that I had used for my first attempt at a SRM, which also can function as a generator by adding magnets to the rotor:
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W6LwlhsnT-k" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W6LwlhsnT-k</a>
 

Offline Alan Haisley

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Re: The dynamo and the tu-tu
« Reply #100 on: February 22, 2014, 03:57:12 AM »
An open frame generator with a solid state regulator is a real technology clash.

Oops

Next thing you know you'll want to use LEDs.
Oops again.

Actually haven't decided to do anything. But if I do...yeah, probably a voltage regulator and an LED.  ;D
Was that a decision?  :thinking:


Perhaps a miniature "Jacob's Ladder"  :zap:
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Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: The dynamo and the tu-tu
« Reply #101 on: February 22, 2014, 10:54:11 PM »
Pretty cool video PStechPaul.
No hope if it doesn't work Alan.  ;D

Speaking of which. I manage a little play today. But I've got problems.
I made the binding posts. Took a shot at free-handing them. Turned out well enough I guess.
Naturally, you don't see the 1st one I made. Somehow got the tailstock off center so the through hole was way off.



As you can see, things are not true. The posts are at an angle. I know the holes are located correctly. The problem is the casting on the inside of the bell. Not enough room for the bolts and brushes. I need to mill a bit out. Should be okay after that.

I'm just happy that I turned on my machines today and got my handsome fingers dirtied.

BTW You can see what I was talking about the other day (week? month?) about the bushing. See that bit of aluminum around it? Scraped out by the bushing when I pressed it.

I had drilled/reamed the hole 1mm undersize. Too much for a press fit? Should it have been .5mm? It was pretty difficult to press...but then I was using an old cheapie drill press.

That's the second time I've needed to press something. I should look into getting a real press. (Arbor press?)
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
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Offline mklotz

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Re: The dynamo and the tu-tu
« Reply #102 on: February 22, 2014, 11:06:18 PM »
Quote
I had drilled/reamed the hole 1mm undersize. Too much for a press fit? Should it have been .5mm?

You might want to have a look at my FITS program.
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fcheslop

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Re: The dynamo and the tu-tu
« Reply #103 on: February 22, 2014, 11:30:57 PM »
For small bushes I simply use a nut and bolt to pull them in.
cheers

Online Dave Otto

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Re: The dynamo and the tu-tu
« Reply #104 on: February 23, 2014, 01:09:41 AM »
Hi Carl

On something that small a couple three tenths is plenty for a press fit; one MM (.0394") are you sure. I don't know how you even got it started let alone pressed in with out breaking something.

Dave